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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 




http://archive.org/details/agenda1991arts 



City and County 
ot San Francisco 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE MEETING 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



Tuesday, January 15, 1990 
2 PM 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 

Stanley Eichelbaum 

Kim Fowler 

Daniel Genera 

Anne Heaty 

John Kriken 

Robert F. LaRocca 

Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 

Ral Y. Okamoto 

_ Slldle Rosekrans 
^Ro* 

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



Arts Commission Conference Room 
Suite 70, 25 Van Ness Avenue 



ART ENRICHMENT: 



AGENDA 

MOSCONE CENTER 



Review of candidates for exterior site 
Selection of finalists 



Tonia Macneil; Jill Manton; Helene Fried, guest curator; 
Ronette King, Gensler and Associates; Germaine Wong, CAO's 
Office; Bill Carney, Redevelopment Agency. 



II 



ADJOURNMENT 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Drtscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



cdb 



vac-AGNl .15-91 







25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



MAYOR 
ArtAgnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara SWar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Ame Heaty 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains, Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
; Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



AC1ING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Drtscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Colectlon 
Ctvlc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

Slate-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



MINUTES FOR THE VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE MEETING 
JANUARY 15, 1991 

A special meeting of the Visual Arts Committee was held on 
Tuesday, January 15, 1991 at 2 pm in the Arts Commission 
Conference Room, Suite 70, 25 Van Ness Avenue. 

The meeting was called to order at 2:15 pm . 

Roll: Commissioners Present Staff Present: 



Anne Healy-Chair 
Nancy Boas 
Robert La Rocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains 

ARTS ENRICHMENT: 



Ionia Macneil 
Jill Manton 



MOSCONE CENTER 



The Selection Panel for the Moscone Site, consisting of 
the members of the Visual Arts Committee and Helene Fried, 
guest curator, met to continue reviewing candidates for 
the project. Also present as an advisor was Bill Carney 
from the Redevelopment Agency. 

The Selection Panel reviewed the slides of 28 artists and 
artist-led teams who had been previously selected at the 
November and December Panel meetings. Following 
discussion of the candidates, the following artists were 
selected as semi-finalists for further study: 

-Vito Acconci 

-Charles Amirkhanian, Kent and Craig Hodgetts, Ming Fung 

-Tony Cragg 

-Michael Davis, Mineko Grimmer, Richard Turner, Richard 

Thomas 
-Mark di Suvero 
-R.M. Fi seller 

-Doug Hoi lis, Stanley Saitowitz, Barbara Solomon 
-Andrew Leicester 

-Daniel Martinez, Renee Petropoulos, Rodger White 
-Eric Orr, Larry Bell, David Robinson 
-Vicki Scuri, Cheryl Barton, Fisher & Marantz 
-Keith Sonnier 
-Larry Sultan, Mike Mandel , Suzanne Hellmuth, Jock 

Reynolds, Frances Butler and John Ammirati 
-Martha Schwartz 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



VAC-MINI . 15-91 



The Panel requested that biographical and other background 
material be sent to them to study before the next meeting. 
They agreed that at the request of panel members, 
additional candidates might be included in the final 
review. Panelists asked staff to provide further 
information and references if possible for some of the 
selected candidates. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5 pm. 

Submitted, 



To 1 1 i 




a Macnei] 
Curator and Coordinator 
Moscone Center Art Enrichment 



VAC-MINI . 15-91 



AGENDA 

REGULAR MEETING OF THE VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

Wednesday, January 16th, 1991 

3 p.m. 

Suite 70, 25 Van Ness 

3:00 !■ Approval of Minutes to Dec. 19th, 1990 
meeting 

3:05 II. Consent Calendar 

A. Art Enrichment 

Motion to approve an extension of Gary 
Grahm's (Great Sea Wall medallion) 
contract for 1 month. 

B. Collections 

1. Motion to approve final payment of 
$500 to Jim Bernstein for the 
Airport Conservation Survey upon 
receipt of final report. 

2. Motion to approve contract 
extension to April 30, 1991 for Jim 
Bernstein for Earthquake Repair 

Work. 

3:10 III. Collections: PPIE Mural Project 

Progress Report; Debra Lehane 

3:15 IV. Collections: Airport 
Debra Lehane 

Discussion regarding problems concerning re- 
installation of Freda Koblick sculpture, 
"Night Sky" . 

3:25 V. Art Enrichment: Airport 
Susan Pontious 

1. Progress Report 

2. Approval of staff's pre-screening of 
applicants 

3:35 VI. Art Enrichment: Richmond Police Station 
Tonia Macneil 

Approval of stone type and colors for floor 
medallion design by Jaap Bongers. 

3:45 VII. Art Enrichment: San Andreas Water Treatment 
Plant. 

Tonia Macneil 
Project update 



3:50 VIII. Art Enrichment: Moscone Center 
Tonia Macneil 

1. Approval of finalists for proposal phase 
of Moscone exterior art enrichment. 

2. Approval of funds for proposal fees 

4:00 IX. Art Enrichment: Market Street Master Plan 
Jill Manton 
Progress Report 

4:10 X. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero 
Jill Manton 

Set dates for Embarcadero Selection Panel 
meeting 

4:20 XI. Art Enrichment: Library 
Jill Manton 
Progress Report 

4:30 XII. Art Enrichment: Policy 

Staff 

Discussion of fee structure policy for 

artists commissioned for art enrichment 

projects 

5:00 XIII. Art Enrichment: New Sheriff's Facility 
Susan Pontious 

Approval of final payments to Carl Cheng, 
($1,550); Doug Hollis, ($1,550); and Vicki 
Scuri ( $5,001 ) 

5:05 XIV. Art Enrichment: Kezar Stadium 
Susan Pontious 

Appointment of Commissioner/Commissioners to 
inspect fabrication of uates 

5:10 XV. Gallery 

Anne Meissner 

1 . Approval of 3 - 4 one-person shows 
scheduled from April 11 - May 18th. 

2. Discussion of guidelines for gallery 
operation: curatorial procedures; 
geograph i i 1 1 boundaries, and other 
admin is1 ra1 Lve Is ues . 

6:00 Adjournment 



City and County 
of San Francisco 




MINUTES TO VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE MEETING 
JANUARY 16, 1991 



25 Van Ness Avenue 
Suite 240 

San Francisco, ca 94102 Commissioners present : 

(415)554-9671 , ,. , , _, . . 

Anne Healy (Chair) 
Nancy Boas 
Robert LaRocca 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph D. 

a I Y. Okamoto 
pie Rosekrans 



Commissioners absent: 

Amalia Mesa-Baines 

Staff present: 

Debra Lehane 
Jill Manton 
Tonia Macneil 
Susan Pontious 
Ann Meissner 



The meeting was called to order at 3:10 p.m. 

I. Approval of Minutes to Dec. 19th, 1990 meeting 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the minutes 
of the December 19th, 1990 meeting. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so moved, 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Crvlc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



II 



Consent Calendar 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the Consent 
Calendar with the following items: 

1. Extension of Gary Grahm's contract for 1 
month (March 30, 1991 ) 

2. Final payment of $500 to Jim Bernstein for 
Airport Conservation survey. 

3. Extend Jim Bernstein's contract until April 
30, 199) for earthquake repair work. 

Commissioner LaRocca seconded. II was so moved. 



Suite 430 

Sate-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
1 55 Grove Street 
415-554 9682 



I 1 I 



Collections: DP IK Murals 

Debra Lehane reported that the PPIE Mural 
project had been very successful. The War 
Memorial was very pleased and t lie project was on 
budget. The murals were now properly stored in 



"3"' 



the basement of the War Memorial building and a 
conservation report was being put together. 
Nearly every City department sent a 
representative to see the murals, and some 
departments had already expressed interest in 
the works. We also now have a good set of color 
transparencies of the works. 



In response to a question from Commissioner 
Boas, Lehane reported that it will be much 
easier to unroll the works if we should want to 
do so in the future. However, she cautioned 
against unrolling the larger works. 

Commissioner Ilealy asked who would pay for the 
restoration of the murals if sites were 
identified for them. Lehane reported that she 
thinks that restoration would be a very fundable 
project, once sites are found. She also 
informe'i the Committee that the murals are owned 
by the War Memorial rather than the Art 
Commiss ion. 



IV 



a 



Collections: Airport 

Debra Lehane reported that she was having 
difficulty getting permission to re-install 
"Night Sky", a hanging sculpture by Freda 
Koblick. The artwork was one of three of the 
first artworks commissioned for the airport, but 
wasn't installed until 1981. 



The sculpture was removed after the October, 
1989 earthquake. Although the sculpture did not 
sustain damage, Lehane was told it had to be 
removed because of other repair work in the 
area . 

Since then, a I I the other artworks removed after 
the earthquake have been re-installed except for 
the Kohl Lck. At first Lehane said that the 
Airport staff questioned the safety of the 
Koblick, but Lehane said the work was in fact 
over-engineered. Then she was told by the 
Director of Operations t hat it was a matter of 
policy. How long does the airport have to keep 
artworks it commissions? 



VAC1 /16/9 1sp 



- 2 



Lehane said that she had replied in a letter 
that staff should not be making decisions about 
whether or to not re- install artwork thai was 
selected by the Joint Airport/Art Commission 
Committee. if the work is not to be re- 
installed, it should be a decision made by the 
Airport and Art Commissions. She reports that 
we have not received a formal request to not 
to re-install the artwork. She also said in her 
letter that the Art Commission could not afford 
to keep paying storage costs on the artwork. 

Susan Pontious reported that she had spoken to 
Jason Yuen, who had reported that he had raised 
the issue with Lou Turpin, Director of the 
Airport. Mr. Turpin said the issue with the 
Koblick was psychological rather than an 
engineering issue. During the earthquake it 
swung quite a bit and people were frightened. He 
was going to write a letter to Margie O'Driscoll 
requesting that the Art Commission either 
relocate or de-accession the piece. Besides the 
Koblick, the same issue was being raised 
regarding the other suspended sculptures in the 
termi rial . 

Pontious reported that she had asked about the 
continued cost of storage, and Mr. Yuen reported 
that Mr. Turpin had agreed to pay storage costs, 
although he thought the Art Commission's monthly 
storage cost high. Pont ions replied that was 
because the artwork was being stored by Atthowe 
in conservator i a 1 1 \ approved conditions. 

I n the same conversation, she said that Jason 
Yuen had reported that the Airport Commission 
had appointed three members to serve on a Joint 
Committee (which they want to revive). They 
have appointed Hill Coblentz (former Airport 
Commissioner ) i Stan Mat ti son (new Airport 
Commissioner), and Jason Yuen. 

Discussion ensued regarding the desirability of 

i i t u i i ii g the Joint Commi ttee . Pontious 
said that in her Master Plan outline, she had 
envisioned a Steering Commi ttee made up of 
Virporl and Art Commission commissioners and 
staff. This Co lit tee would serve a planning 



vaci /16/91sp 



- J 



function and make a recommendation on a variety 
of issues, such as de-accessioning and artist 
selection procedures. 

Commissioner Healy said that she did not want to 
call the committee a Joint Committee because 
that equated with an old process that did not 
work. The commit Lee should be called something 
else, i.e. steering committee or advisory panel. 

Debra Lehane reported that historically, the 
Airport has had as much input regarding the 
artwork selected as the Art Commission. 

Regarding the question of the sale of artworks 
at the Airport, Commissioner LaHocca said that 
the art is owned by the Art Commission. If 
works are sold, Commissioner Boas said, the 
money goes baric to the general fund, not the art 
budget. Lehane said we would have to go to the 
Board of Supervisors and request, that the funds 
from t tie sale of artwork go back into the art 
fund. 

Regarding the removal or de-accessioning of the 
Koblick, Commissioner Healy expressed concern 
about sol t ing of a presedent. She felt the work 
was successful in that space. 

Lehane said that she lias been in touch with the 
artist, Freda Koblick regarding the airport's 
concerns. The artist feels very strongly about 
her work, and wi 1 ] f ight to keep it up. Lehane 
reported that she did not know whether or not 
the artist would have any grounds for a lawsuit 
regarding this issue. 

Pont. ions suggested that, perhaps when the new 
committee is formed, perhaps one of the first 
issues they could look at would be policy 
regarding dp-accessioning. 

It was agreed that when Margie O'Driscoll 
received the letter- from Lou Turpin regarding 
I tie Koblicki that this is what she should 
suggest . 

V. Art. Enrichment: Richmond Police Station 



VACl/16/91sp 



Tonia Macneil presented the materials that 
artist Jaap Bongers is proposing to use for the 
two floor medallions for the Richmond Police 
Station. Lt. Thomas Suttmeier and project 
architect Peter Wong were also present. 

Macneil reported that the artist had decided to 
use marble for the large medallion instead of 
granite. She presented marble samples in black, 
white, green and rose. She also showed a sample 
of the polished bronze the artist intends to 
use. She reported that the artist had replaced 
the blue in the design with the rose color 
because blue marble was not available. 

Commissioner Healy thought the color 
combinations were very tasteful, but expressed 
regret that the rose wasn't a stronger color to 
provide a little more "punch" to the design. 

Jill Manton suggested that perhaps the Committee 
could give conditional approval today, and ask 
the artist to continue to look into alternatives 
to the rose, and if he finds something, he could 
bring it to the Art Commission meeting in 
February . 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the 
materials conditional on further exploration of 
the rose marble or granite. She said that what 
the Committee is looking for is a color that has 
a little more punch, similar to what the blue 
has in the design. Commissioner Boas seconded. 
The motion was approved. 

The Committee requested that the artist to re-do 
the design drawing in the actual colors that 
will be used for presentation to the police 
department . 

Jill Manton asked about the progress of Shelly 
Jurs' piece. Macneil reported that the artist 
can't start until she gets the exact 
measurements from Peter Wong. He reported that 
he will have those for her soon. Jurs does not 
think that she will have any trouble completing 
the work by August.. 



VACl/16/91sp 



Page 



VI. Art Enrichment: Market Street 

Jill Manton reported that the Market Street 
Design Team had met with her and Margie 
O'Driscoll, and that they had come to the 
conclusion that they would try to work out their 
differences and continue to work together. 

Manton said that the Committee at the last 
meeting had given her definite direction 
regarding not expanding the team's scope of work 
to include the design of upper Market Street. 
Since the Committee had previously voted to 
modify the team's contract to expand their scope 
of work to include design work on upper Market 
Street, and to increase their fee by $5,000, it 
now needs to rescind that resolution. 

Commissioner LaRocca moved to rescind the 
contract modification. Commissioner Healy 
seconded. It was so moved. 

Another issue discussed was the "seeding" 
activities for Market Street brought up at the 
last meeting. Some of the ideas included a 
series of proposals for bus shelter posters and 
working with the Castro Theater to pump organ 
music into the Muni-Metro Station at Market and 
Castro Streets. 

Manton said that she just wanted to clarify that 
it was okay to begin some of the "seeding" 
projects prior to the Master Plan being 
completed in March/April. 

Commissioner lioas expressed concern about the 
cost of the posters. in the case of the "What 
Is The Highest l-'orm of Public Art?" poster, 
which would have black letters and a lot of 
white space, she expressed concern that there 
might he a lot of graffiti . 

Manton replied that this particular poster would 
not cost as much as the children's posters 
because they would be black and white as opposed 
to color. she said thai the formal would be 
similar to the AIDS posters that are up, which 
have not been graffitied. 



VACl/16/91sp Page - 6 



She reported that the bus shelters are now being 
installed. At the Mayor's request, the 
children's posters would be the first poster 
series installed in them. 

Commissioner LaRocca said that staff should be 
sure to block out time to advertise the POPS in 
the Bus Shelter space. Mantori said that while 
we should use our spaces to advertise our 
events, it was envisioned that those spaces 
would be used for actual artwork, not just 
advertising . 

She said that the Exploratorium had heard about 
the Master Plan and the seeding activities, and 
Peter Richards had called regarding the idea of 
a film program one weekend at Hallidae Plaza. 
The Exploratorium would ask the Commission to 
match their funds for the event (under $1,000). 

Manton's questions to the Committee were: 
whether or not they had concerns about doing 
events before the Master Plan came out. and how 
the Committee felt regarding going ahead with 
some of these activities. Manton said that the 
activities she was considering were the Film 
Event, the Castro Theater proposal, and the 2nd 
series of posters. 

She asked for conceptual approval to begin 
planning for a f'iLm program in April. The 
Committee would receive more information 
regarding what would be shown, how it would be 
organized, what costs are appropr iate , etc. She 
would make sure that the Arts Commission got 
credi t . 

Commissioner Boas wanted to know how the 
Exploratorium would advertise the event and how 
many people attended a similar event the 
Exploratorium hosted last year. 

The Committee expressed interest in the event, 
but wanted more information. 

The issue of Fox I'la/.a was raised. 
Commissioners llealy and LaRocca said Lhat the 
Fox Plaza site was one of the most unfortunate 



VACl/16/91sp Page - 7 



in the City and that it was an area that had to 
be addressed as part of the Master Plan. 

Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve going 
forward with the "seed" activities proposed by 
Manton. Commissioner Healy seconded. It was so 
moved . 

VII. Art Enrichment: San Andreas Water Treatment 
Plant 

Tonia Macneil gave a progress report on the San 
Andreas project. She reported that she and the 
artists would be meeting with the Water Dept. 
management the next day. The artists have 
created a general outline of the areas that they 
want to cover, and have been talking to 
publishers and writers who might function as an 
editor on the book and photographers. 

Commissioners Boas and Healy raised questions 
regarding what exactly would be Collins and 
Goto's role in the production of the book. 
Macneil said that she had asked the artists to 
clarify that issue in writing. 

Commissioner Healy stressed that she wanted to 
make sure that the book was the artists' and 
that it represent their personal vision. 
Macneil said that she had made it clear to the 
artists that this was what the Commission 
currently expected, and if the artists were 
intending a different approach, they needed to 
come back to the Commission for approval. 



VIII 



The Committee stressed that they were interested 
in an artist book -- a personal art statement. 
It was suggested that the artists look at other 
artist books, but not try to replicate any other 
book they might have seen. 

Art Enrichment: Moscone 

Tonia Macneil gave the Committee the list of the 
artists still being considered for the Moscone 
exterior. It was agreed that staff would send 
the select ion panel biographical information on 
each of these artists or artist teams, 



VACl/Ui/9 1 sp 



Page - H 



The date for the next review would be Monday, 
January 28th, from 2-5 p.m. 

The final selection of the proposal for the 
Moscone large wall would be Wednesday, January 
30th at 2 p.m. 

Commissioner Healy will write Rudy Nothenberg a 
letter inviting him to attend. 

The proposal macquett.es will be due on the 27th. 
Tonia Macneil will work with Debra Lehane 
regarding receipts for the work. 



IX. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero 

Jill Manton reported that there would be four 
Kmbarcadero selection panels for the four 
Embarcadero projects. She asked that one 
commissioner serve on each panel. She requested 
that Commissioner Boas serve on the panel for 
the Signage Project, Commissioner Healy serve 
on the panel for the Promenade Project, 
Commissioner LaRocca serve on the panel for the 
Gateway Project and Commissioner Mesa-Baines 
serve on the panel for the Portal Project. 

Manton reported that the panel for the Promenade 
Project would also include Doug Mollis, Suzanne 
Lacy, Paulo Polledri. Carl Cheng had declined, 
so she was looking for another appointee. 

For the Signage Project, she was looking for a 
literary panelist and was considering someone 
with a literary background. Some of the people 
she is considering are: Frances Phillips, 
Director of Intersection for the Arts, Howard 
Junker, Editor or Zyvvyva, Michael Palmer, poet, 
or Bill Nesterick, who heads the Film Program 
at UC Berkeley. 

She was also considering a graphic arts person, 
such as Michael Vanderbyl , or Primo Angeli. 
Commissioner LaRocca suggested Lillian Tom. 

It was suggested that it might be beneficial to 
have a historian on the panel. 



VACl/16/91sp Page - 9 



For the Gateway Project, Manton was considering 
Galen Cranz from UC Berkeley, and a local art 
writer such as Rebecca Solnit or Marcia Tanner. 

Manton will work with each of the commissioners 
to finalize the make-up of the panel for their 
projects . 

The date of the Promenade Panel will be the 6th 
or the 8th of February. 

Manton reported that the PUC is going to pay for 
a trip to Seattle and Portland for Manton, their 
project manager and engineer to look at art in 
transit projects. 



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Art Enrichment: Library 

Manton reported that Lothar Baumgarten was 
meeting with the architects in New York on Jan. 
17th. Barbara Sklar was meeting with him and 
Marian Goodman on the same day to discuss 
realistic fee expectations. 

At the next Visual Arts Committee meeting, 
Manton expects to present Nayland Blake's model 
and a further refinement of Ann Hamilton and Ann 
Chamberlain's concepts. Proposals by Lothar 
Baumgarten and Alice Ayecock would also be 
presented . 



XI 



Art Enrichment: New Sheriff's Facility 
Commissioner Mealy moved to approve final 
payment to Carl Cheng ($1,550), Doug Mollis 
($1,550) and V icki Scuri ($5,001). The motion 



VAC1 / 16/91 sp 



Page - 10 



was seconded by Commissioner LaRocca. The 
motion was approved. 

Pontious reported that Carl Cheng needed to 
develop the computer program for the heliostats 
now because it would effect the specifications 
for the fabricator. Commissioner Healy moved to 
approve a three month extension for Carl Cheng's 
contract with a $8,000 fee increase. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The motion was 
carried . 

XII. Art Enrichment: Kezar Stadium 

Susan Pontious reported that the Committee 
needed to appoint a Commissioner to inspect the 
progress of the Kezar Stadium gates on behalf of 
the Art Commission. Commissioner LaRocca was 
appointed . 

Commissioner LaRocca left the meeting at this point. 

XIII. Policy: Artist Fee Structure 

Jill Manton reported that the City Auditor had 
asked to see a written policy regarding how the 
Commission determines artist fees for art 
enrichment projects. In response the staff had 
drafted a policy for- determining artist fees for 
the Committee's review and consideration. The 
Committee felt that establishing written policy 
was a good idea, and asked staff to continue 
research regarding fee policy or practices in 
other cities. 

XTV. Gallery 

Anne Meissner reported that the ongoing friction 
between the Advisory Board and the Visual Arts 
Committee was symptomatic of some real problems 
that she would like to work to resolve. It was 
suggested that perhaps guidelines should be 
established, but the matter should be discussed 
when the full Committee was present. 

Meissner presented the Committee with a list of 
the show ideas and artists who were being 
considered for the remainder of 1991. 

They were : 



VACl/16/91sp Page - 1 1 



Public Domain; a show of appropriated images and 
materials and fabricated photographs, scheduled 
between April 25 - June 1; Otre Cara or 

Pachucos; June 27 - Aug. 3; Jess and Duncan; 
August 15 - Sept. 27; and City Site: In Site, a 
gallery show in association with the outdoor 
City Site Installations, or installations by 3 
artists, scheduled for Oct. 10 - Nov. 23rd. 

Regarding the Otre Cara show, which would be 
scheduled to coincide with the C.A.R.A. show at 
S.F. Museum of Modern Art, Meissner reported 
that she would not be able to collaborate with 
Los Angeles artists as had been suggested by 
Commissioner Mesa-Baines. She said that the 
gallery did not have the resources to ship work, 
and exhibiting out of area artists was in 
conflict with the gallery's policy of exhibiting 
emerging local artists. 

Meissner reported that the gallery would be 
closed for three weeks in April and June because 
of the amount of accumulated staff comp time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:45 p.m. 

ORDERS AND REPORTS: 

1. Ordered: Approval of the minutes for the December 
19th, 1990 meeting. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Approval of Consent Calendar items: 

a. Extension of Gary Grahm's contract by 1 month 
(March 30, 1991 ) . 

b. Final payment of $500 to Jim Bernstein for the 
Airport Conservation Survey upon receipt of the 
final report. 

c. Extension of Jim Bernstein's contract to April 
30, 1991 for earthquake repair work. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote : Unan i mous 



VACl/16/91sp Page - 12 



3. Ordered: Approval of the materials proposed by Jaap 
Bongers for the Richmond Police Station medallions, 
conditional on further exploration of the rose marble 
or granite. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: to rescind the previous contract 
modification order for the Market Street Design Team 
(Resolution #905-90-298) changing the team's scope of 
work to include design work on upper Market Street 
and providing a $5,000 increase in fees. 

5. Ordered: To proceed with developing the "seed" 
activities for Market Street, such as the bus shelter 
posters, piping organ music from the Castro Theater 
into the Castro Muni Station, and pursuing the 
possibility of a weekend film festival in Halliday 
Plaza in conjunction with the Exploratorium . 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: Approval final payment to Carl Cheng 
($1,550), Doug Hollis ($1,550) and Vicki Scuri 
($5,001) for design of the New Sheriff's Facility. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: Approval of a three month extension for 
Carl Cheng's contract for the New Sheriff's Facility 
with a $8,000 fee increase to develop the computer 
program for the Heliostat. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



Submitted 




Susan Ponti 



I: 



VACl/16/91sp 



Page - 13 




SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

I 55 Grove Street, San Francisco, California 94 102 (415) 554-9682 

January . 1991 

EXHIBIT SCHEDULE - 1991 

1) PUBLIC DOMAIN : appropriated images/materials, fabricated photographs 

Apr.i 1 25 - June 1 



Artists being considar.ed: 

Chris Sullivan mZDCUL^jp* q[ C\ 

Yanik Wagner ^,wv^^ a ^ exXXe^e^ 

Amanda Hendricks 

Charles Gute 

Bill Bury 

Greg Adair 

Galen Brown 

James Garza 

Janet Bogardus 

George Longfish 

William Passarelli 

Maki Tshiwata 

Cheryl Brodie 

2} OTRE CARA _ or _ P ACHUCOS 

Show in conjunction with "C.A.R.A." at SFMOMA 

June 27 - August 3 

3 ) JESS & DUNCA N 

August 15 - September 27 
Consultant: Christopher Wagstaff 

4) City Sit-e: In Site - a gallery show in association with City Site 
installations by 3 artists C^ol iOi^a ) trv^ /Y$-<s^U/-\ 

October 10 - November 23 

Suggested artists: Alan Rath/Dewey Crumpler/Mark Music/ 



A project of the S. F. Arts Commission and Friends of the Arts. 

GALLERY HOURS: Tuesday through Saturday: I I • S PM Thursday: I 1-8 PM 



ity and County of San Francisco 




Memorandum 



Art Commission 

Claire N. Isaacs 
DIRECTOR 



Date: 1/1 1/91 

To: Visual Arts Committee 

From: Public Art Staff 

Subject: Establishing Policy Guidelines for Art Enrichment Artist's Fees 

In response to questions from the City Auditor regarding Art Commission 
policy regarding how artist fees are determined, the staff has drafted 
the attached preliminary policy recommendations for your consideration 
and discussion at the Jan. 16th VAC meeting. Please review prior to 
that meeting. 




5)554-9671 



25 VAN NESS AVE. SUITE 240 



SAN FRANCISCO, 94102 



PROPOSED GUIDELINES FOR FEE STRUCTURE FOR ARTIST COMMISSIONS 
AWARDED BY THE SAN FRANCISCO ART COMMISSION 

STATEMENT OF INTENT: It is the policy of the San Francisco 
Art Co mmission to pay professional fees for all creative 
work re quested from artists . The Commission's charge of 
public accountability requires a consistent policy for 
awarding equitable artist fees for public art projects. 
The following guidelines for fee structures are based on 
professional standards established by the public art field, 
and on the fees paid to other design professionals in the 
related fields of architecture and landscape architecture. 
Because the particular circumstances for each project vary, 
the following should be seen as guidelines only, not as 
rigid formulas. 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES: In general, the Commission will 
consider the following factors in determining the artist 
fees awarded for each project. 

1. The scope of work and length of artist involvement 

2. The project budget; fee ranges are based on a 
percentage of the total art enrichment budget 
(exclusive of administration fees). 

3. The artists' experience and professional standing 

4. The fee scale for similar scopes of work on 
comparable projects 

TYPES OF ARTIST SERVICES AND CONTRACTS: DEFINITION OF TERMS 

Artist Fees: Artist fees refer to that portion of the 
project budget reserved for payment to the artist for 
his/her creative services. Fees do not include other labor, 
materials, or travel and sustenance allowances for out-of- 
town artists. 

Project Budget: Art enrichment funds exclusive of Art 
Commission administration allocation. 

Implementation Budget: All costs associated with project 
implementation exclusive of design fees: including 
fabrication, transportation, insurance, bonding, related 
labor and materials costs. 

Proposal Maquette: A preliminary design proposal in the 
form of either drawings or a models typically requested from 
a liminted number of finalists ( 2 - 5 ) as a means of 
providing the basis for final artist selection. 



Typical Scope of Work: Production of design drawing or 
maquette. Artist reviews site plans provided by project 
architects and/or landscape architects, and makes an actual 
site visit whenever possible. Proposal include a 
preliminary budget, list of materials and a description of 
the fabrication methods to be used. For some larger 
commissions, candidates may be asked to attend an interview 
with representatives from the Art Commission, client agency, 
and project architects. 

Maquette Honorarium: Modest payment made to each finalist 
for a proposal macquette. 

Single Contracts Inclusive of All Phases of Work: Usually 
issued after the artist has been selected by means of a 
proposal maquette. The contract is for the artist to 
produce the artwork proposed in the macquette, and covers 
all phases of work, including final design, fabrication, 
transportation and installation. 

Scope-of-Work: Refinement of design, often including 
certification of structural components by licensed engineer 
or design professional. Fabrication and installation of 
artwork by artist, often in conjunction with subcontractors. 
Artist required to meet with and/or confer with Art 
Commission staff, the client agency, and project architects 
as necessary throughout the duration of the contract. 

Design Contract: Separate design contracts are issued when 
the artists is selected on the basis of past work. The 
artist is expected to develop a design proposal only after 
a thorough investigation of the site and meetings with the 
client agency, project architects/landscape architects, and 
any other artists on the project. The Art Commission must 
approve the final design before the actual work is 
commissioned . 

Sometimes more than one contract is issued for the design 
phase, i.e. one for conceptual development, resulting in a 
proposal drawing or macquette and a preliminary budget, and 
a second contract for design development through 
construction documents. The fee scale recommendations here 
are for the entire design process through construction 
documents. If separate contracts are issued for different 
design phases, the amount of each contract would be 
proportionate to the recommended fee for the complete design 
phase . 

Scope of Work: This process usually requires numerous 
meetings with other principals on the project, including 
representatives of the client agency, other city/government 
agencies, and members of the community. The scope of work 
can be divided into three major stages: schematic or 
conceptual design; design development ; and final design 



resulting in construction documents, signed by a licensed 
design professional or engineer. Throughout the process, 
the artist coordinates his/her activities with the project 
architects, and meets with Art Commission and client agency 
staff as necessary. The artist is responsible for producing 
a durable maquette for each proposed design concept; 
developing a complete budget for all project costs, 
identifying all materials and fabrication methods and all 
subcontractors to be used. 

Fabrication Contract: A contract for implementation of a 
project, (fabrication, transportation and installation), 
once final design and construction documents have been 
completed and approved through a design contract. 

Scope of Work: The scope of work varies widely between 
projects where 1 ) the artist fabricates and installs the 
artwork him/herself, 2) The artist does not fabricate and 
install the work him/herself, but is responsible for 
personally subcontracting and overseeing fabrication and/or 
installation 3 ) fabrication and installation of the artwork 
are part of the scope-of-work of the capital improvement 
project's general contractor, and the artist's role is for 
oversight only. 

Planning Contract: Contract where an artist is engaged in 
art master planning for a site. The contract results in a 
written plan outlining the art program for a site; the plan 
identifies opportunities for artist involvement, but without 
proposing or designing the actual artwork. 

Scope of Work: The artist is required to participate as a 
team member with project architects and city staff to 
develop art program master plan; identify sites and 
opportunities for future artist involvement; develop 
criteria and guidelines for future commissions; define scope 
of work of artists who will be commissioned later; help to 
prepare preliminary program budget and prepare arts program 
report with all of the above information. 

ARTIST SERVICES AND CONTRACTS: 
FEE SCALE RECOMMENDATIONS 
1. Macquette Honorarium: 

Recommended Fee Range .05- 2% of Project Cost: 

Sample fee range for each finalist on a given project: 

Project Budget: Sample Fee Range: 

Under $10,000 $100 - $200 

$10,000 - $30,000 $250 - $600 

$30,000 - $50,000 $500 - $1,000 

$50,000 - $100,000 $750 - $2,000 

$100,000 - $250,000 $1,()U() - $5,000 

$250,000 - $500,000 $1,250 - $10,000 

$500,000 and up $2,500 and up 



$ 


500 ea. 


.08% 


$4 


,000 


ea. 


2% 


$ 3 


,500 


ea. 


.07% 


$ 


500 


ea. 


3% 



Current Sample Projects: 

Project: Budget: Honorar i um: 

Bush/Polk $60,000 
Moscone Int. $200,000 
Moscone Ext. $500,000 
Richmond Police 
medallion: $ 14,000 

2. Single Contracts for All Phases of Work; design, 
fabrication, transportation and installation 

Recommended Fee Range: 20 - 35% of Project Budget 
Current Sample Projects: 

Project Project Budget Artist Fees % of Budget 

Kezar Stadium $97,000 $25,500 26% 

Bush/Polk Gar. $60,000 $25,000 41% 

Sunnydale Pump $400,000 $40,000 10% 

3. Design Contracts: 

Recommended Fee Range: 10 - 20% of project budget. Design 
fees should be for the artist's services and nominal 
expenses incurred in preparing design drawings and 
macquettes. The expense of out-of-town travel, blueprints, 
other professional fees, and the production of professional 
architectural models should not be absorbed in the artist's 
fee, but rather be a separate project budget line item. 

Current Sample Projects: 

Project : Project Budget: Design Fee: % of Total 
Sheriff's Fac . $540,000 3 @ $20,000 ea . 

$60,000 total 11% 

San Andreas II $ 62,000 2 @ $6,000 ea. 

$12,000 total 19% 

Library $900,000 est. 4 @ $33,750 

$135,000 (est) 15% 

4. Fabrication Contracts 

Fee Range Recommendations: 10 - 20% of implementation 
budget; fees within this range to be negotiated relative to 
the artist's anticipated scope of work. 

Note: In the case where the artwork is being fabricated and 
installed under the the auspices of the general contractor's 
contract, and the artist's role is for oversight only, 
another option is to pay an hourly consulting fee as per 
Seattle's Transit Project. They contracted to pay at a rate 
of $40 p/hr with a ceiling on the number of hours. 



Sample Current Projects: 

Project : Imp. Budget: Fabrication Fee: % 
Sheriff's Fac . $345,000 (est) 3 @ $20,000 ea. 

$60,000 total (est) 17% 

4. Planning Contracts 

Fee Scale Recommendation: Fee scale should be based on 
the average annual salary of design professional with 
comparable experience; i.e. if the annual salary of mid- 
level architects averages between * $40,000 - $50,000, and 
a project is expected to last approximately 6 mos . ; an 
appropriate artist's fee should be between $20,000 and 
$25,000. 

Current Sample Projects: 

Project: Duration: Fee : 

Embarcadero Master Plan 6 mos. $20,000 

Airport Master Plan 6 mos. $20,000 

*Based on 1990-91 salary standards. 



City and County 
ol San Francisco 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Ranclsco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



MINUTES FOR THE VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE MEETING 
JANUARY 28, 1991 

A special meeting of the Visual Arts Committee was held on 
Monday, January 28, 1991 at 2 pm in the Arts Commission 
Conference Room, Suite 70, 25 Van Ness Avenue. 

The meeting was called to order at 2:15 pm 

Roll: Commissioners Present Staff Present 



MAYOR 
ArtAgnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
AnneHeaty 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-fialns. Ph.D. 
P"' v. Okamoto 
_ m ^,"j Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ol the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Drlscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Ctvlc Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Anne Healy-Chair 
Nancy Boas 
Robert La Rocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains 

ARTS ENRICHMENT: 



Tonia Macneil 
Jill Manton 



MOSCONE CENTER/HOWARD STREET 



The Selection Panel for the Moscone/Howard Street site met 
to continue reviewing candidates for the project. Also 
present as advisors were Germaine Wong of the CAO ' s office, 
Peter Gordon and Runette King of Gensler and Associates and 
Bill Carney of the Redevelopment Agency. 

The project manager, Tonia Macneil, reminded the panel that 
the task was to select 3 finalists who would be asked to 
produce proposals for the site. She and Jill Manton 
presented recommendations and additional information for 
several of the artists. 16 candidates were reviewed and 
discussed, after which the Panel agreed to continue the 
review at a final meeting on January 30. 

The candidates who were selected for presentation on January 
30 were: 

Vito Acconci 

Eric Orr, Larry Bell and David Robinson 

Michael Davis, Mineko Grimmer, Richard Turner 
and Richard Thomas 

Mark Di Suvero 

R.M. Fischer 

DanieL Martinez, Renee Petroupolis 
and Rodger White 

Martha Schwa r I 



Suite 430 

Stote-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
H15-554 -41682 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 pm. 

Submitted: 

Ton ia Mactiei 

Curator and Coordinator 

Public Art Program 




VAC-MINI .28-91 



City and County 
of San Francisco 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX * 621-3868 



MINUTES FOR THE VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE MEETING 

JANUARY 30, 1991 

2 PM 

A special meeting of the Visual Arts Committee was held on 
Wednesday, January 30, 1991 at 2 pm in the Arts Commission 
Conference Room, Suite 70, 25 Van Ness Avenue. 



MAYOR 
ArtAgnot 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara SWar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 

Stanley Elchelbaum 

Kim Fowler 

Daniel Genera 

AmeHealy 

John Krlken 

Robert F. LaRocca 

Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 

fr^JhO komoto 

•••'■IRosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



The meeting was called to order at 2 pm . 

Roll: Commissioners Present Staff Present 



Anne Healy-Chair 
Nancy Boas 
Robert La Rocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains 



Tonia Macneil 
Jill Manton 
Susan Pontious 



ARTS ENRICHMENT: 



MOSCONE CENTER/ESPLANADE BALLROOM 



The Visual Arts Committee met in its capacity of the 
Selection Panel for the Moscone Center "Large Wall" 
project. Attending in an advisory capacity were: 
Germaine Wong of the CAO ' s office and Peter Gordon and 
Ronette King of Gensler and Associates. 

Five candidates had submitted maquettes for the wall in 
the lobby of the Esplanade Ballroom: 

Ismael Frigerio 

Hung Liu 

Judy Pfaff 

Cheri Raciti 

John Valadez 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Driscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Fes rivals 
CMC Art Colectlon 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554 -9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



=S 



Following a staff explanation of each proposal, each was 
discussed in depth. The Committee eventually voted 
unanimously to select the proposal of Hung Liu involving a 
recreation of the first map of San Francisco and artifacts 
from area archaeological excavations. 

During the discussion of Hung Liu's proposal, a number of 
issues were raised which the Committee agreed would 
require resolution before the proposal was finally 
accepted. The Committee requested that a meeting be 
arranged among the artist, staff, and Commissioner Healy 
to convey the concerns and suggestions of the Panel and 
advisors. In particular, suggestions included a desire 
for more use of color, expanding the design to include 
contiguous walls and assurance that the American Indian 



VAC-MINI . 30-91 twm 



Page - 1 



community would support Hung Liu's proposal. Commissioner 
Mesa-Bains moved and Commissioner Healy seconded that Hung 
Liu's proposal for art work for the Moscone Center 
Esplanade Ballroom Large Wall be accepted. The ayes were 
unanimous . 

II. ART ENRICHMENT: MOSCONE CENTER/HOWARD STREET 

The Selection Panel, including Helene Fried, for the 
Moscone/Howard Street Site convened to continue reviewing 
slides of the seven remaining candidates. Advising the 
Panel were Germaine Wong, Peter Gordon and Ronette King 
and Bill Carney from the Redevelopment Agency. 

It was announced that additional funds had been secured so 
that 5 finalists could be selected for the proposal phase. 
After discussion and viewing of the model, the five 
finalists were: 

V i to Acconc i 

Eric Orr, Larry Bell and David Robinson 

Michael Davis, Mineko Grimmer, Richard Turner 

and Richard Thomas 
Daniel Martinez, Renee Petroupolis 

and Rodger White 
Martha Schwartz 

Commissioner Healy moved and Commissioner LaRocca seconded 
that the Committee approve the selection of the five 
artists and artist-teams for the proposal phase. The ayes 
were unanimous. 

The proposal phase will involve a one-day briefing of all 
the finalists, followed on the second day by interviews. 

The meeting was adjourned at 

REPORTS AND ORDERS 

ORDERED: Motion to authorize the Director to enter into 
contract with Hung Liu for an amount not to exceed 
$200,000 for an art work for the Moscone Center Esplanade 
Ballroom, contingent upon approval of the revised proposal 
by the Visual Arts Committee. 
Moved: Mesa-Bains 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MINI .30-9 1 twin Page - 2 



ORDERED: Motion to approve the selection of Vito Acconci, 
Martha Schwartz and three teams led by Michael Davis, 
Daniel Martinez, and Eric Orr to produce proposals for the 
Moscone/Howard Street Site, and to authorize the payment 
of a proposal fee of $3,500.00 each and related travel 
expenses . 
Moved: Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



Submitted , 



-muev Hat, 




Tonia Macneil 

Curator and Coordinator 

Public Art Program 



VAC-MINI . 30-91 twm 



Page - 3 



City and County 
of San Frar -jlsco 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



MAYOR 
ArtAgnos 



AGENDA 

Regular Meeting of the Visual Arts Committee 

Wednesday, 3 p.m. Feb. 20, 1991 

25 Van Ness, Suite 70 



3:00 I. Approval of Jan. 16th Minutes 

3:05 II. Collections 

Susan Pontious for Debra Lehane 

1 . New plaques for Holocaust Memorial 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 

Y. Okamoto 

lie Rosekrans 



2. 



Estate gift 



3:15 III. Art Enrichment: Library 

Jill Manton and Susan Pontious 

Visitors: Jennifer Sage, Cathy Simon and 

Nayland Blake 

1. Progress Report: Ann Hamilton and 
Nayland Blake 

2. Proposal presentation: Alice Ayecock 
and Lothar Baumgarten 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



4:00 IV. 



3. Project timeline 

Art Enrichment: New Sheriff's Facility 

Susan Pontious; Visitor: Lt . Lavigne 
1. Request from Sheriff's Dept . for 

design change in the "community room" 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Drlscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



fc ....-» 



4:15 V. 



4:45 VI 



2. Authorization to enter into contract 
with Vicki Scuri and Carl Cheng for 
fabrication/installation phase of art 
proposals for New Sheriff's Facility. 

Art Enrichment: Mental Health Facility 

Susan Pontious; Visitor: Phyllis Harding 

1 . Approval of conceptual art plan for 
interior of facility 

2. Authorization to begin soliciting 
slides of 2-dimensional work for 
interior 

3. Progress report on rest of program 

Art Enrichment: Islais Creek Pump Station 
Jill Manton; Visitor: Bruce Klynn 



4:55 VII. Exploratorium 

1. Film proposal 

2. Will Nettleship proposal for map for 
sight impaired. 

5:10 VIII. Gallery: Public Domain exhibit 
Anne Meissner 

5:20 IX. Art Enrichment: Progress Reports 

Tonia Macneil 

1. Richmond Police Station 

2. Moscone 

3. Bush-Polk Parking Garage 

5:30 Art Enrichment: Progress Reports 

Jill Manton 

1 . Embarcadero 

2. Market Street Master Plan 

5:40 Art Enrichment: Progress Reports 

Susan Pontious 

1 . Great Sea Wall 

2. Airport 

5:45 Policy 

1 . Mission Statement 

2. Ordinance Change: Justification of 
Fee Increase 

6:00 Adjournment 



City and County 
of San Francisco 




MINUTES TO REGULAR MEETING OK THE VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

FEBRUARY 20, 1991 

Corrected 3/27/91 



25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102. 

(415)554 9671 ''OMissioners Present 
Nancy boas 
Anne Heal y 
Robert LaRocca 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President i 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy I I . 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
Dodie Rosekrans 



Staff Present: 

Jill Manton 
'Ionia Macneil 
Anne Mei ssner 
Susan Pontious 



bX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415 554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Approval of Jan. 16th Minutes 

Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve the minutes of 
the Jan. 16th meeting. Commissioner Boas seconded. 
It was so moved. 



Col 1 ec t i ons : 

I . Holocaust Memorial 

Susan Pont ious, on behalf of Debra L 
informed the Committee that a replac 
as well as some add it ional plaques w 
proposed for the Holocaust Memorial, 
and materials had already been appro 
Design and the art ist. Felix Warbui 
architect for the project , was prese 
the committee the sample granite and 
styles proposed. Tin add it LonaJ pi a 
contain text about the history of th 
and the art ist ' s statement about how 
holocaust effected him. 1'here will 
i ndividuaJ plaques wi th I lit- names of 
i oncentrat Lon camps engraved. 



ehane , 

ement plaque 

ere being 

The text 
ved b y ( ' i v i c 
g , the 
n t to show 

lettering 
ques will 
e II" 1 ocaust 

the 
also be 

each of the 



Mr. Warburg presented a sample plaque with black 
paint in the interior of I lie engraved letters to 
help make the text more readable . He felt this 
color was too dark, bill that a graj paint mighl 
be app rop r i a I e . 

Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve the 
plaques based on Felix Warburg's iudgemenl of 
the color to be used to accent the Lettering ■ 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 




Deques) from Mrs. Alice IvnMi 
The Ails Commission has been left, a beques 
Mrs. Alice Ivaldi of a painting by Karl Em 
Teliinoli I sen . The painting is a copy of a 
Uembranl . The Commission can either accep 
paint ing, or authorize executor of the wil 
include it in an estate auction. Collet: 
Manager Debra l.ehane has seen the paint i n« 
•Since it does no) fit with the rest, of the 
Commission's collection, she recommends th 
be auel iciiiei] and that the Commission fake 
proceeds . 



t from 
iJ 

t. the 
I to 
t i oris 



at i t 
the 



Commissioner Mealy requested thai in the future 
the actual work be brought before the committee 
rather than a photograph. 



Commissioner haliocea movec 
t lie pa i n I i ug i li to I he col I 
Boas seconded. I t was so 



to decl ine accepting 
•c I ion. Commissioner 
loved . 



Commissioner Ilea I y moved to approve auctioning 
the work and accepting proceeds from the sale. 
Commissioner haUoeea seconded. It. was so moved 



Art. Kn r i oilmen I : Library 

'I' he committee was presented with a progress report, on 
Nay land Hlake and Ann Hamilton and Ann Chamberlain's 
designs for the main library. 

Nay I and It I like : 

Nayland Hlake presented a prototype model of his 
individual lamps as well as a model of how the lamps 
would look mi the wall. lie said that the lamps have 
undergone add i t ional design changes since the 
prototype was manufactured. 

While his original proposal called for alabaster, the 
stone could not be rill thin enough without breaking. 
Instead he will be using white or green sandblasted 
glass. The shades wi I I be curved to about 2" back 
from the wa I I . The lamps will lie screwed into the 
wall instead of clipped and the edges of the fixture 
will be perforated metal. The names will be in gold 
leaf on the front, of the shade for a nice transition 
between day and night . 



VAC 2/20/9 lsp 



I'fige 



Blake said that one of the issues he had discussed 
with Kathy Page from the library was the issue of 
maintenance in terms of the cost of changing the 
lamps. He said that he thought his "endowment plan" 
for- the next phuse would help support the maintenance 
costs of the piece. 

What Blake proposes is a process by which individuals 
or groups can donate works of an author and make an 
additional donation of funds to cover costs of 
manufacturing a new lamp as well as 
contributing to the maintenance fund of the piece. 

Concerns were expressed regarding the review process 
for accepting such donations. It was agreed that the 
artist will work with staff to develop a plan to be 
presented at the March 20th meeting. 

Questions were asked regarding the safety of the 
lamps, i.e. could children grab them from the stairs 
or touch the electrical outlets. Blake replied that 
at the closest point, a balustrade keeps people from 
being able to get to the lamps. The electrical 
outlets are recessed 3' into the wall. 

Ann Hami 1 ton : 

Jennifer Sage gave an update on Anne Hamilton and Ann 

Chamberlain's proposal. 

She reported that the artists still want to look at 

the Larkin St. entrance with the whispering gallery. 

They still want lo work with the floor, but the 

feasibility of this in terms of costs is in question. 



A new area that they are working with is the long 
diagonal wall that, echos the Market St . geometry. 
The wall appears in I he same place on every floor- 
is quite prominent.. Each floor has a different 
subject that they can incorporate. 



and 



Because of architectural design changes, the artists 
will not. be able lo use the Heading Room vestibules 
as they had originally planned, 

Susan Pont, inns referred the committee to the 
preliminary costs estimates in the proposal. Firm 



VAC 2/20/91 sp 



Page - :i 



figures for all I he artists' cost! 
to t he fommi I Ipc in March. 



will be presentee! 



A 1 i ce 
Jenn i f 
which 
theme 
t ree i 
g row i n 
va r i on 
arch i t 
t er lino 
t he .1 i 
mean t 
They c 
also i 
be t wee 



Ayrnc 
e r S a 
f ea t u 
of th 
n I he 
i? on 
s wor 
ec t u i 
logic 
verse 
to su 

Oil 1 d 

ncorp 

n $10 



k: 

go presented Alice Aycock's new proposal, 
res a sculpture in the tjanlen area. The 
e sculpture is the Tree of Life Myth. The 

center- of the sculpture would have vines 
it . Several large spheres represent the 
Iris of the mind, for example, 
al and theatrical, cosmological , 
al, etc. Roller-coaster like loops unify 

element. s composi t ional 1 y and also are 
ggest a dynamic anti-gravi tat ional force, 
also be used for seating. The piece may 
orate a fountain. The cost is estimated 
(),»()() - $200,000. 



Sage reported that .iim Fried had met with Aycock in 
Paris and given her his comments. He thinks it is a 
good start, and is comfortable with continuing to 
work with her on it. 

Commissioner Boas expressed reservations about the 
sculpture and its proposed location in the courtyard. 
Commissioner Healy said that there were also safety 
issues to work out. She liked the tree of life idea, 
but was distressed that the piece was not working 
more with t ho structure of the building. 

It was generally agreed that the subject matter was 
appeal i ng , but that the work needs to be more 
integrated with the building. 

Lothar Haumgarten: 

Jennifer Sage presented Lothar Baumgarten ' s proposal. 

At the Grove St. entrance, he proposes a metal 
armature engaging the large glass wall which diagrams 
the prop., i l inns of typographical module 1,5 = 2 : 3 
after- which the Guttenberg Bible was designed. The 
diagram would play against the grid on the glass. A 
broken horizontal line and numbers 2:.\ will be etched 
in the glass. 

lie also proposed several designs for the central 
floor- area of the rotunda. Text, reading " Type is 
the Voice of the Printed Page" would be inlaid into 



VAC 2/2()/91sp 



Page - -I 



the terazzo or stone floors. His approach to the 
main floor is more feasible on a practical level than 
the one proposed by Hamilton and Chamberlain. 

The same text would be sandblasted or painted on the 
glass wall of the suspended Reading Room on the 4th 
floor. It would be readable from a number of areas 
in the library. 

Baumgarten also proposes making a parquet floor for 
the 5th floor Rare Book section and adjoining area. 
The design is based on the structure of the American 
typecase . 

Sage thought that Lothar Baumgarten had abandoned the 
idea of designing the railings. 

For the Grove Street glass wall he has proposed to 
sandblast a design that reflects the proportional 
system used to establish the layout of the book's 
page . 

Commissioner Boas commented that she felt 
Baumgarten ' s proposal for the entrance was very much 
in the spirit of the building. 

Sage said that Jim Fried is adamant that the artists 
take responsibility for the liability of the work and 
follow it through so that it. comes out in the way 
they intended. 



IV. 



By March 19th, all the proposals should be pretty 
much finalized (except, perhaps for Aycock's). Cost 
estimates should be completed and the Visual Arts 
Committee would then approve the projects and 
authorize entering into contracts for the second 
phase . 

Art Enrichment: Mental Health Facility 
Susan Pontious reported Lhal Hilda Slnim had further 
developed her plan for the interior- of the building, 
and that the client was now satisfied. 



Since most, of the building is given over to 
operational needs, the best way to address most of 
the interior is with approximately I .< individual 2- 
Dimensional works of art (approximately 22" x 30"). 
These works would be hung m t lit- family rooms, group 



VAC 2/20/91sp 



Page - f> 



rooms, nursing stations, offices, etc. The general 
criteria for the art works would follow the 
guidelines given by the client, and the work would 
represent a wide range of media and style. 

Five larger two-dimensional works had been specified 
for the receiving areas, main conference room, and 
perhaps the chapel. 

For the day rooms, Shum had proposed treating the 
columns with stenciled and stained patterns to give 
each area an identity. Pontious proposed that Shum 
should execute these herself. 

For the gym corridor, a tile piece was planned, 
possibly executed as part of the art ist- in-residence 
program . 

A hanging piece has been proposed for the lobby, 
which has 22' high ceilings. Both Mildred Howard and 
George Gonzales are interested in this piece. It was 
proposed that both should submit a design. 

Areas for the exhibition of patient art have also 
been identified; Shum will work with the architects 
regarding the design for the cases. 

Commissioner Healy asked for clarification about what 
was the original charge for Howard, Gonzales and 
Shum. Pontious replied that each was given a 
specific area for which they were supposed to develop 
a plan (i.e. Shum the interior; Howard the A.I.R. 
program, and Gonzales the landscape. ), and they were 
also supposed to develop at least one art work that 
they themselves would do. 

Besides the plan proposed for the interior, Gonzales 
and Shum had proposed replacing the gazebo eliminated 
from the architectural budget; Shum had proposed some 
sculptural lanterns for the courtyard; Gonzales had 
proposed a stone bench and ash urns; and Mildred 
Howard had proposed accent paving. Pontious reported 
that the paving was now an alternate and not included 
in the base bid, so this part of the project was in 
jeopardy . 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the conceptual 
art plan for the interior of the mental health 



VAC 2/20/91sp 



Page - 6 



f aci 1 ity . 
moved . 



Commissioner LaKocca seconded. It was so 



Commissioner HeaLy moved t.o approve authorization to 
begin solicit slides for the 2-1) i mens i onal work. 
Commissioner Boas seconded. It was so moved. 

Phyllis Harding, the project manager, expressed the 
hope that the artwork selected would be 
representative of the ethnic make-up of the cliental 
of Hie I'ac i I i ty . 

Art Enrichment: Islais Creek Pump Station 
Bruce Elynn from the Bureau of Architecture presented 
the plan for the enlargement of the South East Water 
Pollution ControJ Plant. He said it had not been 
determined what the art enrichment program would be, 
i.e. whether it would be integrated art work or two 
or three d i mens i una I works. However, since the 
actual const ruction area was not in a verj pub] Lc 
area, they would like to put the art in t lie 
administration building ol the s . K . plant (where the 
actual construction site is located). 

Discussion ensued regarding how much of the total 
construction costs were subject to be assessed for 
art enrichment funds . El ynn sa i .1 it tradi t ional 1} 
had been applied to just t. he "above ground" costs, 
but that this needed in b< . Larified. 

He reported that when I lie S.E. plant u a s originally 
built , the art enrichment requirement was waived, and 
the funds were used to build 1 be Hunter's Poinl 
Cultural Center. Commissioner boas expressed support 
for using the ail enrichment funds at the cultural 

(enl e I • . 

Commissioner Ilea I y re spend.-. I that the committee did 
not have enough informal ion to give direct tun, and 
thai i li.' projecl would have to come back when some 
more of the details bad been worked out with Jill 
Ma n I ii n . Speci f i cal 1 y , I he commi t te< wanted La know : 

1. what the Art Enrichment budget v. as and what part 
of the projecl was subject to art enri< hmenl . 

2. What lb. art program i al the Hunter's Point 
i n I t ii i ,i I Center i I whethet oi nol ar1 



VAC 



!/20/91sp 



Page 



enrichment funds might be able to be used to 
enhance that . 



VI 



Bruce 
col la 
compe 
He wa 
s e 1 e c 
t 1 1 1 1 w 
Comin i 
Com in i 
a 1 one 
an ar 



[• 1 
bo r 

I i n 

s r 
t ed 
i I h 

ss i 
ss i 
i n 
I i s 



ynn 

a I i o 
g ae 
once 

on 

who 
i >ne r' 
on d 
rul w 
t wi 



expressed concerns about art ist 
n on the building, relative to 
sthetics and conflict resolution, 
rned that an artist might be 
the strength of" their reputation, 
in it might be difficult to work. 

Healy assured Flynn t hat the 
id not select artists on reputation 
ould never insist that, he work with 
th whom he felt incompatible. 



Mural Awareness Week 

Susan Cervantes, Director of the Precita Eyes 
Mural ists, asked the Committee to proclaim 
"Mural Awareness Week", May 11-18, 1991, as an 
opportunity for the City to show off its mural 
heritage and encourage participation of its 
res i den Is and visitors to see and learn about 
nui ra 1 s . 

Commissioner Boas so moved. Commissioner 
LaRocca seconded. It was approved. 



She riff's Fac: 
Susan Pont i ou 
to change the 
because of hi 
rhe artist wa 
i nc 1 ude carpe 
lies i gn fee o f 
$21,910. The 
suggested t ha 
J i mi ted impac 
report ed that 
asking him t o 
this in f o rma t 
h i m . 



ii 



y 

por 

mun 

nee 

11 i 

ul 

250 

rt 

cha 

th 

ha 

oris 

S 



ted that Lt . 
ity Room from 
rn about acou 
ng to modi f y 
woul d requ i re 

plus t rave I 
from the acou 
nge to carpet 
e noise level 
d written to 
i de r his requ 
he had not he 



LaVigne wanted 
tile to carpet 

stic problems. 

her design to 
an additional 

for a total of 

stical engineer 
won 1 d have 

; Pont i ous 

Lt. LaVigne 

est in light o f 

a rd bac k f com 



The Committee decided to defer an> action until 
they had heard further from Lt. LaVigne. 

Pontious also requested that the committee 
approve en I er ing i nto contracts wi th Car] Cheng 

- 1 r 1 1 1 \i<l i Semi fni t h" fabricat ion phase of 
their project. She reported thai Doug llollis 



VAC 2/20/91 sp 



Page - 8 



wanted to include designing some furnishings in 
his second contract, but exactly what he would 
be doing had not yet be determined. Pontious 
reported that she would defer on the request for 
his contract until she had more information on 
what additional activities he would be proposing 
for this phase. 

Commissioner Boas moved to approve entering into 
contract with Vicki Scuri for the supervision of 
the fabrication phase of the plaza and lobby for 
$f>0 an hour + travel for a total amount not to 
exceed $19,960; and entering into a contract 
with Carl Cheng for oversight, and fabrication 
related to the atriums and south facade for 
$15,000 | t -e with .i materials budget not to 
exceed $30,600. 



Comm i ss i oner Ilea I y 



o n d e d , 



I t 



is so moved. 



VI I 1 



Progress Report: Kmbarcadero 

Commissioner Ilea I > reported that the selection 
[jane 1 for the Promenade Project had met and had 
se lee ted 11 sem i - f i na I i s t s . They are : \ i t o 
Acconci ; the group of Michael Davis, Buster 
Simpson, Richard Turner, and Susan 
Schwartzenberg ; Lloyd Kainrol and John Rock; the 
group of Anita Margrill, Michael Manwaring, 
Ke i Ko Pr i nee and Wi 1 1 I i am Cal loway ; 1 he group of 
Robert Miller, (iul.hrie an.) Duresch; John Roloff; 
Barbara Solomon and Sfanlej Saitowitz; Athena 

and I he team < 1 1 U rsa I a 
I u in 1 1 , John Randolph, Jim 
and Rung I. i u . 



'lac ha and Thomas Wang ; 
von Rydi ng sward , Burce 
Go 1 dbe rg , Tom Bonauro , 



Commissioner Boas i a i sed the issue thai when the 
Commission has on t.s i de panel s , the members o t 
t he Visual Arts Comm i I. tee I oose some of the i r 
i n [>ii I i ii t c art. i si sel ect ion. She t e It that 
perhaps mo re than one comm i t tee member should 
s i t mi I he pane I s . 

Comm i ssi oner ileal > countered that the meetings 
are open, and thai ui\ commi ss ionei maj attend 
i n a n advisory c a pa i i I y , but t h e j would not 1 1 a v . ■ 
a vote uii t i I it came be fori I In Visual Arts 
Commi t tee , or the lull Commi ss ion . 



VAC 2/20/91sp 



> ; 



Commi ks i oner Boas said, that as Liaison to the 

entire Rmbarcadero Project, she wanted to be 

notified of every meeting. She said John Kriken 
also wanted to be notified. 



Gal lery 

Anne Meissner reported thai unless the gallery finds 
a fiscal agent immediately, it will not be able to 
accept grants. This means that the gallery can not go 
ahead with their City Sites Programming, and the 
gallery itself can not operate past June. Meissner 
will be proposing to the Finance Committee that 
Friends of Support Services for the Arts at SOMAR act 
as fiscal agent for the gallery to handle new and 
restricted funds for- a period of 1 year. The Friends 
of Support Ser\ ices have agreed to act in this 
capac i ty . 

'ipiKmmi' also asked for approval for the ait isls 
proposed for the April Show, "Common knowledge". it 
was agreed that approval for Lhese art.ists would be 
introduced under- Committee Reports at. the March Art 
Commission meeting because Commissioner Mealy had to 
leave. The artists' slides and other materials would 
be reviewed by Commissioner's Boas and LaRocca. 
Based on their approval, Commissioner Mealy would 
recommend approval to the Commission under Committee 
Reports . 



F.x 
Ne 
To 
re 

c r 
v i 

at 

Th 

Fn 
St 
th 
t a 



p] or 
t f 1 e 

n i a 
ques 
eat e 

sua 1 
He a 

e l>; 

c 1 o w m 

op i 

At 

t i ] 



at. o 
shi 

Mac 

t ed 

a n 

1 V 
ch 
plo 

en i 
s o 
ts 



r i urn 
p's 

ne i 1 
app 

o r i 
i mpa 
and 
rat o 

for 

n pu 
Co mm 
aps 



Pro 



quest for Support for Will 
sal 
rted 
for 
i on 
t o f 



that the Explorator i urn has 
Will Nettleship's proposal to 

system that enables the 
Lnd their- way from the bus stop 
rick to and throughout the museum. 
r i uni is applying to the National 

the Arts for funding, and since the Bus 
hi lc property, they need approva] from 
i ss i on to site one of Nettleship's 
I here. 



Comni i ss i oner 
Conini i ss i one r 



SO moved. M was seconded by 

I t was so moved . 



VAC 2/20/91 sp 



ORDERS AND REPORTS 

1. Ordered: Approval of the Minutes of the Jan. 16th, 1991 
meeting of the Visual Arts Committee. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Approval of plaques proposed for the Holocaust 
Memorial based on Felix Warburg's judgement of the color 
to be used to accent the lettering. 

3. Ordered: To decline adding to the City's art collection 
the bequest of Mrs. Alice Ivaldi of a painting by Karl 
Emil Tehmohlsen. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: To auction the painting left to the Art 
Commission in the bequest of Mrs. Alice Ivaldi, and to 
accept the proceeds from the sale. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: To approve the conceptual art plan for the 
interior of the Skilled Mental Health Nursing Facility. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: To authorize the solicitation of artists' slides 
for the 2-dimensional artwork for the Skilled Mental 
Health Nursing Facility. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: To proclaim May 11-18, 1991, "Mural Awareness 
Week" . 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

8 . Ordered : 

a). To enter into contract, with Vicki Scuri for the 
supervision of the fabricat ion phase of the plaza and 
lobby of the New Sheriff's Facility for a fee of $50 an 
hour plus travel and sustenance for a total not to exceed 
$19 ,960 ; 



VAC 2/20/91 sp Page - 1 I 



b). To enter into contract with Carl Cheng for oversight 

and fabrication activities related to the atriums and 

south facade of the New Sheriff's Facility for a fee of 

$15,000 with a labor and materials budget not to exceed 

$30,600. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vote: Unanimous 

Ordered: To approve the project proposed by the 
Exploratorium and Will Nettleship to place a tactile map 
in the bus shelter at Beach and Broderick as part of an 
effort to create an orientation system that will enable 
the visually impaired to find their way from the bus stop 
to and throughout the museum. 
Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 



Respectful lySubini tted , 
>usan Ponlious 



Curator 



VAC 2/20/91sp 



Page 



12 



PE 1 ! COBB FREED & PARTNERS ttf SIN 



ION MARTIN-VEGUE WINKELSTEIN MORIS 

ASSOCIATED ARCHITECTS 



18 February 1991 



Dear Cathy and Jim: 

Sorry for the handwritten text. I hope the model arrived in good shape and 
in time. Conceptually, the idea centers around the Tree of Life Myth. The 
tree would have green and growing elements - vines, etc. and in part be a real 
tree and in part a theatrical illusion. The spheres represent various worlds of 
the mind, for example, architectural and theatrical, cosmological, 
technological, etc. The loops unify the diverse elements compositionally and 
also suggest a dynamic anti-gravitational force. They would be constructed of 
steel pipe (unlike the model) and could also be used as seating. I have also 
told Jim that I would design additional seating and some water elements, if 
this design concept "flies". The sculpture is intended to be symbolic in the 
sense that there are various realms of human mental constructs which are 
penetrated by some natural chaotic growing force. 

I hope this is sufficient to explain the idea. 

All the best, 



Alice Aycock 



600 MADISON AVENUE. NEW YORK, N I- W YORK 1 002 J I I I I III. >N I (212) : I I i I ; : PAX (2111 ! 
501 SECOND STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94107 TELEI'HONI 



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San Francisco 

Main Library 

Phase 2 Design Proposal 

by Chamberlain and Hamilton 
February 20, 1991 



This proposal focuses on the treatment of the surfaces of the 
library; its walls and floors. In each, text is embedded, incised, 
stamped, inscribed and etched creating a palimpsest of texts. 
These work as mapping systems locating one within the physi- 
cal space of the library aswell as within the contents of its 
collection. This proposal describes treatment of the flooring in 
the main atrium, and the entrance ways, and thresholds for the 
reading rooms. The treatment of the interior diagonal wall is 
described and a treatment for the walls of one reading room and 
the special collection room. 



V V 



J> 



Page 1 



Introduction 

Voice is to time what hand writing is to space. 

Susan Stewart 

This proposal describes a methodology and philosophical orientation 
to the treatment of text as pattern, phenomena, and meaning embed- 
ded within the surfaces of the proposed San Francisco Public Library. 

Our proposal proceeds from the idea that one locates oneself in text as 
one locates one's self on a map or within the spaces of a building. 
Our approach inverts the inside and outside of a book, displaying on 
public walls of the building the interior of the book. Text embedded 
into the walls and floors will form a pattern which circulates through- 
out the building and becomes increasingly individuated from the 
entrance way into the specialized reading rooms. This is a journey 
from the phenomena and origins of text to its specific meaning and its 
expression in stories. The process of compiling and layering of text 
which will be inscribed into the walls will involve consultation with 
the library staff and the participation of the diverse communities of 
San Francisco. 



Page 2 



The Entrance Ways: 

West Entrance (Larkin Street) 

The main entrance which faces City Hall, with its barrel vault and 
curved walls suggests ways the space could be acoustically focused so 
as to reflect back the voices and sounds of those entering the library. 
Like a giant mouth, this cave like entry way implies the beginnings of 
all expression in utterance and sound. Together, the curved surfaces 
of the ceiling vault and side vaults focus sound at the center of the 
space. Two alcoves or niches on either side of the lobby will have 
seats with acoustical mirrors behind them for focusing sound across 
the width of the lobby. Thus people can sit on opposite sides of the 
entry way carrying on conversations as the public enters and exits 
through the space. Conceptually, the focussing of the sound in this 
space centrally situates the individual and the individual voice. 

Floors 

Gray or green slate or terrazzo will be used as the floor material in the 
main entrance way. Sandblasted onto this surface will be a mapping 
system which diagrams the sound waves within the space; and indi- 
cates the point where the sound waves focus in the middle of the 
space. An additional pattern of pictographic language systems will be 
sandblasted (in stone) or embedded (in terrazzo) over the sound map. 
Further research and modification of the sound properties of the space 
will occur in consultation with Paul Doherty at the Exploratorium. 



Page 3 



Floor Treatment 

A terrazzo floor incised with lines will be laid in the exterior foyer at 
this north street entrance. The floor pattern is based on a nautical map 
with the principle compass points centered under the revolving doors. 
Here the pattern reinforces the different points of access to the build- 
ing. This floor may include incised text following the example of the 
Larkin Street Entrance. 

Atrium 

The atrium is a focus for circulation within the library, a point of 
convergence for the three entrance ways. As well as being the focus 
for circulation, the central atrium's glassed dome suggests an eye or 
celestial observatory. The floor below will be of green slate (or ter- 
razzo with cement enlays) which has been sandblasted with the image 
of a giant astrolabe: a medieval tool for mapping the movement of the 
stars, and ascertaining the time of day( See attached materials). The 
astrolabe pattern radiates from the stairwell which becomes the obser- 
vatory for the floor of the atrium. A second pattern radiates from the 
center of the circle to define the edges of the floor space. As with the 
entrance ways, language systems will overlay the star mapping sys- 
tems, referring to circulation and transformation of language over 
time. 

Method: 

Language systems will be generated on a computer with foreign lan- 
guage fonts. In consultation with artists and writers in the Bay Area, 
we will develop words and text from Cyrillic, arabic/farsi, Vietnamese, 
greek, cantonese, mandarin, korean, kanji, tagalog, and the romance 
language systems. These characters will be laser cut from plastic or 
metal and then attached to a matrix which will be embedded in the 
terrazzo forming words in ten or more different languages. From any 
viewpoint at any time a visitor to the library will be able to decipher 

Page 4 



words and characters in languages of the immigrants to the Bay Area, 
from the Pacific Rim, Russia and Siberia, Europe, and the picto- 
graphic languages of America, China and Japan. While we are still 
researching the feasibility of various materials, at this time plastic 
lettering seems to be the most flexible (color and cutting) and most 
cost effective. 

Further Development 

We will continue to explore the technique of embedding text into 
terrazzo as well as methods of etching or incising the terrazzo surface. 
In this next phase of design development we will work with the spe- 
cific collections of the San Francisco Public Library and with special 
librarians and members of the community in researching and develop- 
ing text for the floors and reading rooms. 

Community Involvement 

Essential in the development of the text is the involvement of writers 
from the community of the Bay Area. The following is the beginning 
of a list of writers and artists : 

Trinh T. Minh-ha Woman Native Other 
Maxine Hong Kingston Woman Warrior 

Tripmaster Monkey 
Jenny Lim Island 

Amy Tan Joy Luck Club 

Xam Cartier BeeBop Ree Bop 

Mildred Howard visual artist 

David Henderson poet 

Jose Montoya poet 

Amalia Mesa Bains artist and writer 

Harry Fonsica painter working with petroglyph 

imagery 
Julian Lang linguist, writer 

Page 5 



Victor Hernandez Cruz Bilingual Holes 
In addition, we will consult with a number of individuals with particu- 
lar knowledge of the history of the Bay Area and specific aspects of 
California history 

Gray Brechin historian 

Malcolm Margolin Ohlone Wav 

publisher of News from Native Cali 
fomia 
Pat Ferrero film maker 



Page 6 



Diagonal Wall 

The wall which extends vertically through the library forms a struc- 
tural divide in the library between the open stacks and electronic 
technology/compact stacks and special collections. The treatment of 
this wall on each floor will reiterate the development of language and 
writing as well as reflecting the specific collections housed on those 
floors. 

On the Main Floor, creating a mottled and striated surface, the walls 
will be patterned with graphite rubbings taken from beds of metal 
type. The rubbings will be embedded in pigmented artisan plaster and 
installed as tablets covering the entire wall and ceiling surface of the 
main entrance. With one story rubbed over the next, the text becomes 
phenomena, a naturalized texture of cultural traces. 

The Children's collection and reading room is housed behind the 
diagonal wall on the second floor. The walls will be made of sand- 
wiched glass with a lighting system behind it. The glass wall will 
contain hinged doors in which shadow puppets from different cultures 
as well as those fabricated by the children of San Francisco can be 
displayed. This will both reveal the functions behind the wall in the 
children's library as well as allude to the pictorial aspects of language 
and its beginnings in storytelling and performance. 

The second floor which is dedicated to general reference material the 
diagonal wall will be embedded with earliest pictorial representations 
of the area of San Francisco and the west coast of California These 
are maps made by early explorers in the area. Vitrines and lamps will 
protrude from the wall to illuminate the cases which contain books 
and materials from the permanent collection. 



Page 7 



Maps are descriptions of land which are European in origin and are 
tied to systems of dominion and ownership. The walls will be 
treated with tinted plaster and will be embedded with reproductions 
on vellum of maps from the library's collection. Incised over these 
images will be hand drawn place maps. These place maps will be 
developed in conjunction with a mapping workshop that focuses on 
the libraries map collection. As part of the process and discussion, 
participants will be invited to create place maps that describe their 
experience of their neighborhood. 

The Library's third floor houses audio visual materials of the art and 
music department. The diagonal wall will again be artisan plaster 
embedded with visual notation of sounds: from the human voice, bird 
songs or musical compositions. 

The fourth floor houses science and technology The wall on this floor 
will be sandwiched glass with sheets of various writing papers lami- 
nated between the glass. The lighting system in the glass wall will 
reveal the water marks on the paper. 

The fifth floor diagonal wall is stainless steel and faces the garden. 
Etched into the wall will be the names and images of plants from 
botanical illustrations which have disappeared from the Bay Area. 

Each of these wall treatments will entail research into the collection of 
materials currently in the library. The treatment of the diagonal walls 
on each floor will reveal the contents of the collections on each floor, 
turning the library inside out. 



PageS 



Reading Rooms 



Each of these rooms will reflect aspects of the tradition of marking 
and describing the world with alphabetic systems. The walls of these 
rooms will be surfaced with pigmented artisan plaster and will be 
treated as palimpsests: embedded with layers of text which relate to 
the individual function of each room. 

Literature Reading Room 

When history separated itself from story, it started indulging in accu- 
mulation and facts. 

-Trinh T. Minh-ha 

While the entrance ways of the building reflect the emergence of a 
written language and the phenomena of sound, the reading rooms 
present the expression of voice in stories and oral histories. 
The walls will be surfaced in parchment colored plaster which has 
been embedded with book pages. These pages will be selected from 
transcriptions of the oral histories in the library's holdings which 
record the story of immigrant journeys to San Francisco. 
The proportion of the printed page also determines the scale for the 
ochre colored slate in the threshold area of the floor surface. A radiat- 
ing map pattern will be sandblasted into the slate. Overlaying this 
pattern will be a pattern of text that moves from the edge of the room 
towards the center and consists of beginning lines from selected litera- 
ture. 

A quote about memory and storytelling will be inscribed in the wide 
band on the perimeter of the ceiling. 



Page 9 



Scholar's Room 

The Scholar's Room is the jewel box or vault of the library, containing 
all the rare and limited edition books and collections which have been 
donated to the library over the years. These books were the property 
of particular collectors whose passion was the acquisition of books, 
both as beautiful objects and as compilations of knowledge. 

The walls of the book room will be plaster embedded with sepia prints 
of pages from books in the Grabhorne Collection which traces the 
history and development of the book. Forming a dense grid on the 
wall, these pages will become background for engraved bookplates 
mounted in gilded frames and centered on each of the pages. This 
juxtaposition creates a relationship between the book as precious 
object in a system of connoisseurship, and the book as an object of 
circulating information. 

Special Collection Rooms 

While at this time we are proposing a specific treatment for only two 
of the special collection rooms, we suggest that all of them be given a 
similar treatment of pigmented artisans plaster, and that the floors at 
the thresholds be laid in a slate that is incised in parallel bands of text 
with alphabetic patterns that relate to the holdings of each particular 
room. 



Page 10 



Budget 



Diagonal Wall 

2 glass walls with lighting systems ** 

Children's Reading Room: hinged panels for display of shadow 
puppets 

3 walls: artisan plaster 

Main floor 850 s. f.x $20 s. f. -4 
2nd floor 850 s. f. x $20 s. f. 

3rd floor 850 s. f. x $20 s. f. $51,000 

vitrines and lamps for display(2nd floor) $ 5,000 






4rJrn^tJ-M) 



1 wall etched stainless steel 850 s. f. 




$15,000 


Reading Rooms 








Artisan Plaster 


$20 square foot 


2000 s. f= 


$40,000 


Copy prints for transfer to sepia 




$ 2,000 


Sepia Prints 






$ 5,000 


*- 400 gold frames 






$ 8,000 


Slate flooring 


$25 square foot 


600 s. f.x 3 = 


$45,000 


Sand blasting 


$20 square foot 




$36,000 




$81,000* 


Terrazzo 


$12 square foot: 


1800 sf. 


$21,600 


Embedded Text: 






** 



JV\ 



Foyer 



Sound consultant 5 hours $25/hour 

Architectural modification: ,. 

Flooring (includes central atrium, mezzanine and vestibules): 



$4-34 



Page 1 1 



Slate flooring $22 square foot 17,000 s.f = 

$374,000 

Sand blasting $20 square foot 1 7,000 s. f. 

$340,000 



$714,000* 
Terrazzo floor $ 12 per square foot x 17,000 s f 

$204,000 

Lettering: letters ranging in size from 3/4" to 2 ": 20 /sq. ft. 

cast in bronze: ** 

cast in zinc: ** ' 

plastic: $ 20,000 

Lettering: 

Laser foreign fonts: Cyrillic, arabic/farsi, Vietnamese, greek 
cantonese, mandarin, korean, kanji, tagalog, roman 

$790 
Laser Cutting of characters: ** ? 

Assembly of letter matrix 

Material Costs of project: $372,5 1 5 

Artists Commission= 20% of total cost of project $ 74,503 

plus subcontracted work AC 



Total $447,018*** 

*cost of stone flooring has not been budgeted: slate flooring will cost approximatel 
$600,000 more than a terrazzo floor 
**estimates for these costs have not yet been determined 
***total budget will change once above estimates have been determined 



Page 12 



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Geoffrey Chaucer: Amateur Astronomer? 

Tom Carter, Georgia Southern College, Statesboro, Georgia 



THE POET Geoffrey Chaucer is more 
commonly associated with literature 
and the development of the English lan- 
guage than with science. However, many 
studies address his interest in astronomy and 
the use of astrological imagery in his poetry; 
also, there is some suggestion that Chaucer 
was himself an amateur astronomer. 

Of the many excellent works which 
discuss the poet's knowledge of astronomy, 
only those of Hamilton M. Smyser, Derek J. 
Price, and S. W. Harvey leave the possibility 
open that Chaucer made any observations of 
his own. However, they do not stress his 
status as an observer, nor do they seem to 
think that his personal stargazing has any 
bearing on the interpretation of his works. 
Literary interpretation being beyond the 
scope of this article, the proposition here is 
only that Chaucer was indeed an active ama- 
teur astronomer, rather than merely curious 
about astronomical lore. Unfortunately, 
there is no direct evidence for this proposal; 
what this article offers is only an impression, 
but one that seems reasonable. 

The Treatise on the Astrolabe, dated 
about 1391, offers the best insight into 
Chaucer's relationship with astronomy. It 
was ostensibly written as instructions for a 
"suffisant" astrolabe which the poet had 
| given to his son Lewis. Basically a Middle 
' English adaptation of Compositio et Opera- 
tio Astrolabii. the Latin edition of an anony- 
mous work long but erroneously attributed 
to Messahala. it is both a rare example of 
Chaucer's free prose and 14th-century Eng- 
lish popular scientific writing. 

Chaucer completed only the first two of 
five planned parts of the Astrolabe. What 
exists now is an introduction, a detailed de- 
scription of the astrolabe the work accom- 
panied, and a series of 46 "conclusions" or 
operations that could be performed on that 
instrument. According to the introduction, 
the third part was to have been a table of 




stellar positions, declinations of the Sun. 
and the latitudes and longitudes of various 
cities; the fourth, tables and formulas for 
determining the motions of celestial bodies; 
and the fifth, an introduction to the theories 
and rules of astrology. 

Because the Astrolabe is an expository 
work, it is more likely to reflect Chaucer's 
own approach to his subject. If that is the 
case, then Chaucer seems congruent with to- 
day's amateur astronomer in three areas: his 
simple yet technical treatment of the topic, 
his knowledge of the instrument in use, and 
his dedication to the science of astronomy 
rather than to the art of astrology. 

The introduction to the Astrolabe closely 
parallels the style of today's popular scien- 
tific writing. Addressed to "Lyte Lowys my 
sone." these first words establish the theme 
as that of a father passing on a beloved in- 
terest to his child. Chaucer may have been 
quite honest in that motive, or he may 
have used the theme as an excuse to write 
in English at a time when serious works 
were written exclusively in Latin. In either 
event. Chaucer did not intend Lewis to be 
the sole recipient of the Astrolabe, for he 
wrote in the introduction. "Now wol I preie 
mekelv every discret persone that redith or 
herith this litel tretys. . . ." That entreaty 
belies (but does not negate) the address of 
the work and reveals his intention of pub- 
lishing it. 

The opening lines of the Astrolabe in- 
troduce two stylistic guidelines — language 
both understandable and simple — fol- 
lowed today by writers as diverse as Carl 
Sagan and Owen Gingerich. Chaucer writes 
in English ("for Latyn ne canst thou yit hut 
small") and in an elementary syntax ("hard 
sentence is ful hevy at onys for such a child 
to lerne"). These precepts are basic to any 
popularizer of science, ancient or modern. 

Although Chaucer opens the work in a 
paternal mood, he closes the introduction 



A sketch of an astrolabe 
appear! at lower right 
in this early manuscript 
copy of Ceoffrev Chau- 
cer's treatise. Owen 
Gingerich took thii pic- 
ture at the Houghton 
library of Harvard 
rniversitv. It is repro- 

duccd bi permission 




"*•!. ^1! 



with a declaration implying a much broader 
purpose. The last words of the introduction 
are, "And with this swerd shal I sleen 
envie." F. N. Robinson suggests that the 
line is nothing more than literary conven- 
tion, but perhaps Chaucer intended to slay a 
specific envy with a specific sword. The en- 
vy is that felt by an intelligent but un- 
schooled person interested in astronomy but 
whose curiosity is frustrated by his inability 
to read the Latin texts. The sword would 
then, of course, be English texts written 
plainly and simply. 

Chaucer's light tone, however, in no way 
detracts from the technical depth and accu- 
racy of the Astrolabe. The 46 conclusions 
cover astrometric and navigational deter- 
minations ranging from finding the position 
of the Sun to reckoning the tides. The 
Astrolabe is every bit as technical (allowing 
for Chaucer's use of Ptolemaic cosmology) 
as any modern guide to observational as- 
tronomy. 

When considering the technical depth of 
the Astrolabe, one must keep in mind that it 
was designed to be an owner's manual for a 
specific instrument, and not a general as- 
tronomical reference. Both the physical and 
the functional descriptions were tailored to 
the tool Chaucer gave to Lewis. Through- 
out the work, the references to the device it- 
self give the impression that it was large 
enough to perform all the operations, but 
not so large as to provide all the accuracj <A 
which "so noble an instrument" was capa- 
ble. Such a tool was probably the 14th- 
century equivalent of a common amateur 
telescope, perhaps a 4-inch refractor or an 
8- inch reflector. 

Unfortunately, the Astrolabe contains no 
direct comparison of Lewis' instrument to 
those in use by court astronomers. There 
jre ,i leu remarks, though, *hich illuminate 
the qualiis .>t the gift, Chaucer calls n ,i 

"suffisant \strolabie ai For our orizonte, 

COmpowned .iftcr the latitude of Oxen 
forde." The adjective tu/Jicitnt is Irustrat- 
ingly ambiguous, but it docs connote a 
mistiest Instrument Also, in Part I. Section 

in. he hints at the mediocrit] of the astro 

labc when he Mates that it has the drclina 

tion circles graduated t>>r oers ion degrees, 

whereas on other instruments this .ire 
marked Ofl bj one two. ,.r Ihrce decrees, 
"alter Ihc quantitc ol the Astrcl.ibir " 

In the Uih century the astrolabe ".is .i 



Id. rut v 



(o 2 { * M t M|_ 



6 tte otitic- 

atari nil- ^J^u thAM*.**ll**> 



$ 



"2- 



IS 



r,E?OMT S.04 



City and County of San Francisco 




Department of Public Works 
Bureau of Architecture 



January 30, 1991 

Job Number: 1229W 

Job Title: Islais Creek Pump Station 

Subject: ART ENRICHMENT 



Ms. Jill Manton 
Art Enrichment Committee 
San Francisco Arts Commission 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 200 
San Francisco, California 94102 

The Clean Water Program is enlarging its operations at the South East Water Pollution 
Control Plant with a new headworks building within the plant boundary and a new 
pump station across the street. The pump station is similar to the Westside, Channel 
and Griffith pump stations and we expect to negotiate a fee for art work in a similar 
manner to these previous projects. The Art Enrichment budgets were roughly 2% of 
the above ground structure for those projects; preliminary estimates of this building 
are between three and five million dollars. Therefore the Art Enrichment would be 
between sixty and one hundred thousand dollars for the pump station. Art Enrichment 
for the headworks building would be exempted under previous agreements whereby the 
Art Enrichment monies for the South East Plant were used to build the adjacent 
community college. 

As the Islais Creek Pump Station is located in an obscure area of the city, primarily 
filled with warehouses and auto wrecking yards, the Clean Water Program would like 
to propose use of the Art Enrichment funds to buy a minimum of ten paintings to be 
incorporated into the City's collection. Such California Artists as William Keith, 
Wayne Thiebaud, Roland Peterson and Michael Tompkins could be purchased. The 
paintings could be used to enhance the Clean Water Program offices for a minimum of 
five years and then be rotated into general circulation by the Arts Commission with a to 
be determined maximum on loan at any one time. 

Enclosed is a site map showing the adjacent warehouses, freeway, and sewage 
treatment plant along with some preliminary elevations. The project manager, Mr. 
Harold Coffee, and the architect, Mr. Bruce Plynn, would like to meet with you to 
discuss the fees and possible artists as soon as is convenient. 



BF:mh 

cc: 265,300(2) 



Very truly yours, 

Normafi M. Karasick 
City Architect 



(415) 554-6512 



Room 265. City Hall 



San Francisco 94102 



■i^nln ^ *«*J*1 jrrwt Til 4 




Precita £yes Mural Arts Center 

348PRECITA AV., SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 94110 PHONE: 285 2287 



February 20, 1991 



To: Arts Commission of San Francisco 
25 Van Ness, Suite 70 
San Francaisco, CA 94103 



Dear Art Commissioners, 

I am pleased to announce a San Francisco "Mural Awareness Week", 
May 11-18. A great opportunity is at hand for the City to show off 
its' mural heritage and encourage participation of all its residents 
and visitors to see and learn about murals. These monumental treasures, 
past and present, are recognized as some of the finest in this country 
and deserve your recognition. On behalf of the mural community and 
organizers of this event, I request that the Arts Commission of San 
Francisco proclaim May 11-18 "Mural Awareness Week". We hope to see 
you all at one or more of the scheduled mural events. (Please see the 
attaached announcemnt for more information) 

Thank you for your support. 



Sincerely, 

..3 art UmJo^Z^ 

san Cervantes, Dir. 
Precita Eyes Muralists 




P recti a Eyes Mural Arts Center 

348PRECITA AV., SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94110 PHONE: 285-2287 



February 14, 1991 Contact: Susan Cervantes, Dir. 

285-2287 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Precita Eyes Muralists Association and the "MUROS" Exhibition 
Committee will co-sponsor a "Mural Awareness Week" for the purpose of 
celebrating our heritage of monumental mural art, past and present, 
in the San Francisco Bay Area, and the current release of the new book 
"San Francisco Murals" by Tim Drescher. The week long event will offer 
the visitor and public daily City-wide mural walks and tours, a mural 
symposium, exhibitions, and opportunities to meet the muralists and 
see them creating new works. The week for this unique event is Saturday, 
May 11 through Saturday, May 18, 1991. 

The week long program will include the following special events: 

MURAL WALKS AND TOURS 

* Mission Mural Walks from the Precita Eyes Mural Arts Center. 

* San Francisco City Guides Tours of Coit Tower and Diego Rivera 

murals . 

* City-wide mural tours by Gray Line Tours. 

MURAL SYMPOSIUM AND BOOKSIGNING 

* A Mural Symposium will be hosted by a distinguished panel discussing 
the future goals of mural art in the Bay Area at the Mission Cultural 
Center. 

* Muralists reception and booksigning at the Mission Cultural Center 
to honor the mural artists and celebrate the newest book "San Francisco 
Murals" by Tim Drescher. 

MURAL EXHIBITIONS 

* 5 Mural Exhibitions will reveal the history, diversity, and present 
attitudes of the Community Muralists during the months of May and June 
at the following institutions. 

* Student Union Gallery, S.F. State University 

* "MUROS" Exhibitions at 

* Galeria Museo, Mission Cultural Center 

* Capp Street Project 

* SOMAR Gallery, South of Market Cultural Center 

* CARA Exhibition, S.F. Museum of Modern Art 

If you would like to participate please call the Precita Eyes Mural 
Arts Center at 285-2287 for more detailed information. 




San Francisco State University 

1600 Holloway Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94132 



Department of Humanities 

(Interdisciplinary) 
415/338-1830 



February 19, 1991 



Dear Susan, 



I certainly support the idea of a San Francisco Mural 
Awareness Week May 11-18. The City deserves it, so its 
neighborhood residents can both learn about murals and see them 
given respect by officials. Visitors from all over the world come 
to see San Francisco's murals, and it is high time the City's 
elected and appointed officials demonstrate they know what civic 
treasures these works are. What better way than to take public 
note for an entire week? The monumental community artworks deserve 
this recognition. 

The muralists of San Francisco also deserve the recognition 
such a week would bring. Muralists put in hundreds of unpaid hours 
per mural out of a sense of commitment to the community. They 
certainly have earned a week's public, official notice of their 
efforts. My own belief is that the City and its residents benefit 
together when public examples of cultural diversity can be 
celebrated collectively. 

If I can help in any way, please do not hesitate to give me 
a call . 



Timothy W. Drescher 



Ity s University 



SAN FRANCISCO MENTAL HEALTH SKILLED NURSING CENTER 



OUTLOOK 

Our point of departure for designing an art plan for the Skilled 
Mental Health Nursing Facility was that art should be an 
expression of healing. For that reason, we have proposed works 
that celebrate the natural world, and use tactile, sensual materials 
that bring the spirit of nature throughout the facility. We have 
sought to propose projects that encourage patient interaction when 
possible, and yet are safe and will withstand heavy handling to 
become even more beautiful with age, polished with the patina of 
human touch. 

We have invoked the ancient 5 Element Theory which permeates 
Chinese thought and medicine (Air/Fire, Earth, Metal, Wood, Water) 
as an underlying philosophy that guided our approach. We also 
were inspired by the practice of Feng Shui, which frequently uses 
reflective materials and prisms to enhance stagnant spaces and 
elevate the level of CHI, or life energy. 



ARTIST ROLE 

* Coordinate Interior art program 

* Assist curator in reviewing artists/artwork 

* Assist curator in determining placement of artwork throughout 

facility 



ART PROGRAM FOR THE INTERIOR 

The interior of the mental health facility will be accentuated with 
3 major commissions in areas that were determined to have high 
impact and visibility for the patients and general public. 
The main sites are: 

-the main lobby on the ground floor 

-the gym wall on the 1st floor 

-the columns in the dayrooms on the 1st and 2nd floors. 
In addition to these main commissions, other areas throughout the 
facility with patient or staff activity will be enriched with 
Individual 2-Dimensional Works Sites to exhibit patients' artworks 
will also be recommended. 



LOBBY 

The main lobby is a stunning glass enclosed space with a 22 ft. high 
ceiling. While impressive in height, the loftiness can create an 
intimidating space with cold glass walls. The area can be softened 
with a large hanging art piece (suspended from the celling) that 
will not only bring color, light and playfulness to the space but also 
humanize the scale of the lobby. The hanging sculpture can 
enhance and compliment the natural dynamics of the lobby by 
working with the light and scale to create a positive first 
impression. Structural considerations will be coordinated with the 
architects. 

GYM WALL 

The gym wall on the 1st floor is In the midst of a busy corridor. 
The wall is 9 ft. high by 30 ft. long with a glass wall directly 
opposite overlooking the inner courtyard. The art can interact 
with the courtyard view and play with the interior/exterior 
dynamics. The art should be in the form of a series so that as the 
viewer passes through the hallway there is a sense of continuity or 
storytelling. The artwork can be a light sculpture, a wall 
sculpture, cast, reliefs or painted tile The creation of this artwork 
is under consideration with the Artist In Residence Program. 

DAYROOMS 

There are a total of 16 structural columns, each measuring 8 ft. 
in height with a 16" diameter. The columns are located on the 1st 
and 2nd floors with each floor divided into a north and south wing. 
The 16 columns are evenly divided between A sections The 
columns can be transformed from foreboding cylinders into art 
pieces by stenciling patterns or painting murals to depict, subject 
matter that reflects the cultural mix of the population. 
The artistic treatment of the columns will customize the 
environment and act as location designators for each of the A wings. 

INDIVIDUAL 2-DIMENSIONAL WORKS (Intent and function) 

The intent of this phase of the art program is to provide visual 
variety and vitality throughout the hospital The Individual 2- 
Dimensional Works will have equal impact and Importance as the 3 
main commlslons but will differ scale unci In methods of producton 
For example, the artworks will not be permanently anchored as in 
the case of the hanging sculpture In the lobby or be created 
specifically at the site like the column murals 



The Medium and Scale 

Because most of the hospital Interior is given over to operational 
use, an analysis of the space indicates that much of the facility 
would be best addressed through smaller, 2-dimensional works such 
as paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, textiles or wall reliefs. 
The scale of the artworks will range from approximately 22" x 30" 
to 36" x 60" depending on available wall space. All artworks will be 
framed in plexiglass boxes as per commission conservator 
specifications. See chart and blueprints for distribution. 

Criteria and Subject Matter 

The collection assembled under this program should be culturally 
diverse and represent a variety of media and artistic approaches. 
In all cases the art selected will respect the criteria outlined in the 
client guidelines with regard to form and imagry and be in keeping 
with the theraputlc goals of healing. To provide a cohesive 
decorative plan, the artworks would also be selected to compliment 
the hospital interior color scheme. 

In general, artworks falling into four major catagories will be 
sought: 

1) landscapes and cityscapes evocative of Bay Area environs 

2) figurative works that depict positive social interaction and/or 
promote a positive self-image 

3) still lifes 

4) serene or meditative abstract compositions 



Selection Process 

A project prospectus will be drafted describing the Mental Health 
Facility and its function in the community The prospectus will be 
a summary of the Individual 2-Dlmenslonal Works Program and 
will specify the clinical criteria, subject matter and the ranges of 
size and medium. The brochure will be distributed throughout the 
visual arts community. Additional interest in the project will be 
generated by placing advertlsments in Artweek Other resources for 
artist solicitation are: slide libraries in art Institutions or colleges 
such as at the S.F. Art Commission or Mills College, and referrals 
from arts organizations, arts administrators or individuals 
Interested artists will respond with slides which will be reviewed 
by a curator and Hilda Shum A list of artists and slides will be 
compiled and the actual space available in the hospital facility will 
be reevaluated before submitting a recommendation to the Visual 
Arts Committee for the final number and placement of artworks. 



Selection Process (continued) 

The Visual Arts Committee and client will identify works for direct 
purchase and /or artists to commission new works. The client and 
committee will review actual works before approving purchase. 

In order to hedge the inflationary cost of artwork during the 
construction period of the hospital, artist selection and solicitations 
should begin in 1991. The selection process should have several 
screenings and an ongoing list of possible artists maintained during 
the course of the program. Final placement of the artworks will 
not be curated until the completion of the project. 

Recommended Sites for Patient Artwork. 

Areas for exhibition of patient artwork from the AIR program or 
art therapy programs are recommended at sites with patient 
traffic. These sites are: 

- the patient dining room 

- the corridor east of the adolescent area 

- the corridor south of the gym wall 

(Please see 1st Floor Plan Support West on blueprint for locations). 



TIME LINE FOR ART PROGRAM 

1. Lobby Commission - solicitaion, selection and production - 1991 

2. Gym Wall - AIR program (?) 

3. Column Murals - solicitaion and selection 1991 

- production of murals Is when facility Is at 
approplate stage 

4. Individual 2-Dimensional Works - solicitation, selection - 1991 

thru completion of project 



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City and County of San Francisco 




Department of Public Works 
Bureau of Architecture 



January 30, 1991 

Job Number: 1229W 

Job Title: Islais Creek Pump Station 

Subject: ART ENRICHMENT 



» 



Ms. Jill Manton 
Art Enrichment Committee 
San Francisco Arts Commission 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 200 
San Francisco, California 94102 

The Clean Water Program is enlarging its operations at the South East Water Pollution 
Control Plant with a new headworks building within the plant boundary and a new 
pump station across the street. The pump station is similar to the Westside, Channel 
and Griffith pump stations and we expect to negotiate a fee for art work in a similar 
manner to these previous projects. The Art Enrichment budgets were roughly 2% of 
the above ground structure for those projects; preliminary estimates of this building 
are between three and five million dollars. Therefore the Art Enrichment would be 
between sixty and one hundred thousand dollars for the pump station. Art Enrichment 
for the headworks building would be exempted under previous agreements whereby the 
Art Enrichment monies for the South East Plant were used to build the adjacent 
community college. 

As the Islais Creek Pump Station is located in an obscure area of the city, primarily 
filled with warehouses and auto wrecking yards, the Clean Water Program would like 
to propose use of the Art Enrichment funds to buy a minimum of ten paintings to be 
incorporated into the City's collection. Such California Artists as William Keith, 
Wayne Thiebaud, Roland Peterson and Michael Tompkins could be purchased. The 
paintings could be used to enhance the Clean Water Program offices for a minimum of 
five years and then be rotated into general circulation by the Arts Commission with a to 
be determined maximum on loan at any one time. 

Enclosed is a site map showing the adjacent warehouses, freeway, and sewage 
treatment plant along with some preliminary elevations. The project manager, Mr. 
Harold Coffee, and the architect, Mr. Bruce Flynn, would like to meet with you to 
discuss the fees and possible artists as soon as is convenient. 



BF:mh 

cc: 265,300(2) 



Very truly yours, 

Norman M. Karasick 
City Architect 



(415) 554-6512 



Room 265. City Hall 



San Francisco 94102 



City and County ot San Francisco 



Art Commission 




Memorandum 



Claire N. Isaacs 
DIRECTOR 



Date: 
To: 
From: 
Subject: 



February 14, 1991 
Honorable Commissioners 
Tonia Macneil 



Briefing and Interviews for Moscone Center 
Finalists 




The proposal phase for the Moscone Center/Howard Street 
finalists will begin with an all-day briefing followed by 
interviews on the second day for the finalists. 

The goal of the briefing is to provide in-depth 
information to the artists as the basis of their proposal; 
for the site. I am in the process of coordinating the 
meetings and have been working with the CAO ' s office to 
develop an agenda and list of participants for the 
briefing. At this point it appears that the day-long 
meeting will include the 5 teams (which involves 12 
people), 8 agencies and yourselves. The agencies which 
will participate are: 

The CAO's Office: Germaine Wong 

Ray Fong , Technical Manager for 
Moscone Expansion 

S.F. Redevelopment Agency 
Gensler and Associates 

Moscone Convention Center Management and Programming 
S.F. Convention and Visitors Bureau 

TODCO (Tenants and Owners Development Corporation) 
Department of Parking and Traffic 
Department of Public Works 

A tentative agenda of the briefing is enclosed. At this 
point it may be adjusted to accomodate various schedules 
if necessary. You may wish to be present only for the 
time allocated to the Commission or for any other part of 
the day, particularly the noontime tour and lunch. 



(415)554-9671 



25 VAN NESS AVE. SUITE 240 



SAN FRANCISCO. 94102 



The interviews on the second day will be conducted by the 
members of the Selection Panel and advisors. I will need 
your advice as to a list of potential questions for the 
candidates. The interviews will probably be 45 minutes to 
1 hour in length, which means a morning and most of an 
afternoon should be set aside. Lunch will be served on 
the second day as well. 

Three potential weeks have been identified at this point: 

March 11-15 
March 18-22 
April 1-5 



In order to coordinate this meeting, I will need your help 
in identifying possible dates as soon as possible. 
Hopefully we will be able to do this at the Visual Art 
Committee Meeting on Wednesay. 



10 am 
10:15 
10:30 
11:00 
12:00 
1 :00 

2:00 

2:15 

2:45 

3:00 

3:15 

4:00 



JjggS ^g-^NViNIIQN _CENTER/HOWARI) STREKT 
ART ENRICHMENT PROGRAM 

BRIEFING OF FINALISTS 

10 AM TO 4 PM 

Arts Commission-Introduction 

CAO's Office 

Redevelopment 

Gensler and Associates 

Tour of Moscone Center/Howard Street 

Lunch 

Arts Commission-Commissioners 
TODCO 

Moscone Convention Center-Programming 
Convention and Visitors Bureau 
Traffic, DPW, CAO's Technical Management 
Adjourn 



City and County 
of San Francisco 




February 7, 1991 
Jason Yuen 



25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 Hox R0Q7 

(415)554 9671 



San Francisco International Airport 

Box 8097 

San Francisco, CA 94128 

Dear Jason; 

T ' m looking forward to working with you and Stanley 
ArtAonos Mattison and Bill Coblentz on issues relating to the 
airport art enrichment program. As you know, the so- 
called Joint Committee" was disbanded several years ago, 
commissioners but in September, my Commission approved forming an 
BarbaraSkiar steering committee (renamed the Airport Art Advisory 
P,esldont Committee) as I defined in the master plan outline I sent 

vice7,e^ent yOU \ n October - Commissioner Bob LaRocca has been 

a PP°inted as the Commission liaison, and Bebra Lehane and 

Vernon Alley T . , , , , 

Stanley Eicheibaum l w x 1 1 De the staff members. 

Kim Fowler 

Daniel Genera , . 

AnneHeaiy As vou know, I have proposed developing a master plan for 

John Kriken the art enrichment program for the airport that would deal 

Robert F. LaRocca , . , . , . ■ 

Amaiia Mesa Bains. Ph.D. comprehensively with issues of planning, policy and 

Rai v Okamoto , procedure relative to both the existing collection and the 

•"■•^le Rosekrans ... , 

commissioning of new works. As I envision it, the Airport 
Art Advisory Committee ( AAAC ) would be responsible for 
developing this policy with the help of other consultants. 
To refresh your memory, I have enclosed another copy of my 
Fine Arts Museum master plan outline (slightly updated), which defines the 

library Commission. ■ . . , . , . , . . . 

committee s responsibilities. 



4 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 
Presidents o( the 



Planning Commission 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



What I would recommend for the first meeting of the AAAC 
is review and discussion of this master plan outline 
proposal . 



PROGRAMS 



My goal for this master planning process is to have the 
Arts Festivals opportunity to look at the airport, art program 

cmc An collection who 1 i st ical 1 y . This way individual artworks, whether 

Civic Design Review ' * 

Neighborhood Arts they are part of the existing collection or new 

D°^ S )!TS honvConcem comMii ssions, can be evaluated within the context of a 

Public Art Program ' 

street Artists licenses comprehensive policy. The planning process will also give 
us the opportunity to re-evaluate the program and develop 

Suite430 fresh approaches for addressing issues of mutual concern. 

Sate Local Partnership 
415554-9677 

ArtHouse I will give you a cal 1 soon about schedul i ng our first 



415-554-9679 



mee t i ng . 



Arts Commission Gallery q ; _„„__ 1 v 
155 Grove Street oj.iii.ei> 

415-554-9682 f 

Susan Pont ions 
fin rat or 



-i 




cc: Commissioner LaRocca 




San Francisco International Airport 

GATTWA* TO THE PACIFIC 

February 6, 1991 



Ms. Margie O'Driscoll 

Acting Director 

Arts Commission 

City & County of San Francisco 

25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Ms. O'Driscoll: 

As you know, we are preparing a Master Plan to guide the Airport's development for 
the next fifteen years. To meet the demands of the traveling public, this Master Plan 
calls for a series of major capital improvement projects. These projects, in turn, will 
generate over $10 million for art procurement. 

In view of the need to coordinate the planning and implementation of this art program, 
the Airports Commission is requesting that the Joint Committee between the Arts 
Commission and the Airports Commission be re-activated. On February 5, 1991, the 
Airports Commission appointed the following people to serve in the committee 
representing the Airport: 

J. Stanley Mattison -- Airports Commissioner 

William K. Coblentz -- Former Airports Commissioner 

Alternate: Athena Tsougarakis -- Former Airports Commissioner 

Jason G. Yuen -- Airport Staff Member 

Alternate: John Costas -- Airport Staff Member 

Since 1979, the Joint Commitice has been instrumental in resolving issues between the 
Airport and the Arts Commission. The impending program to purchase and install 
millions of dollars' worth of art at the Airport requires new policies, procedures, and a 
comprehensive procurement plan. 



SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AtHPOHT SAN FRANCISCO CAIIFORNIA 34178 IMPHONf 14151 761 0800 FAX 14! SI 876 787b 



February 6, 1991 
Ms. Margie O'Driscoll " 2 " 



P,ease contact Jason Yuen at 737-7700 to arrange a "T**^ ^ T 
Committee to reconvene. The Airports ^^IZl an enrichment program, 
working closely with the A«s Commission m the forthcoming 

Smcerely, 




A Turpen 
Director of Airports 



cc: Airports Commission 
W. Coblentz 
A. Tsougarakis 
J. Yuen 
J. Costas 



City and County 
of San Francisco 




MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



February 6, 1991 
„.. ., , Lt. Michael LaVigne 

25 Van Ness Avenue r , . . n b"»- 

Suite240 uapitai improvements 

San Francisco. CA 94102 Rm . 333 
(415)554-9671 „ . . ,. , , 

City Hall 

Dear Lt. LaVigne; 

As per our conversation yesterday regarding the 
substitution of carpet for tiles in the Sheriff's Facility 
community room, I have had further discussions on the 
matter with the artist and Woody Jones, and checked with 

commissioners the architects regarding their timeline for issuing 

Barbara suiar addendum to the bid package. 

President 

Nancy Boos Based on these discussions, 1 am writing to ask if you 

Vice President -,, .. ,. „,„-,-,. 

would reconsider substituting carpet for the following 

Vernon Alley t>o o o .-,.-> o 

Stanley Elchelbaum reasons. 

Kim Fowler 

AnneHeaiy' Scuri's tile design for the entire facility, including the 

johnKriken community room has been the product of months of work. It 

Robert F, LaRocca u ■ j .*> ■ i ^ e> i . i ^ • • ^ • ^ 

Amaiia Mesa-eains. Ph.D. nas received final approval from both Civic Design and 
RaiY.Okomoto Visual Arts Committee, and cannot be changed without first 

jOodieRosekrans returning to at least Visual Arts for approval. 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 



As I mentioned on the phone, while the artist prefers her 
original design, she is amenable to redesigning the tile 
Fine Arts Museum pattern around a central carpet area, but would require an 
PiaXc^missL. additional design fee for this work. She would like to 
Recreation and Park upgrade the carpet from carpet tiles to a plush carpet 
Commission (green), and unify this room with the rest of her concept 
for the plaza and entry. 

DIRECTOR 

Claire N. Isaacs . 

Part of my concern around this redesign issue is that the 
^r^^r, o architects final deadline for an addendum is February 

PROGRAMS . , . 

Arts Festivals 22nd. I cannot authorize the design change, or the 

civic Art collection artist's fee, until it has been approved bv the Visual 

Civic Design Review . , . . , . , n i_ .-» *\.*_ i 

Neighborhood Arts Arts Committee, which does not meet, until Feb. 20th. 

pops Symphony concerts clear j y we w j)j not be able to meet the 22nd deadline, so 

Public Art Program , . , L i. ■ i ■ 

street Artists Ucenses the redesign would have to be a change order, which 1 
understand, is more complicated and costly. 

Suite 430 

Sate Local Partnership Despite these difficulties, we would not want to insist on 

415-554-9677 , , . , . , „ 

ArtHouse something that would cause an annoying noise condition for 

4)5-554-9679 ^ ne users of the room . However, the acoustical engineer's 

report (enclosed), indicates that substituting carpet for 
Arts Commission Gallery ^ n e tile would have a very minor effect on mitigating 

155 Grove Street . , 

415-554-9682 noise in the room. 



Another advantage of the tile to be considered is that it 
would not be subject to stains, and would continue to look 
beautiful over the life of the building. 

You mentioned your concern that moving chairs and tables 
back and forth over the floor would dig into the concrete. 
According to the artist, this particular concrete tile is 
very hard and would have a highly polished finish that 
would allow chairs to slide easily (and quietly). If the 
relative hardness of the tiles is really a serious 
concern, perhaps this issue can be addressed further. 

For all of these reasons, I think that you may want 
reconsider changing the room to carpet. I will put the 
matter on the Visual Arts Committee agenda for Feb. 20th. 
Before that meeting, would you please instruct me in 
writing how you would like me to proceed? 




iusan P 
Curator 



Woody Jones 
Joel Tomei 
Allen Leslein 



JAN-23-'9l UED 10:11 ID: TEL NO: 41536233112? HB11 P02 



PA0LETT1 



\ Mil*.. Ilk-. -Ill 1...I.I -l|l .-« 

,./.,„., MnliM.i-,., 

..../«. ,,.„//.„,;. i .,,,1.. "-»i:i:i 



■HV;"i.n|-| |„ v 



'-lr 



17 November 1990 

Mr. Allen Uslein |A N « -- 1q q n 

Williams + Tanaka JAN 2 1 1 

340 Pine Street ** hU 
San Francisco CA 94104 

Subject: Sheriffs Facilities, San Francisco 
PA Project 90105 

Dear Allen: 

This letter is to document our telephone conversation of Wednesday regarding the 
Community Meeting Room on the Grst floor of the new Sheriffs Facilities. 

My recommendation for acoustical wall treatment in this room is to mitigate the sound 
focussing condition caused by the curved glass block wall. It is Paoletti Associates's 
experience that this condition is generally considered annoying to people who must work 
with it. As acoustical consultants were are often called upon to correct such conditions. 
However that may be, the condition is not overwhelming. And it may be attended to at 
later date quite easily. The application of sound-absorptive treatment on the walls Is an 
easy fix. 

It has been suggested that carpeting this room would in some way compensate for the 
focussing effect of the curved wall. Whatever benefits may gained from carpeting the room, 
they will not mitigate the effects of the focussing problem. This is because the effect is a 
horizontal phenomenon not affected by the floor condition. 1 am assuming, of course, that 
an acoustical ceiling is scheduled for this room for general occupam noise control. Eiiher 
the carpet or the wall treatment will provide additional general occupant noise control, but 
only the wall treatment will help the focussing problem. 

1 trust I have answered your questions, please let me know if 1 can be of further assistance. 

Sincerely, 




Susan Pontious vicki Scuri 

San Francisco Arts Commission 6712 Division NW 

I 5 V ™ Ness Seattle, WA 

San Francisco, CA osin 

94102 

January 16, 1991 
Estimate for Construction Contract: 

I. Review of Shop Drawings and Coordination : 
40 hours @ $50./hr: $2,000. 

Scope includes review of all elements which affect or relate to the 
plaza and lobby scope of work, such as: all pavement details; poured- 
in-place concrete retaining walls and curbs; formliners; materials 
and paint specifications for vent; base board details for 
interior walls adjacent to the special paving; landscape plans; 
lighting plans & fixtures. 

II. Review of Pavement Units: 

10 hours @ $50./hr: $500. 

Airfare: Roundtrip Coach from Seattle or other to S.F.: $800. 

Rental Car: 1 Day @ $45./Day: $45. 

Per diem: 1 Day @ $85./Day: $85. 

Total: $1,430. 

III. On Site Review of Mock-up, Pavement Grid Layout & Installation of 
Pavers: 

160 hours @ $50./hr: $8,000. 

Airfare: Roundtrip Coach from Seattle or other to S.F.: $800. 

Rental Car: 4 weeks @ $125./wk: $500. 

Per diem: 26 days @ $85./day: $2,210. 

Total: $11,510. 

IV. Coordination and Review of Seating Elements: 

48 hours @ $50./hr.: $2,400. 

Airfare: Roundtrip Coach from Seattle or other to S.F.: $800. 

Rental Car: 3 days @ $45./Day: $135. 

Per diem: 3 days @ $85./Day: $255. 

Total: $3,590. 

V. On Site Final Review of all Work: 

10 hours @ $50./hour: $500. 

Airfare: Roundtrip Coach from Seattle or other to S.F.: $800. 

Rental Car: 1 Day @ $45./Day: $45. 

Per diem: 1 Day @ $85.: $85. 

Total: $1,430. 

Total Contract Amount: $19,960. 



SCOPE OF WORK DURING CONSTRUCTION PHASE: 
Carl Cheng, artist. Sheriff's 



: i 1 i t y F i o .i e 



HEL 1 0STA1 



stigate heliostat construction project: Work with consultant 

r 365 day sun angle cycle requirements for heliostat 

Make engineering drawings to present to skylight 

with all necessary components ror continuous automatic 

r heliostat. Review vendors for hardware requirements. 

with skylight contractor, fabrication and testing 

ror all phases of heliostat installation. Finalize 



I n v e 

engineer 

operation. 

contractor 

operation c 

Coord i na te 

procedures 



engineering drawings with skylight contractor 



Artist Fee: 



S5000. 



Coordinate actual fabrication and installation of heliostat at 
site with skylight contractor. Inspect all components and 
electrical hardware at site. Coordinate computer hardware, 
indexer technology with vendors and supervise at site 
installation. Calibrate, operate and test components with 
computer engineer. Provide maintenance and operating manual. 
Evaluate system with engineer. 

■ I s t Fee: i ■ 



ATRIUM PROGRAM ROOMS; 

Coordinate fabrication and install canopy covei in west atrium. 

Coordinate and inspect window glazing, doors, concrete planters, 

concrete seat, security net and cables with contractor in both 

atriums. Plan arid draw post construction mural and mural panel in 

utility space. Supervise installation and painting at site. 

Coordinate with Rehabilitation Program Direct g r am uses ror 

east and west atrium spaces. 



Artist Fe< 



49000. 



SOUTH WALL: 

Make on-site inspection with architects or contractor sample 
prototype. I n s p e c t visual effects. 



Artist Fee ; 



i L000. 






■ 





January 18. 1991 

Jill Manton 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

45 Hyde Street 

San Francisco, CA 

94102 

Dear Jill. 

Enclosed is a copy of the proposal that we will be submitting on 
March 30th to NEA. Visual Arts, requesting funds to support Will 
Nettleship's project. As I mentioned on the phone, he wants to 
create a orientation system that enables visually impaired people to 
find their way from a bus stop at Beach and Broderick to and 
throughout the museum. 

As I mentioned on the phone, NEA requires a site use statement 
from the proper city agency stating that we can locate one of 
Nettleship's tactile maps at the Bus Stop. We would be extremely 
grateful if we could obtain this statement from the Art Commission. 

Tom Karnes was Will's consultant on the planning of this project 
and a member of the Mayor's Office of Community Development, 
Section 504 Taskforce. He said that he would be glad to answer 
questions that you might have. His phone number is: 
(415) 431-0245 

We are very excited about this work and the potential that it has for 
making the museum more enjoyable and meaningful to a wider 
audience. 

Best regards. 




3601 Lyon Street 

San Francisco PR/er 

California 94123 

(415) 563-7337 



Peter Richards 
Director of Art Programs 



* 



OMB Wo 3135-0066 fjplres 3/31/93 



Visual Arts 
Program 
FY 1991 



I. Applicant Organization (name, address, zip) 
Exploratorium 
3601 Lyon Street 
San Francisco, CA 94123 

Phone: (415) 563-7337 



Organization Grant Application Form NEA-3 (Rev.) 

Application* mutt be submitted In triplicate and mailed to: information Managemenl 
Dlvrslon/VA (Category nam*), 8th floor, National Endowment for the Art*, Nancy Hank* 
Cantaf, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20506 



n. Category under whkh support 
Is requested: 

DVI»ual Arllst* Organization* 

3Vl»ual Arlls'la Forum* 
Art In Public Place* 
03 Special Project* 



HI. Par lod ol »upport requested: 
Starling July 1, 1991 



Or :iog 



month day yaar 
June 30, 1992 
month day yaar 



IV. Employar I.D. Numbar 

94-196-6494 



V. Summary ol project description (please raad "Special Application Requirements", for your catagory bafor* completing lljls section) 

The Exploratorium requests $25,080 to commission sculptor Will Nettleship to 
create and install a series of sculptures that will function as a landmark orientation system 
? r ™' ors Wlth visual impairments. The work will consist of a series of tactile maps, 
linked by textured pathways and offering tactile and kinesthetic directions to the locations 
of Exploratorium exhibits and facilities. This work will be a unique collaboration between 
an institution and an artist, one that will be a solid model for one way that public art can 
provide a valuable service for special populations. Total project cost will be $50,160. 

In a two- week residency at the Exploratorium in October, 1990, Nettleship studied 
the floorplan of the exhibit space and worked with several disabled consultants to conceive 
his design for the project At an initial meeting, a consultant who is blind arrived at the city 
bus stop a block from the Exploratorium immediately got lost, finding himself at last at the 
pond behind the Exploratorium on the grounds of Palace of Fine Arts. The incident 
confirmed Nettleship's concept of an orientation sculpture. 

Nettleship will cast these landmark maps in bronze, and will install eight of them, 
including one at the city bus stop outside the Exploratorium, a master map in the lobby, and 
six maps at 30 meter intervals on the exhibit floor. Scale on these low-relief maps will be 
exaggerated and features identified by various textured surfaces. The maps and pathways 
will provide clear and creative directions. Visually impaired visitors will find the first of 
these maps as they get off the bus outside the museum, and will thus be able to tour the 
Exploratorium independent of help from sighted people. (continued on attached pages) 



VI. Estimated number of person* expected to benefit from thl* project 



VB. Summary of estimated co»t* (recapitulation of budget Item* In Section DO, 

A. Direct cost* 

Salaries and wage* 

Fringe bene (ft* 

Supplies and materials 

Travel 

Permanent equipment 

Fees and other 



Total costs of project 
(rounded to nearest ten dollars) 





• 


5,720 


(i 182 




1.030 


12.150 


1.900 


21.000 





B. indirect costs 



@ 20% 



Total direct costs $ . 



Total project costs $ . 



50 : 160 



25,080 



Vni. Total amount requested from the Nation <l Endowment for the Art* $. 

NOTE: This amount (Amount requested): £ 5 > Q 8 Q 

PLUS Total contributions, grants, and revenues (XI, page 33): 
MUST EQUAL Total project costs (VTI, sbove): 



SO. 160 



IX. Organization total fiscal activity 



A. Expenses 

B. Revenues, grant*, and contribution* 



Actual for 
Fiscal year ending 

Mav DIM 

: T"6, 200, 000 y ~ 
,;; 5.800.00(3 



Estimated for 
Fiscal year ending 
Mav /IB 89 

month _ , _ _ _ _ _ 

if 7,600,000 

2.$ 



Piojectedfor 
Fiscal year ending 

"iv. no$Q 

»~ S 7 <h 7,700,000 Y ~ 
V. 7.700.000 



Project Director: 



Peter Richards 



Phone: 

(415)563-7337 



X. Budget breakdown of wmmry f aatbnatad coat* 
A. Dtract coil* 



1. Salarba and w 

TKU and/or typa 
of p«f»ono«l 



Numbarof 
par »o mat 



Annual or avarag* 
■•Wry rang* 



davotad lo Ihts 
projact 



Amount 

$ 



Machine Shop Tprh ] _ 



Technical Assistant 1 



3 4, 000 



11. 3Z 



= $l77hr x'175 hrs. 1 

, $24,00fl- ~ 6.25X 



Graphic Designer 1 



T =$lg/hr x 125 brs. 1 



Electrical Shop Tech 1 



^ 



/hr x 1 
34,000 



1 - $17/hr x 30 hrs. T 



TT3T 



$36", 000 
I - $!6/hr x 40 hrs. V 



2% 



3,000 



1,500 



~5W 



720 



Total aatartaa and wa 8 a« $ 5,720 
Add trlnga baoaftta $ ~~I ,030 



Total saforlas and wagas Including frlnga b*rr»fH» $ 6 . 750 



2. Suppllas and malar lab (fist aach major typa Mparafaty) 



Amount 

$ 



Floor Texture 


4,noo 


Pedestals 


1.500 


Paving 


5.400 


Misc. 


1,000 


Graphic Materials 


250 












Total auppfta* and mat ar lei 


$ 12,150 



Transportation of parsomal 

No. of travafara from to 


Amount 
$ 


1 Round Trip Kansas Citv San Francisco 


350 


1 Round Trip Kansas Citv San Francisco 


350 


























Total transportation of partonnal 


» 700 



Subslstartca 
No. of travalara 



60 



no 



I .200 



Total aubafatanca t 1 ,?00~ 
Total travat (a ♦ b) $ 1 ,90 



T mmmm 








X. B«l«»lbr^«,w n oi,umm»fyol».amrt«<»e < >^.(eon«lrxi*l) 

4. Permanent ^.pment Amoyn( 

* 


3 














' 






Tola! permanent eejulpment $ 




5. Fee* for services and other expense* (Thrt each Hem separately) 

ni ~ ' Amount 
Direct payment to artists (exclusive of costs for travel, subsistence: supplies and materials) $ 






Honorarium 


r.ooo 


■ 














Total direct payment* to art 1st i 
Other fee* and expenses 


$ 8,000 




9 




Contingency 


1.000 






Contracted Services: 




Bronze Casting 


12.000 




























Total other fees and expenses 


$ 13,000 


Total direct payment to artist* and othar fees and expenses 


$ 21,000 






B. Indlract coats Amount 

Rata established by attached negotiation agreement wtlh 
National Endowment for tha Aria or anothar Federal agency 

Rata 20 % Basel 41,800 $ 8.360 
Note: Rate reauested less than neeotiated rate. 


XL Contribution*, grants and revenue* (for this project) 

A. Contribution* Amount 

1. Cash $ 

2. kvfclrvd contributions (fist each major Ram) $ 




























Total contribution* 
ants (do not list anticipated grant from the Arts Endowment) 


• 


B. Q 


* 




LEF Foundation: $5,000 (received'); Tamarack Foundation: 




$5,000: T.B. Walker Foundation: $5,000; Rockefeller 




Foundation: $5,080: California Arts Council: $5,000. 






Total grants 
•venues 


$ 25,080 


C. R 


$ 






















Total revenues 
Total contfbutlone, grants, and revenues for this project 


• 




* " ,08 ° ' 



THE EXPLOR ATORlUM_p 

~~3601 LYONSTREET~~ 
3 SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94123 
(415)563-7337 




V. Summary of Project, continued 

Housed within a large, curving structure, the Exploratorium's structural 
eccentricities require all visitors to navigate along curved lines, a task difficult for any one, 
particularly the visually impaired. Many of the Exploratorium's exhibits, including those 
on tactile and aural perception, are of particular interest to visitors with visual impairments. 
Nettleship's sculptures will provide straight paths to adjacent map stations, then direct the 
visitor to nearby exhibits and facilities. 

This project is a natural outcome of the Exploratorium's mission and current 
programs. The museum's central theme is human perception, as reflected in both science 
and art Its interactive exhibits demonstrate the ways in which basic natural phenomena 
behave and are perceived; that is, the museum explores both what may be known and how 
one knows it. Frank Oppenheimer founded the Exploratorium in 1969, "to make it 
possible" he said, "for people to believe that they can understand the world around them" 
In instituting this theme, the Exploratorium has since sought ever-wider audiences for its 
exhibits. Nettleship's sculptures are the latest expression of this endeavor at 
empowerment. 

More immediately, Nettleship's landmark maps arise from two current programs at 
the Exploratorium. Our Artist-in-Residence Program has since 1974 brought four to six 
artists per year to produce works that are permanently installed on the floor. Residency 
projects often dovetail with our ongoing programmatic interests. This year the main thrust 
of our exhibit development program has been the planning of a major exhibition, entitled 
Navigation: A Technological and Cultural Look at Finding One's Way. Planned to 
conincide with the 1992 Quincentenary Celebration, this exhibition takes as its starting 
point people's personal experiences of navigation, and examines process of navigation 



Nettleship Installation Project Summary. 2 

from a technical, cultural, and historical perspective. We are developing a wide array of 
exhibits and presentations on the subject, including, for example, the oceanic navigation 
methods of Micronesia, for instance, and the land navigation techniques of Eskimo 
peoples. We plan to commission a number of artworks to be included, and our discussions 
with Nettleship arose in this context Nettleships installation will be an integral part of this 
Navigation exhibit, and will be as well a further component of our exhibits on the tactile 
senses. It will provide important insights to all visitors on how people use available senses 
to move through space. 

Nettleship has founded his career as a public sculptor on collaborations with the 
communities in which his work is placed (see attached article). His long-term interest in 
issues of accessibility and his collaborations with communities of the physically impaired 
made him a particularly apt choice for this project, as did his previous work in serial 
sculpture and in the walkway as sculpture. Since 1978 he has completed 132 public 
commissions, exhibited in commercial and public galleries, and worked with design teams. 
He received his B.A. from Columbia University (1967) and his MFA from the University 
of Arkansas (1972). He has created sculptural walkways and entrances for the visually 
impaired at several sites, among them the Children's Museum of Kansas City and the 
Kansas School for the Visually Handicapped. 

Nettleship will be paid an honorarium of $8,000 for the period he works on this 
project at the Exploratorium; he will further receive a travel and subsistence allowance 
totalling $1900. The Exploratorium will also provide a materials budget and technical 
assistance. Matching funds for this grant will be provided by existing grants to our Artist- 
in-Residence Program, including a $5,000 giant for the Nettleship sculptures from the LEF 
Foundation (see Item XI. B). I-ast year the Exploratorium had 600,000 visitors; including 
many groups of physically impaired people (one group dealing with learning disabled kids 
used the exhibits to sensitive parents to their children's condition). We believe that all 
600,000 visitors would have benefitted from Will Nettleship's installation. 



OMB No. 3115-0066 Expires 3/31*3 



Visual Artists Organizations Supplementary Information Sheet 

ONLY Applicants under the Visual Artists Organizations category should complete this form and return it in duplicate wtth their application. 
Lmrt your responses to the space provided on the sheet. Do not use additooal pages. 
Name of applicant: Exploratorlum 

1. Briefly descnbe the history of your organization, including its scope of activities and experience in conducting programs similar to 
those for which funds are being requested. i 

' - i 

i a J v o "S" st 1969 > Dr- Fran * Oppenheimer founded the Exploratorium in the 
landmark Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco. He saw the Exploratorium as a new kind 
or museum, a laboratory of both science and art demonstrated through hands-on, 
interactive exhibits. By 1970, Exploratorium scientists, artists and educators had created a 
unique exhibit collection and had begun to institute interpretive and outreach programs. 
K>ur years later, the core programs of the Exploratorium were in place-among them, the 
AiHsts-in-Residence program out of which this project with Will Nettleship arose. Today 
the hxploratonum is a collage of 650 interactive exhibits in science, art, and human 
perception. 



Describe your organization's structure and list board members, advisory panelists, and staff. Indicating their professions or areas 
of expertise. For artists, specify discipline. For all board members specify committee assignments, If applicable. Please limit yen 
response to the space below. 



The Exploratorium has a staff of 1 15 full time and 95 part time employees, 
including 45 teenaged "Explainers," our informal docents. While the museum is arranged 
according to departments, this structure is relatively loose, allowing people to work in 
many areas, according to their interests and talents. The museum is governed by a 40- 
member board (see attached list), whose composition reflects the Exploratorium's 
educational mission, as well as its role as a major cultural presence in San Francisco. 
Decisions on long-range planning and fiscal responsibility are overseen by a joint board- 
staff committee. Decisions on programming content are reviewed by the Arts Advisory 
Board (see attached list), in consultation with the staff and the Artistic Director. 



(Continued on reverse) 



36 Visual Artists Organizations Supplementary Information Sheet (continued) 

3. Describe hew visual artists have an Integral rote in policy development and programming. 

The Exploratorium involves artists in all aspects of museum programming. Artists 
are employed in every area of the museum: as program curators and administrators, as 
teachers, as exhibit designers and technicians. The Artist-in-Residence Program is 
coordinated by artist Peter Richards, under the guidance of an advisory panel of prominent 
people in the Bay Area arts community. Once an artist is selected for the Exploratorium's 
residency program, she or he consults with staff members and has access to all museum 
technical facilities. 

4. Describe how visual artists are selected for your programs. Also describe membership policy, if applicable. 

The Exploratorium receives inquiries about its Artist-in-Residence program from all 
over the country and from other countries as well. As most of these inquiries come from 
the major US art centers, Program Director Peter Richards initiates contact with artists 
outside of these localities whenever possible. The Exploratorium seeks out artists who like 
to experiment and who are interested in the kinds of natural phenomena that make up the 
thematic content of the museum. Artists selected by a staff committee are reviewed by the 
Advisory Panel for ratification. 



Describe your policies for payment of fees to visual artists who provide their work or services to your programs. Bo sure to indicate 
whether fees are paid in all cases or just for certain programs. Also describe your sales or commission policy, if applicable. 



Fees to artists are negotiated based on the time and scope of the project, and fees are 
paid to artists in all cases. 



Describe the size and composition of the constituency served by your organization, the methods used to inform the public of you 
programs, and your organization's relationship to other arts organizations in the area. 



The Exploratorium's annual attendance is 600,000. 90% of the nation's science 
museums have borrowed from the Exploratorium's exhibits, and 70% of the science 
museums worldwide. The Exploratorium' s impact through such dissemination reaches 
50 to 60 million people per year. In the San Francisco Bay Area, The Fxploratoiium has 
especially close ties with area arts groups, particularly at the Headlands Center for Arts, 
Capp Street Project, New I^ngton Arts, and the Museum of Modern Art 



ML FV*I Report* 

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» y«, provld. .xpbn.tory Wormatlonon ■ »«pafa to .hi*" " 



X(V. Crtiflcatlon 



Th. Authofbtng Offlcfel(») c.rtlty INK th. Information cont.fr,*j In Ihb application. Including .H .tt.cnm.nL and .upporllng 
HHTuI^' ^ . C<Hr * Cl te ,h * b ** t °' °*» rwwbdg.. Th. Authorizing OtftcbK» ••»« «♦*»> that th. applicant will comply 

with th. F.d.r.1 r.ojilr.m.nU .p^Ktod un<tor A«u«. of CompttoncV on pag^ 24 2S. 

Authoring OfifcfaKt) 

«!^"J*V. fc , X ; Data.lonad January IS. 1991 

Ham. (print or typ.) Robert S P m pP r 

TRb (print or typ.) Actin g Director 

T.bphon. (arc coo>) (415) 563-7337 

Signature X D «t. tl8r> »d 

Nam. (print or typ.) v 

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T»bphon« (vm cod.) " 



Protect dr^tof /") /) 



Stgnatur. X 1/- Ul (A 6 O M# .ign^ January 15, 1991 

Nam.(prhtortyp.) Peter Richards 

TRI. (print or typ.) Proj e ct Director 

T»f.phon» (mm cod.) (415) 563-7337' 

•P»y»» (t° whom grant paymniU will b. Mnt ft* ofhw than authorizing official) 

Slgnatur. X Deto slgnad 

Ham* (print or typ.) 

TRI. (print or typ.) 

T«fcprK>n.(«f*acod.) 



*W payrrwol I. to b. mad. to anyon. othsc than th. grant.., R la urxtorrtood that th. grants b financially, admrtbtratrv.fy, 
programmatlcaffy r«*pon*lbb for all a*p*ct» of tha giant and that al raporta muat b. aubmKt.<) through th. granto*. 



BE SURE TO DOUBLE CHECK THE THE "HOW TO APPLY" SECTION OH PAOE 2« AND THE "SPECIAL APPLICATION 
REQUIREMENTS" FOR YOUR CATEGORY FOR ALL MATERIALS TO BE WCLUDED M YOUR APPLICATION PACKAGE 

LATE APPLICATIONS OR APPLICATIONS INCOMPLETE WHEN THE PANEL MEETS WILL BE REJECTED. 



Privacy Act 

Th. Privacy Act of 1974 r«julra. u. to fumbh you with th. foriowtng kiformatlon: 

Th. Endowm.nl b authoru»d to aoltcR th. nxjuattad ^formation by Section 8 of th. National 
Foundation on th. Art. and tha HumanRb* Act of 19*5, as arrm>dwl Th. Information b u>ad foe 
grant procwartg, »UtbHcal r^^rch, anaryab of tranob, and for congr. .atonal ©varalgM h*arlng«. 
FalTura to provtd. th. t»quwt.d Information could twult In ratoetton of your application. 



4529 Eighteenth Street 
San Francisco, CA 94114 

August 25, 1990 

Peter Richards 

Expl orator i um 

3601 Lyon Street 

San Francisco, CA 94123 

Dear Mr. Richards, 

Below is a resume of my public service activities and 
employment in art related activities. 



1974 
1974 
1979 

1986 
1987 
1986 
1984 

1989 
1989 
1990 



1990 Director, Secretary, Eureka Valley Promotion 

Assoc i at i on . 
1976 Neighborhood Festivals Resource Pool 

Coordinator, San Francisco Twin Bicentennials. 

1988 Licensed San Francisco Street Artist, woodcraft 
and wirecraft, puzzles games and musical 

i nstrumen ts . 
current Member SF DPW Newsrack Committee, following 
11 years promoting newsrack placement ordinance. 

1989 Member, SF DPW Accessibility Advisory Task 
Force . 

current Director, Editor, BayTalk Computer Users 

Group (for the visually and physically impaired) 
current Producer, recorded versions of Mensa 

Bulletin (national) and Mensa Intelligencer 

(regi onal ) . 
current Member SF Mayor's Council on Disability 

Concerns, 
current Member SF Mayor's Office of Community 

Development Section 504 Task Force, 
current Chairman, Committee on Access and 

Transportation, California Council of the Blind. 



I am currently working as an editor. I graduated from San 
Francisco State University in 1968 with a BA i n mathematics, 
I am a musician interested in computerized composition and 
performance. I won second prize in the crafts division in 
the Northern California Disability Fair Arts and Craft 
Compe t i t i on . 



TV- 



"Vf&Jh/ 1 "* 4 ' 



Tom Karnes 



Public Sculpture as a Collaboration 
with a Community 



Will Nettles/up 



Transforming inert materials into art, the modern sculptor, 
beginning iirith Rodin, enacts rather than depicts values. 

—Albert Elsen, Rodin s Thinker and the Dilemmas of 
Modern Public Sculpture 

One of (he most striking features of twentielh-cenlur, West- 
ern art is the revitalizalion of sculpture. From a high point 
in the Renaissance, the discipline of sculpture in Europe 
had gradually become a more and more literarv art. During 
the last 100 years, however, Western sculpture has once 
again reclaimed its roots as an art that best expresses its ideas 
through form and not through literary images. Much of the 
general public, however, continues to expect sculpture to 
be primarily a pictorial art that often uses the traditional 
figurative idiom. We still lack a language of public sculpture 
that is widely accepted outside the art world. 

The work of Auguste Rodin spans the period of transition 
to contemporary sculpture. When Rodin based a sculpture 
closely on a literary metaphor, for example in The Eternal 
Idol, he made sculpture that seems insipid to us now; but 
when he gave free play to his kinesthetic imagination, he 
made sculpture that remains powerful. He was interested in 
lightness and heaviness, simple yet vital ideas in sculpture. 
His figure Adeleh a free-floating, lithe female nude, express- 
ing freedom and ease. In contrast, his figure Earth t>8 is a 
male nude partly embedded in the soil and struggling to lift 
up his own overwhelming weight; the form of the sculpture 
expresses bondage and frustration Rodin was recognized as 
a great sculptor in his own time, but even he experienced 
frequent rejection when he proposed public monuments. 
One well-known case is his monument to Balzac. Rodin's 
figure of the novelist is a paunchy middle-aged man who 
nevertheless emerges as virile and powerful. Rodin per- 
formed this feat of transformation by the boldness of his 
forms and the directness of the work's kinesthetic appeal 
due to the figure's vigorous stance. This sculpture works 
through the means of sculpture rather than by referent e to 
verbal ideas. Strong as the Batzacis, the I ommittl e oversee- 
ing the project rejected it. Sculptors of our time continue 
to search for ways to make public sculpture that is both valid 
as sculpture and acceptable as a pan of public life ( I ]. 

ON SCULPTURE IN PUBLIC PLACES 

In the Middle Ages sculptors, aftei a period ol app 

ship, would establish a workshop where the) made* ulpture 

for clients, ecclesiastical, civic or domestic, and wh< re lhe> 



ABSTRACT 

Irom Rodin to the present, 
sculptors have had drfficulty finding 
a vocabulary lor public art that is 
not only valid as sculpture and true 
to the spirit of then times but also 
acceptable to the general public. 
An urban neighborhood associabon 
commissioned the author's first 
public sculpture, a set of boundary 
markers built as a political organiz- 
ing tool Over the course of building 
1 1 public sculptures, he has 
observed that putting the skills of a 
sculptor to work to meet the needs 
of a group of people who use a pub- 
lic space is a useful way to ap- 
proach public art The community's 
ideas can serve as found obtects'. 
sources for the sculpture. The 
author has been able lo explore in 
large-scale work some of the same 
ideas as those in his norwepre- 
sentabonal studio sculpture Sculp- 
ture made m the spirit of collabora- 
tion with a community is likely to be 
accepted by that community 



Will Neulethip (Kulplor), *607Wtn6Sn) Si ,Shiwn« Ml i, KSI 

Received 'J5 Oclober 19*7 



also made a variety of other ob- 
jects that required the skills of 
shaping but were not, strictly 
speaking, sculpture, such as 
furniture or the furnishings for 
a church. In that society, St ulp- 
lors had a place; they worked 
within a traditional form vocab- 
ulary and met the stated needs 
of their patrons. Such a system 
siill exists in rural India, for 
example, where many villages 
have a caste of sculptors whose 
primary duty is to make the 
processional figures and tem- 
ple tableaus for the annual re- 
ligious festivals. 

The sculptors of the Renais- 
sance also had patrons, but 
their horizons were broader 
than the traditional form vo- 
cabulary of the medieval world. Some of them made two 
bodies of work, public work for their patrons and private 
work for themselves. The private work was gcneralh more 
exploratory, problematical and unfinished than the public 
work. The best example is Michelangelo, who made manv 
highly finished figures for his patrons but also made the 'un- 
finished' figures that are now in the Academy in Florence. 
pariiallv abstract works that prefigure much of subsequent 
sculpture. He did not make these for clients. Rodin, too. 
made hundreds of sculptures as private studies, some of 
them fragmentary or erotic. Manv were not shown until 
decades after his death [2]. 

In our time, the patron/atelier system described above 
has disappeared, and sculptors work through two systems, 
neither of which, in ni\ view, em mirages sculptor* to work 

• in ii tl\ with i he public One svsiem comprises the commer- 
cial art galleries, which typicall) Mil works of art to private 

• ollei tors, Fur the mosi part, this an is domestii . ih.it is. ii 
is intended to go into the buyer's house oi office and israrelv 
made with a specifu publii place in mind In addition, 
galli ins thai sell conu mporarj art usual!) focus on what- 
evei movement is current in the art world 1 In- dialogue in 
the .hi ""il. I I. mis ;.. follow trends thai c.\n change radi- 
call) from decade todei ade Main ol these trends are based 

on the pin. He ruminations of .irusts, the kind ol '|ni\.uc' 

win k 1 lies, ribed in the work of Rodin above rhis I 
panded the frontiers ofart but done little to involve the gen- 
eral publii in the life of art Since an trends change so much, 
a his ' . en .iiiiii uli to si. in .i sustained dialogue with the 
publii n ordei to re-establish an appropriate lang 
publii hi I he second system comprises the university an 




departments, which are organized like 
other academic departments with du- 
ties divided between teaching and re- 
search, research in this case being 
understood as the making of art. The 
university provides shelter and sup- 
port for research that may be incom- 
prehensible to people who are not al- 
ready familiar with the particular field 
under study. If sculpture is seen as re- 
search, it is also seen as the province 
of specialists. In sum, in their ordinary 
course of business, neither the com- 
mercial galleries nor the universities 
involve sculptors with the public in an 
ongoing way. 

A recent development that does in- 
volve sculptors with the public is 'site- 
specific' work, sculpture made for a 
specific place. This idea is novel only 
against the background of our most 
recent past. Traditionally, sculptors 
worked in a social context and for a 
given place as a matter of course; 
equally as a matter of course, the 
needs of the patron became part of the 
process of making sculpture. Rather 
than site-specific', I propose the term 
community' for sculpture that is 
made for a given public place and 
takes account of the social needs of 
that place. This is a return to an earlier 
altitude rather than a new develop- 
ment. 

The process of including the think- 
ing of outsiders in making sculpture is 
difficult now because there is no com- 
mon sculptural vocabulary and no 
common understanding of the pur- 
pose of public sculpture as there was, 
for example, when the portal sculp- 
tures were made for the cathedral at 



F.g. I. Ifyde Park Seighborhood 
Marker, Kansas City, Missouri, cast 
concrete with cast aluminum 
attachments, 185 cm high, 1978. 
Eight markers were placed at 
various locations around the Hyde 
Park neighborhood; the example 
shown is one of a pair at 36lh and 
Cillham Road. The markers are a 
contemporary variation on a tura- 
of-lhe-century stone gateway at the 
center of the neighborhood. The 
neighborhood association commis- 
sioned the markers as part of a 
program of renovation. The 
markers are simpler and more 
sculptural than the original but 
still in keeping with the character 
of the area. 



Chartres. Those sculptures may be the 
ideal public art, for the sculptors were 
part of a coherent community and 
their development as artists paralleled 
a general spiritual development of the 
society around them. Obviously public 
sculpture in our lime cannot be the 
focus of a community in the intimate 
way it was in the Middle Ages. Never- 
theless, successful public sculpture re- 
quires that the sculptor understand 
the public context. Sculptors in this 
field must balance their private vision 
with an understanding of public need. 
Making public sculpture is not a field 
of theoretical study; it is an activity in 
which sculptors must deal face to face 
with people outside the art world. In 
my view, a successful public sculpture 
is a monument, that is, the outward ex- 
pression of the inward idea of a com- 
munity. It is not so much 'site-specific' 
as 'culturally specific': an expression 
of a community as well as of an artist. 

COMMUNITY 
SCULPTURE: 
NEIGHBORHOOD 
MARKERS 

In the early 1970s, I set up a studio in 
an inner-cirv area of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri. At the lime I was working as a 
blacksmith, and I made wrought-steel 
sculpture and oiher items in my work- 
shop. Since I owned a house and a 
small business there, I took an interest 
in my neighborhood, and I found 
myself working with my neighbors 
(through a neighborhood associa- 
tion) and with citv officials to secure 



services and renovation funds for an 
area that had been neglected in recent 
Limes. After I had worked with the 
other residents for a few years, they 
turned to me for help in designing 
some boundary markers for the neigh- 
borhood. Boundary markers are a way 
of creating pride in an area, and they 
were on the association's list of proj- 
ects to restore the neighborhood. 

The design process and the paper- 
work for these markers took over two 
years. During that time I developed a 
number of proposals and then refined 
one, which was a variation on some 
turn-of-the-century pillars already in 
the area (Fig. 1). What I was looking 
for, and what the residents wanted, 
was something that would fit the 
character of a once-grand area, which 
had been the most elegant part of the 
city between 1900 and 1910. At the 
same time, I was looking for some- 
thing that would be valid as sculpture 
and would reflect the development of 
art in our time. 

Since then I have built a second set 
of markers, this one for an area built 
in the 1920s. The design for these 
consists of two colors of brick with con- 
crete insets, echoing the Art Deco 
design in some neighborhood struc- 
tures. As the design evolved, a com- 
mittee and I worked together on such 
matters as materials, scale, location 
and signs. I have come to believe, be- 
cause of the experiences I have had 
with neighborhood groups, that pub- 
lic sculpture can have a social use. By 
this, I do not mean that a public sculp- 
ture must have a utilitarian role — it 
has foremost an aesthetic function — 
but for people who live with it, it may 
have other functions as well. For ex- 
ample, a sculpture may be a boundary 
landmark or may create a place for 
people to rest. 

COMMUNITY 
SCULPTURE: PUBLIC 
GATHERING PLACES 

Meanwhile in my studio work I started 
working with sculpture based on land- 
scape forms that I modeled and cast. 
These sculptures are not representa- 
tions of land forms as such, but they 
start from landscapes and geological 
ideas. The sculptures form a develop- 
ing set based on variations of a theme. 
Through them I have explored certain 
issues in sculpture, especially how to 
create internal energy, how to make 



Setllnhip. Public S< itlpct 



surfaces that reflect interna! structure 
and how 10 make edges on forms like 
landscapes that have no natural edges. 
The sculptures are small; each fits 
inside a cube whose sides measure 
50 cm. The set now numbers over 290 
(Fig. 2). 

I began to think about ways to bring 
these two lines of thought together: 
my ongoing studio work and my work 
with the neighborhood markers. The 
markers are only the visible evidence 
of a process, the last step in develop- 
ing a consensus about the need for 
markers, their location, their funding, 
their role in the overall renovation of 
an area. The sculptor is necessarily an 
outsider to much of this, but for it to 
work, he or she must participate. 
Making a public sculpture through 
neighborhood action has two impor- 
tant advantages: first, the sculpture is 
from the outset accepted as part of a 
neighborhood, and, second, the 
neighborhood people often contrib- 
ute good ideas, specifically sculptural 
ideas. These ideas can be 'found ob- 
jects' or even Dadaesque 'accidents' 
for the sculptor. 

The same neighborhood group 
that worked with me on the second set 
of markers wanted a fountain. They 
had a specific set of requirements for 
it: a water feature with very low main- 
tenance needs, a work that would not 
depend on the water for its effect 
(since water could not be used in the 
winter), a place where people could sit 
and that would be safe for small child- 
ren. What came out of a process of 
development and refinement over a 3- 
year period was a pedestrian-scale 
plaza area set back from a busy street 
and screened by a grove of trees 
(Fig. 3). The sculpture is shaped con- 
crete with brick trim. There is a brick 
basin with a spray water feature that 
runs over zig-zag bricks and makes a 
brooklike noise in the drain system 
The shapes of the sculpture are large- 
scale realizations of the forms of my 
studio work, but their scale and layout 
are such that the forms of the sculp- 
ture also make a place for people to 
walk and sit and watch and listen to the 
water feature. Walking across the 
sculpture is literally a kinesthetic ex- 
perience for people who visit it The 
sculpture itself is actuall) an out- 
growth of the neighborhood political 
life, the result of meetings among 
neighbors and with city offil ials. 

Two years later the nciglihoihi.od 
residents decided that they needed 
more seating at the site. Aftei trying 



Fig. 2. Sumber 203. 50-cm 
series, cast gypsum cement 
with cement color, 9 • 47 x 
47 cm, 1985. This studio 
work is one of a series of 
small sculptures that fit 
within a 50-cm cube. The 
series explores ideas of 
internal energy and the 
relationship between inter- 
nal and external form. The 
forms develop from one 
sculpture to the next in the 
manner of a theme and 
variation. 




4$ 




Fig. 3. Lydia Street Fountain, I.ydia Avenue and 58th Street, Kansas Gtv, Missouri; 
concrete and paving brick; main unit, 32 m (105 ft) long-, 1983-85. This gathering place 
for the 49/63 Neighborhood Association consists of a water feature, a main unit and 
three outlying resting areas. The sculpture was commissioned by a neighborhood associa- 
tion as part of a renovation plan for the area. The association specified a low-mainte- 
nance water feature (the one here uses small amounts of water falling into an 
underground chamber to make a brooklike sound )■ The members also wanted a place to 
rest and for the whole to be on a walking scale suitable for parents and small children. 



out commercial benches, they raised 
the money for me to design and build 
other units to the sculpture that would 
provide places for people to sit undei 
the trees. I extended the same mea- 
sutcments, angles and lines of sight 
and cardinal orientation from the cen- 
tral unit into the surrounding units mi 
thai the whole space would become a 
wort of art. In summary, the neighbor- 
hood fountain became an ongoing 
focusofpolitii.il .11 tixitx in I lie neigh- 
borhood when ii w.is designed, built 
and expanded. It is now ,i CCntCI "I 

communis life. 

Wliile 1 was developing the neigh- 
borhood fountain in Kansas tits. .1 
town in eastern Kansas commissioned 
me t<> build a mi mortal fountain in 
the town pat k \i iins time I met 1 
( urn rete 1 rafutpcrson nam< d Leon 
1 11 king 1 le Mid I have sun 1 wot ked 



together on outdoor pieces and de- 
veloped a wa\ of making large-scale 
sculpture with concrete (see Appen- 
dix below). For the town park, I 
consulted with a committee of local 
people, and we built a plaza area with 

at 1 ess sui. u.iiks. plan es to mi. .1 plant- 
ing area and a watei pool all as parts 
of a sculpture. Other commissions 
have included .1 playground for a pre- 
school, foi which m\ duel (■ 1111.111 
group was the sufi ol the si hool, and 
an overtook foi .1 college campus, for 
which my contact group was interested 
sin. 1 ., nis who participated in the de- 
sign ,md construction ol the si ulpture. 
\ni.thet project was .1 walkway and 
sports memorial foi .1 high school, 

whrie .ig.nn .1 group ol students 

helped in the design and construc- 
tion 

lii the 1.1II ,.i 1986 I .-..ii 1 ickteig 






173 




and I built a sculpture in Maribor, an 
industrial city in northern Yugoslavia. 
The sculpture is in the busy inner part 
of the city, in front of the city art 
museum and adjacent to the outdoor 
market. It is an area with a great deal 
of pedestrian traffic and a place where 
people congregate. Working through 
an interpreter, I talked to as many 
people as I could about this place, and, 
taking their suggestions into account, 
I designed a sculpture that is a walkway 
(Fig. 4) and a place for people to sit in 
the shade of a giant linden tree 
(Fig. 5). Part of the sculpture consists 
of four areas of small stone paving 
blocks, each 10 cm on an edge. In this 
part of the sculpture we left spaces for 
a group of local craftspeople to lay the 
blocks in patterns of their own choos- 
ing, for the city of Maribor has manv 
different styles of paving stone pat- 
terns and I wanted tiie sculpture to re- 
flect that tradition. After its first sum- 
mer of use, a correspondent of mine 
in Maribor wrote that the sculpture 
had become a warm-weather gather- 
ing place; she has named it Polelno 
Vaelje (The Summer Pleasure). 



Fig. 4. Polebw Vaelje 
(The Summer Plea- 
sure), Maribor, Yugo- 
slavia; concrete and 
paving stones; main 
unit, 39 m (130 ft) long; 
1986. (Photo: Zmago 
Jeraj) The sculpture is 
in an old area of the city 
where many people 
walk by. The shaped 
paving material in the 
sculpture provides an in- 
teresting passage across 
the lawn area and a rest- 
ing place in the shade 
of the large linden tree. 

Fig. 5. Poletno Veselje, 
Maribor, Yugoslavia. 
(Photo: Zmago Jeraj) 
Detail of resting area 
under the linden tree. 
The section of paving 
stones laid in a semi- 
circular pattern be- 
tween the concrete 
flatwork was added by a 
crew of craftspeople 
from Maribor. 



Summary 

An that is successful in public settings 
expresses the values of a community. 
We need contemporary art to express 
the values of our contemporary com- 
munities. The old figurative vocabu- 
lary of sculpture has degenerated into 
an outdated exercise, a form of craft, 
of bronze taxidermy. Such figurative 
sculptures no longer reveal our lives. 
A sculptor's public art should reflect 
the ferment of our time no less than 
does his or her studio work. Public 
sculpture, like all sculpture, is the 
product of the imagination of a sculp- 
tor. But sculpture in public settings 
also must take account of the commu- 
nity around it, its social uses, its 
history, and its symbols. Working with 
a community gives the sculptor a 
starting point and a framework and is 
away to make a private vision into pub- 
lic art. 

Appendix 

Leon Lickicig, a concrete craftsperson, and I have 
worked together on nine large projects. We h3\e 
worked out a procedure for shaping the concrete 
and pulling the desired finish on it. The first step 
ting sod and whatever soil is un- 



consolidated and then to dig a trench 20 1 m wide 
and 20 cm deep around the perimeter, as well as 
frost-footing uenches 20 cm wide and 80 to 100 
cm deep under the places where the sculpture will 
be high. We build perimeter flarwork forms with 
1 x 4 lumber. Then we make a pour of five-sack 
mix concrete in the frost footings and set rebar in 
it Next we create the overall form of the sculp- 
ture and solve whatever drainage problems exist 
with a layer of gravel over the soil. Then we place ^ 
rebar in a grid pattern over the whole surface; the (9 
bar is set 60 cm apart or closer Tor No. 4 ( 13-mm) -ssf 

rrbar Finall) we make theconcrcte shapes, a min- 
imum of 10 cm thick, with a low-slump, six-sack 
mix of concrete, consolidating the surface with a 
darbv and bull float and finishing with magne- 
sium floats, edgers and groovers and a fine broom 
to provide a smooth surface with a non-slip finish. 

References and Notes 

1. Ruth Butler. Ralm in Pmprrtwe (Englewood 
ClifTs. NJ Ptenuce-Hall. 1980) pp. 91-99. 

2. Leo Steinberg. Other Cnlena (New York: Ox- 
ford L'niversirv Press. 1975) pp 322-325. 

Glossary 

bull float — a hand tool, a large rectangular piece 
of magnesium or wood with a flat bottom attached 
to a long handle, used to produce a uniform pre- 
liminary surface on concrete fiarwork during the 
finishing process. 

darby — a hand tool, usually wooden, about 1 m 
long and 10 cm wide with a long, narrow flat 
working face, used in concrete finishing to create 
shapes in fresh concrete. 

edger — a hand tool, usually bronze, with a flat 
face and fin on one side of the working surface, 
used to make a unifoim small radius in the edge 
of concrete during the finishing process. 

groover — a hand tool, usually bronze, with two 
flat faces separated by a fin on the working sur- 
face, used to make a groove with uniform radii on 
each side in the middle of large panels of concrete 
during the finishing process. 

five- and six-sack mix — the amount of cement per 
yard of concrete as ordered from a concrete batch ^1 
plant. Since a sack of cement isaboul 100 pounds, 
a fise-sack mix contains approximately 500 
pounds of cement per cubic yard. Concrete 
strength is determined by many factors, one of 
which is the amount of cement in the mix; with 
practice, a fise-sack mix will produce concrete 
with a compressive test suenglh of 3000 pounds 
per square inch, and a six-sack mix will produce 
concrete with a 4000 pound lesl. 

frost footing — a pari of a concrete structure set 
within the ground below the frost line to keep the 
structure from heaving out of the ground in a 
severe frost (if the frost can completely envelop 
the structure from below, the sculpture will lift out 
of the ground). 

low slump — slump is a measure of the water con- 
tent of concrete while it is in a fluid state The 
drier a batch of concrete is, the stifTer it is. and it 
is said to have a 'low slump', i.e. it resists flattcn- 



magnesium float — a hand tool, a Hat. rectangular 
piece of magnesium measuring approximately 40 
x 9 cm. used with a rocking motion to produce a 
hard fine finish on concrete. 

rebar — steel bar, round in cross section with 
ndges along the bar. used as reinforcing within 
concrete togive the final product tensile strength. 
In the U.S.. rebar is described with a number 
which is the diameter of the rod in eighths of an 
inch, example: No. 4 is 4/8 or 1/2 in in diameter 



\rlllr\h,p. Puhlic Sculpti 



Will Nettleship 913-236-5 



200 



ARTS 



The Kansas City Star 



Sunday, November 5, 1989 



Sculptural walkway 
meant to be touched 



By Donald Hoffmann 

The Star's art and architecture critic 

How does art become truly pub- 
lic? By being outdoors, serving 
people's needs and, finally, 
appealing to the sense of touch as 
well as to the eyes. 

That's the hope of Will Nettleship, a 
Kansas City artist who designed a 
new sculptural walkway between the 
entrance of the Children's Museum of 
Kansas City and two entrances to the 
Kansas School for the Visually Handi- 
capped. 

More than 140 feet long, irregular 
in plan, careful in slope and complex 



in pattern, the reinforced-concrete 
walkway is to be dedicated in a 
program starting at 5:30 p.m. Satur- 
day in the school auditorium, 1100 
State Ave., Kansas City, Kan. 

"Maybe, this is a piece of sculpture 
that you experience in a serial way," 
Nettleship said a few days ago. "You 
could also think of it as being an 
extended sculpture garden." 

Trained as a sculptor, Nettleship is 
not enchanted by the prospect of 
making art for sale through commer- 
cial galleries to private collectors 
who put it in their homes. 

See Walkway, pg. 5 J, col. 1 




' Preschoolers (from left) Nicole Kameric. 3, Nicbole Boatright, 4, and 
Jeremy Spears, 3, experience the new sculpted walkway tn Kansas City, 
Kan. (staff photo by Jean Shifrin) 



please 
see over 



Will Nettleship 



Walkway 



continued from pg. 1J 



He likes art that escapes what 
he calls "the confines of an art- 
world that seems so sell-referen- 
tial." So far, he has engaged his 
sculptural imagination in a dozen 
community or public projects. 

"I've been interested in sculp- 
ture that would meet the needs 
people have," he said. "I want to 
be involved with things that peo- 
ple really use in their daily lives. 
Public work somehow has to be a 
collaTwration with the communi- 
ty." 

The new walkway is meant to 
serve the sighted as well as the 
visually handicapped and per- 
sons who use wheelchairs. It ex- 
tends mostly from east to west, 
between the Children's 
Museum— in a remodeled car- 
riagehouse and stable on the 
school property— and the south 
entrance to one of the school 
buildings. A spur reaches north 
to serve a secondary east en- 
trance to the school. 

Although the walk is strictly 
level in its lateral dimension, to 
facibtate the use of wheelchairs, 
it twists and turns much like a 
small creekbed. Moreover, it is 
banked with frequent wall-forms 
that channel its course and func- 
tion simultaneously as points of 
orientation and sitting-places, 
some shaded but most in the 
warming sun. 

The elevation of one door to 
the school is a full floor— about 
10 feet— above that of the other 
door, but the walk is calculated 
to maintain the slope of 1 foot in 
12 that's recommended for hand- 
icapped access. 

By working closely with blind 
people, Nettleship discovered not 
only that they paid particular 
attention to the juncture between 
vertical and horizontal planes for 
clues to orientation, but also that 
they appreciated the awareness 
generated by difficult or chal- 
lenging pathways. 

Much of the interest in the new 
walkway derives from its chang- 
es of course, changes in concrete 



texture and changes in the 
curved and clean-edged surfaces. 

Its hints or symbolic expres- 
sions of large-scale land masses 
are apparent, just as its insistent 
geometric patterning is intended 
to suggest a definite natural 
structure underlying the sur- 
rounding grassy soil. 

Nettleship acknowledges that 
the project, made possible by 
state funding, cuts through such 
separate professional fields as 
architecture and landscape ar- 
chitecture as well as sculpture. 

"I really feel that the most 
interesting and dynamic places 
are on the margins of fields," he 
said. "It's maybe where they 
overlap that something impor- 
tant can happen. Growth is at the 
edges." 

Nettleship recently published 
an essay on "Public Sculpture as 
a Collaboration with a Communi- 
ty" in Leonardo, a British journal 
of art and science. 

"Much of the general public," 
he writes, "continues to expect 
sculpture to be primarily a picto- 
rial art ... We still lack a lan- 
guage of public sculpture that is 
widely accepted outside the art 
world. 

"Sculptors of our time contin- 
ue to search for ways to make 
public sculpture that is both valid 
as sculpture and acceptable as a 
part of public life." 



WILL NETTLESHIP 



^oCULPTOR 4607 W. 63rd • Shawnee Mission • KS 66209 • 913/236-5200 

Summary 

Will Nettleship has built public commissions, exhibited in commercial and public galleries, and 
worked on design teams. He received an A.B. from Columbia University (1967) and an M.F.A. from 
the University of Arkansas (1972); he has taught on the college level, held artist residencies, and 
lectured and written on sculpture and public art. 

Public Commissions 

AS SMART AS I AM Kansas City, Kansas 1 989 
A sculpture for the kinesthetic sense at Kansas State School for the Visually Handicapped; 
concrete with colored aggregate and bush-hammered sections; 
43.5 meters by 28 meters (142 feet by 92 feet) 

PROGRESSION Kansas City, Missouri 1 988 
A symbol for the Middle School for the Arts; concrete, exposed aggregate; main unit: 32 meters 
long (105') plus four small units 

INCOMPLETE/ A STAGE Independence, Missouri 1988 
A gathering place for a reform school, McCune School; concrete, bush-hammered sections, 
12 meters long (39') 

IN WHITE BOOK GARDEN Los Angeles, California 1 988 
A meditation place in the residential complex at the University of Judaism; concrete and pebbles; 
7 meters long (23') 

URSA MAJOR Independence, Missouri 1987 
A sports symbol for high school, William Cristman High School: concrete and paving brick; 

19 meters long (62') 

THE SUMMER PLEASURE (Poletno Veselje) Maribor, Yugoslavia 1986 
A walkway and resting place near the city market and art museum; concrete and paving stones; 
main unit: 39 meters long (130') plus entryway unit: 3 x 4.25 x .8 meters (12' x 14' x 2.6') 

LYDIA STREET FOUNTAIN Kansas City, Missouri 1985 
A water feature and gathering place for an urban neighborhood, 49/63 Neighborhood 
Association; concrete and paving brick; main unit: 32 meters long (105'), plus three outlying units: 
4.5 meters (15'), 6 meters (20'), and 7.5 meters (25') long 

THE NEW SCHOOL PLA YGROUND Fayetteville, Arkansas 1 984 
A place to play for a preschool; concrete and earthwork; 55 meter long (180') 

LAKE OVERLOOK Fulton, Missouri 1983 
A meeting place and overlook on the William Woods College campus; concrete; 

20 meters long (65') 

(Please see over) 



page 2 

ALDEN WEBER MEMORIAL PLAZA (Pride Plaza) Osawatomie, Kansas 1 982 
A water feature and resting area for a town park; concrete; 38 meters across (125') 

49/63 NEIGHBORHOOD MARKERS Kansas City, Missouri 1982 
Three boundary markers for an urban neighborhood built in the 1920's; brick and cast concrete; 
9 feet high 

HYDE PARK NEIGHBORHOOD MARKERS Kansas City, Missouri 1 978 
Eight boundary markers for an urban neighborhood built in the 1900's; cast concrete and aluminum 
castings; 7 feet high 

Selected Exhibits 

Budapest Galeria, Budapest, Hungary, Proposals for a monument to 1956, 1989 
Santa Monica Arts Commission, Santa Monica (California) Airport, Proposals for 

Santa Monica Airport Administration Building, 1988 
Philadelphia Art Alliance, Artist/Architect collaborations: 

Proposals for Fairmount Park (with Brick Owens, ASLA), 1987 
Lever House, New York, Sculptors Guild Annual Exhibit, 1979 — 1986 
William Jewell College, Liberty, Missouri, 1986 solo 
Kansas City Artists Coalition, Kansas City, Missouri, 1985 solo 
Topeka Public Library, Topeka, Kansas 1984 solo 
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, 1984 solo 
Art Research Center, Kansas City, Missouri, 1983 solo 
Bedyk Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, Architects and Civic Projects, 1983 
New York Botanical Garden, Sculpture in the Garden, Sculptors Guild, 1981 
Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, Missouri, Art in Multiples, 1981 
Douglas Drake Gallery, Kansas City, Kansas, 1979 solo 
Douglas Drake Gallery, Kansas City, Kansas, with Hans Hoffman, 1976 

Residencies and Lectures 

Artist-in-residence grants from the Kansas Art Commission (1989) and from the Missouri Arts Council 
(two in 1988, 1987, 1983). Public lectures for the American Studies Program, Columbia University 
(1989), for the Landscape Architecture Program, University of Arkansas, also lead a design charette, 
(1987), and for the Illinois Arts Council, Decatur, Illinois (1987) 

Design Team 

Bales Lake, Blue Valley Park, Kansas City, Missouri Park System, 1988-89 

Artist member of a design team for the renovation of a lake with George Butler Associates, Kansas City 
and St. Louis, Engineers and Landscape Architects. Participated in all phases of shoreline redesign; 
individual responsibilities included neighborhood use study and concept drawings and architectural 
model of a fishing pier / spillway structure. Overall budget: $250,000. 



w 



City an. i 

■ 




'joss Avenue 

San Ffancbco. CA 94102 
(415) 554 9671 



2:00 I 



AGENDA FOR VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE MEETING 

Wednesday, March 27, 1991 

2 p.m. 

25 Van Ness, Suite 70 

Art Enrichment: Moscone Center 

Presenter: Tonia Macneil 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Aiey 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Krlken 
Robert F LoRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Balro. Ph D 
ilY Okamoto 
lie Rosekrans 



-j^ 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Ubrory Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMC Art Colectlon 
CMC Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Sheet Artists Licenses 



3:00 II. Minutes 

A. Approval of Feb. 20th minutes 

B. Staff recommendations regarding recording 
of the minutes. 

3:05 III. Consent Calendar 

A. Art Enrichment: 

1 . kezar Stadium 

a. Approve reimbursement to Alan 
Fleming of $775.43 for building 
permit for Kezar Stadium gates. 

b. Approve final payment of $3,500 
on fabrication contract 

c. Absolve Surety Co. of the 
Pacific of liability for 
$34,000 performance bond 
contingent on receipt and staff 
verification of proof of 
payment by contractor of all 
labor-, suppliers and 
subcontractors . 

2. Great Sea Wall Medallion 

Approve final payment of $2,000 to 
Gary Grahni for Great Sea Wall 
Medal 1 ion. 

3 . Li brary 

a. Authorize contract extension 
for Alice Aycock, Nayland 
Blake and Ann Hamilton through 
June 30, 1991 . 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415554-9682 



Authorize final payment on 1st 
design contract for Alice 
Aycock ($5,000) Lothar 
Bauingarten ( $8 ,000 ) ; 
Nayland Blake ($7,500) and Ann 
Harai 1 ton ( $7 , 500 ) . 




c 



Consent Calendar (continued) 

B. Gallery 

Approval of "Otras Caras" as working 
title for exhibit to coincide with 
C.A.R.A. exhibit at San Francisco Museum 
of Modern Art . 

3:10 IV. New Business 

A. Anthony Street Urban Garden 
Presenter: Jill Man ton 
Guests: George Gonzales and 
representatives from One Second St. Inc. 

B. Tenderloin Recreation Center 
Presenter: Jill Manton 
Visitors: Project architects, Bob 
Appelton and Bob Nist 

4:00 V. Program Reports 

A. Art Enrichment 

1 . San Andreas Water Treatment Plant 
Presenter: Tonia Macneil 
Visitors: Tim Collins and Reiko Goto 

2. Kezar Stadium 

Presenter: Susan Pontious 

4:30 3. Library 

Presenters: Jill Manton and Susan 

Pont ious 

Discussion of Phase II fees and 

contracts 

1 . Ai rport 

Presenter: Susan Pontious 

4:45 5. Market Street Master Plan 

Presenter: Jill Manton 

a. Discussion of coordination and 
printing costs. 

b. Mid-Market rezoneing and 
Percent- for-Art requirement 

4:55 6. Exploratorium 

Presenter: Jill Manton 

Proposal for Market St. film program 

5:05 7" Sunnydale Pump Station 

Presenter: Jill Manton 
Progress Report 



- 



5: 15 



Gallery 

Presenter: Susan Pontious 

1. Fiscal Agent update 

2 . Exhibitions 

3. Arts Edcation 

4. Exploration: City Site 
Proposals by Charles Gute , 
Preckler and Bernie Lubell 

5. Other i nf ormat ion 



Mie 



Staff Reports and Recommendations on Agenda Items 
1 • Moscone 

1 1 . Minutes 

A. Feb. 20th, 1991 Minutes 

B. Proposed changes in recording procedure for 

mi niil.es . 

Our present method of reporting the minutes, which 
consists of a detailed narrative of ail discussion 
items, is extremely time consuming, requiring 
nearly 2-3 full days of staff time to review notes 
and listen to the taped recording for 
verification. In contrast, other City Departments 
record only the dispensation of motions in their 
minutes. In this regard, the Art Commission far 
exceeds legal requirements for the recording of 
minutes . 

However, despite this careful attention, 
Commissioners have complained that remarks that 
they consider pertinent have not appeared in the 
written account. 

In many instances, there is no formal motion, but 
staff takes direction from what they understand 
the general committee consensus to be. However, 
it occasionally happens that after the meeting, a 
commissioner disagrees with staff's (and other 
commissioner's) interpretation as to what was the 
direction of the committee. This causes 
confusion and difficulty for everyone. 

Staff recommendation: Instead of attempting to 
record discussion items in a narrative fashion, at 
the end of a discussion each commissioner would 
summarize his/her response to the matter for the 
record . After hearing from each committee member, 
the Chair would then summarize, for the record, 
the majority opinion, or call for a formal motion 
if necessary. This majority opinion, or motion, 
will provide formal direction for further staff 
action . 

The virtue of this new approach would be that it 

1) should alleviate some of the time and 
difficulty involved in recording accurate minutes; 

2) would ensure each commissioner that their point 
of view is accurately represented in the official 
record and 

3) provide clearer direction for staff regarding 
committee policy 



III. Consent. Calendar 

Staff recommendation: adoption of consent calendar 

IV. New Business 

A. Anthony Street Urban Garden 

This is an art enrichment project sponsored by One 
Second Street Inc. The artist was selected by a 
panel made up of Jill Manton, John Caldwell, Renny 
Pritikin and Steven Oliver. 

Written proposal enclosed 

Staff recommendation: Approval of George Gonzales 
proposal for the Anthony St. Urban Garden. 

B. Tenderloin Recreation Center 
Presenter: Jill Manton 

Visitors: Project architects, Bob Appelton and 

Bob Nist 

Discussion of conceptual approach to project 



PROGRAM REPORTS: 

A. Art Enrichment 

1 . San Andreas Water Treatment Plant 

Interim presentation by Tim Collins and Reiko 
Goto 

2. Kezar Stadium 

Commissioner LaRocca and representatives from 
the Recreation and Park Dept . and DPW have 
made two visits to the fabricators to inspect 
the posts and gates. It was the consensus of 
all that the workmanship on the gates and 
posts is excellent and they appear to be very 
handsome. The artist has now completed the 
first contract. 

An issue of concern that has arisen is a 
proposed relocation of the stadium security 
fencing in response to a community group's 
demand for a pedestrian promenade. The 
redesign calls for moving the fencing back 
from the gates, so that it no longer attaches 
to the gates as originally designed, and for 
the gates to be open at all times. 

This plan was presented at the March 18th 
Civic Design Committee meeting. It was the 
strong feeling of the committee that this 
plan violated the higher order of design that 



the committee had approved previously, and 
that it violated the integrity of art gates. 

The Committee voted to support the original 
design and write a letter to the Recreation 
and Park Commission stating the committee's 
concerns. Members of the Visual Arts 
Committee were also polled for their support 
of Civic Design's position and a letter was 
sent to Mary Burns under the signature of 
both John Kriken and Anne Healy. 

Commissioner's LaRocca and Healy also planned 
to testify at the Recreation and Park 
Commission's March 21st meeting, where the 
commission was expected to make a decision 
regarding this proposed redesign. 

Staff recommendation: To continue strong 
opposition to any redesign plans that violate 
the context and integrity of the artwork. 

Li brary 

a. Phase I : 

Lothar Baumgarten, Nayland Blake, Ann 
Hamilton and Alice Aycock have completed 
the work contracted for the first design 
phase. Don Phemister is currently doing 
the cost estimates for implementation of 
these artist's proposals. While it had 
been hoped that we would have at least 
preliminary estimations for the costs 
involved in implementation for these 
projects, they are not yet complete. 

Alice Aycock has presented an estimated 
implementation budget of $286,000 for a 
single piece as presented at the Feb. 
20th meeting and $439,000 (less any 
architectural credits) if she is to 
design the entire garden area. Prices 
do not include travel expenses. 

Alice Aycock will be back in the country 
to work further with James Freed on her 
proposal the first of April. 

Staff Recommendations: Approve final 
payment on the first design contract for 
Baumgarten, Blake, and Hamilton and 
Aycock . 

Approve contract extensions for Blake, 
Hamilton and Aycock (current contracts 



expired in January, November and 
Oc t o be r , respectively) . 

Phase II; Design Development through 
working drawings. 

We are ready to enter into contracts 
with Baumgarten and Blake for Phase II. 
The committee should determine whether 
or nol there is enough resolution in 
proposals by Hamilton and Aycock's to be 
ready to enter into Phase II contracts. 

Fees for this phase need to be 

determined. Lothar Baumgarten has 

requested $25,000. Alice Aycock has 
requested 530,000. 

Phase III; Implementation 

Marian Goodman, on behalf of Lothar 

Raumgarten, has requested an additional 

$100,000 fee for implementation, 

bringing this artist's total design fee 

to close to $150,000 (inclusive of 

t ravel costs ) . 

Goodman is demanding resolution of this 
matter before the artist does any more 
work on the project. Her justification 
for this fee level is the artist's 
professional experience, international 
reputat ion, and the market value of his 
work . 

\1 ice Aycock has requested fees of 10 - 
15% of the implementation budget; i.e. 
$25,000 - $37,500 for a $250,000 project 
or $10,000 - $60,000 for a $400,000 
project. Travel expenses would be 
add i t ion.il . 



Air 


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The 


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Adv 


i so r; 


Apr 


i 1 1 


Pon 


t i ou 


to 


deve 


be 


made 


muc 


h |>r 


i n 


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r>rr 


i c i e 



si meeting of the Airport Art 

y Committee is scheduled for 

I h. Jason Yuen and Susan 

s wi 1 I meet prior to that meeting 

lop the agenda. An effort will 

on the pari of staff to do as 
e-meeting preparation as possible 
r to make the meetings as 
nl as poss i bl e . 



Staf f Re commend at i on : 

I'h" Airpnrl , in addition to Jason, has 
I wo members and alternates serving on 



the committee. Staff recommendation is 
for the VAC to appoint an alternate for 
Commissioner LaRocca and to consider 
whether or not one other member should 
be appointed to the committee. 

5. Market Street Master Plan 

1. Discussion of coordination and 
pr i nt i ng costs . 

2. Mid-Market rezoning and Percent- 
for-Art requirement 

f> . Ex pi orator ium 

Proposed film program for Market St. 

7. Embarcadero Art. Program 

Panel update and Progress Report 

8. Sunnydale Pump Station 

Progress Report 

B. GALLERY 

1 . Fi sea 1 Agent 

The City Attorney's office is to decide on 
the legality and means for (tie Gallery to 
have a fiscal agent. To date, the issue is 
unresolved. Because the Gallery does not 
have access to funds necessary for City Site 
installations and gallery exhibits, no shows 
have been scheduled beyond Common Knowled ge, 
which opens April 25, 1991. 

2 . Ex hi hi ti oris 

Ot.ras Ca ras (wen king title): Exhibit is to 
coincide with the C.A.R.A. exhibit at the San 
Francisco Museum of Modern Art, which opens 
June 27, 1991. The Gallery will select 3-5 
artists for in-depth show, possible 
concurrent solo exhibits. Exhibit/motion 
will be finalized for Visual Arts Committee 
meeti ng i n Apr i 1 . 



Dates: To be announced, contingent on fiscal 

agent . 

Artists being considered: 

Gustavo Rivera 

Rico Sal inas 

J nana Alicia 

Emmanuel Montoya 

Erin Goodwin-Guerrero 

Jerry Concha 

Ester Hernandez 

Eva Garcia 



Frank Lopez-Mo tnyk 
Lorraine Garcia 
Sal Garcia 
Daniel Galvez 
and others 

Staff recommendation: 

Approval of title and theme 

Arts Education 

Student intern Julia Prashares, Museum 
Studies, San Francisco State University, has 
designed an outreach project for high school 
students in conjunction with "Common 
Knowledge" exhibit. She will provide docent 
tour of exhibit for classes and/or conduct 
classroom lectures. 

Exploration: City Site - 1991 

Jurors Gyongy Laky, Renny Pritikin and Larry 

Rinder have selected, and the Gallery 

Advisory Committee has approved, three 

artists for the 1991 City Site exhibition. 

They are: 

1 . Charles Gute 

2 . Mie Preckler 

3. Bernie Lubell 

Written proposals enclosed 

Staff recommendation: Approval of these 
artist's proposals to install site works in 
the lot adjacent to the gallery under the 
Exploration: City Site program, contingent 
on establishing a fiscal agent to receive and 
expend grants in support of the program. 

Other Information 

Art Programs, Inc., Linda Evans, Director, 
produced a poster in commemoration of the 
Embarcadero Freeway demolition. The poster 
features a work by Wayne Thiebaud, and is 
selling for $10.00. Art Programs will donate 
profits to the Arts commission Gallery and 
Potrero Hill Neighborhood House. 




25 Von Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. C A 94102 

(415)564-9671 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
RalV Okamoto 
Dodie Rosekrans 



MINUTES TO VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE MEETING 
MARCH 27, 1991 



Commissioners Present: 

Anne Healy (Chair) 

Nancy Boas 

Amalia Mesa-Baines 

Robert LaRocca (did not arrive until item #111.) 

Staff Present: 

Manton 
Tonia Macneil 
Susan Pontious 

The meeting was called to order at 2:30 p.m. by 
Commissioner Healy. 

I. Moscone/Howard St. 

The Committee reviewed the proposal phase 
guidelines for the Moscone/Howard St. project, 
project calendar was modified as follows: 



The 



June 17th: Arrival of proposals and presentation 
of proposals by the artists. 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Cmc Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



June 18th - 19th: Review of proposals by other 
city agencies and response to Visual Arts Committee 
regarding concerns, preferences, etc. 

June 20th: Selection of winning proposal 

It was agreed that the presentations will be 
scheduled 1 hour apart; the artists will be limited 
to a 45 minute presentation, which would allow for 
15 minutes for the committee to discuss the 
proposal before the next presentation. 

Discussion ensued regarding the proposal format. 
Tonia Macneil reported that the artists requested 
that the proposals be limited to a scale model 
and/or no more than one 30" X 40" board. 

Commissioner Boas thought that 1 board was not 
enough, and that 5 boards should be allowed. 
Commissioner Healy felt that up to 3 boards was 
adequate . 



Commissioner Healy moved that the proposal would be 
in the form of a model with no more than 3 boards. 
Commissioner Mesa-Baines seconded. 

Vote: Ayes: Commissioners Healy and Mesa-Baines 
Nay: Commissioner Boas 

It was also agreed that only the team leader would 
be reimbursed for travel and overnight 
accommodations for the project proposal 
presentation. Other team members could come to the 
presentation if they so desired, but at their own 
expense . 

Commissioner Mesa-Baines moved to approve the 
project proposal guidelines. Commissioner Healy 
seconded. It was so moved. 

II. Art Enrichment: Tenderloin Recreation Center 

Tim Lilliquist from the Recreation and Park Dept . 
and Bob Appelton from the Bureau of Architecture 
reported on a new capital improvement project in 
the form of a new playground and recreation center. 
The construction budget is approximately 3 million 
dollars, which would include approximately $60,000 
for art enrichment. The new center will be 
directed towards grammar school age children and 
will provide a controlled access to the playground. 

Lilliquist and Appelton reported that they were 
most interested in an artwork that could be 
incorporated into the architecture in the interior 
of the building. 

The committee expressed interest in identifying an 
artist that would respond well to the target 
audience (primarily Vietnamese and Asian children) 
and any pertinent information collected from the 
community meetings about the project. 

It was agreed that staff would develop a prospectus 
and process to select an artist for committee 
review at an upcoming meeting. 

III. Minutes 

A. Minutes for Feb. 20, 1991 meeting 

Commissioner Boas had two corrections: 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page 



- 



Kathy Page spoke to the committee on behalf of the 
Library Commission's concerns regarding the Aycock 
proposal . Specifically they centered around the 
location and safety of the proposal. They were 
concerned that the sculpture would take up too much 
room to be able to use the rooftop for receptions. 
There was also a safety concern relative to 
attracting children to climb on the structure. 

Other general issues included: 

1 • Library Commission President Steve Coulter 

hoped that one of the artists' proposals could 
be used as a visual symbol or logo for the 
library to use for fundraising purposes. 

2. The other 3 artists' proposals were linked 
thematically to the meaning of a library, 
whereas Aycock 's proposal did not seem to have 
a direct reference to its location at the 
library. 

3. The Library Commission was looking to defray 
construction costs, and were looking to the 
art proposals to enhance what kind of building 
that they could have for their limited budget. 
She felt that the other proposals achieved 
this, but that Aycock's did not. 

Commissioners Healy and Boas thanked Ms. Page for 
her comments, each expressed having similar 
concerns. Discussion ensued regarding the original 
charge to the artists, and Commissioner Healy 
clarified that it was to collaborate with the 
architects, not specifically to design integrated 
artworks . 

Jill Manton reported that she had spoken to the 
architects and that they expressed their strong 
desire to continue working with Aycock in the hope 
that her project for the rooftop could be revised 
and resolved. 

Commissioner Healy said that she felt that this was 
also the feeling of the committee. She expressed 
faith in Aycock as an artist and said that she 
would like to give her every opportunity to develop 
an acceptable proposal . 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page 



r 



1. For the Islais Creek Pump Station, the 
record should reflect that she supports 
using the art enrichment funds for the 
Hunter's Point Cultural Center. 

2. Regarding Alice Aycock's proposal for the 
new library, the record should reflect 
that she expressed concerns regarding the 
appropriateness of a sculpture in the 
courtyard. 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the 
minutes as corrected. Commissioner Mesa- 
Baines seconded. It was so moved. 

B. New Method for Minutes 

Staff presented a recommendation for a change 
in procedure for how the minutes are recorded. 
At the end of a discussion, each commissioner 
would be responsible for summarizing his/her 
point of view. The Chair would then present 
the consensus of the majority, or call for a 
vote if necessary. 

Commissioner Healy moved to adopt this new 
procedure; Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It 
was so moved. 

IV. Anthony St. Urban Garden 

Artist George Gonzales presented his design 
proposal for an open space/pedestrian plaza for One 
Second Street in fulfillment of their 1% for art 
requirement . 

The artist's proposal was selected from 5 finalist 
by a panel made up of John Caldwell, Jill Manton, 
Rene Pritikin and Steven Oliver. 

The proposal created a combination children's play 
area and lunch area with a see-saw, granite slide, 
seating areas and plantings. 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the artist's 
design; Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so 
moved. 

V. Art Enrichment: Main Library; Alice Aycock 
Proposal 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 3 



- 



Commissioner Boas said that she also supported the 
idea of giving the artist another opportunity, but 
that she thought that this (the rooftop sculpture) 
was not the approach, and would prefer to see the 
artist work more in the manner of her first 
proposal . 

Commissioner Healy directed staff to prepare a 
letter to the artist and the architects expressing 
the mutual concerns of both the library and the 
Arts Commission. 

Jill Manton proposed that the artist be given an 
additional fee for continued work because her 
contract was for one proposal only. 

Commissioner Mesa-Baines said that she was also 
concerned about usage (of the rooftop), but also 
felt that we need to give the artist another 
opportunity. However, she said that the committee 
has to face the possibility that this may not work 
out . 

Commissioner LaRocca said that in his business, the 
designer doesn't get an additional fee, but has to 
keep designing until he has a proposal that is 
acceptable. He supports offering additional fee to 
the artist, but stresses that this payment would be 
final . 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve a contract 
extension through June 30, 1991 for Alice Aycock 
with an additional fee of $3,000. Commissioner 
LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 

Commissioner Healy also moved to approve contract 
extensions for Nayland Blake and Ann Hamilton 
through June 30, 1991. Commissioner Mesa-Baines 
seconded. It was so moved. 

Further discussion of library issues was deferred 
until item # 

VI. Art Enrichment: San Andreas Water Treatment Plant 

Artists Tim Collins and Reiko Goto gave the 
committee a progress report on their project for 
the San Andreas Water Treatment Plant. To date, 
the artists have been meeting with various Water 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page 



Department staff and gathering information. Now 
they are trying to clarify the issues and develop a 
way of presenting the information in an exciting 
format . 

Commissioner LaRocca suggested that the team see 
the "book" format as a generic form that could be 
interpreted in a variety of ways; for instance, it 
could be a box with placards that could be taken 
out and manipulated in a variety of ways. The idea 
is to communicate science in a manner that evokes a 
creative response. 

Commissioner Boas encouraged to artists to go with 
their strengths; to take the information and do 
with it what they do best. 

Commissioner Healy said that she would like to see 
the artists deal with materials and process, 
including sound. 

Tonia Macneil said that the full proposal was due 
in June. Commissioner Healy felt that the 
committee should see more of the proposal before 
then. It was suggested that a special meeting be 
scheduled in May prior to the full Arts Commission 
meeting . 

VII. Market Street Master Plan 

Jill Manton reported that the design team was 
nearing completion of their preliminary overview of 
the plan. Issues have arisen regarding the cost of 
printing and some of the team's ideas for the 
document that exceeds their expertise and that they 
would like additional funds to hire the necessary 
help . 

Topher Delaney reported that the goal is to produce 
a document that will also serve as a marketing tool 
to encourage funding for the project and 2 ) is 
elevated to be a work of art in and of itself. The 
team then discussed in greater detail some of their 
"seeding" activities presented at previous Visual 
Arts Committee meetings. 

A proposed budget for the additional cost of 
document production and seeding activities was 
reviewed. It was agreed that the cost of the 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 6 



following line items would be added to the team's 
contract : 

Editor: $2,000 

Reprographic costs: $2,000 

Artwork for report: $2,500 

Coordination of seed projects: $5,000 

Design fee for posters: $1,500 

Design fee for banners: $2,000 

TOTAL: $15,000 

Other proposed program costs in the form of 
additional printing costs for the Master Plan 
document ($12,000) and the posters ($16,000), 
rental of the freeway billboard ($6,000) and 
production of the banners ( unbudgeted ) , would be 
paid directly by the Arts Commission. 

It was agreed that the consultants would supply the 
Arts Commission with camera ready artwork by the 
April 30th date specified in their contract. 

Jill Manton said that she also wanted to include 
the Castro Theater Project in the seeding 
activities as she had already laid the groundwork. 

It was agreed that the banners would be placed 
around the Halladie Visitor's Center area as it was 
the general consensus that this was "the heart of 
the street" . 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the 1 ) contract 
modification for the Market Street Design team to 
provide for an additional $15,000 for expanded 
services relating to the seed activities and 
document production; 2) to approve a contract 
extension through June 30, 1991 to allow for the 
seeding activities to take place; and 3) to approve 
the budget proposed for printing the master plan 
document, the billboard rental, and the production 
of banners. Commissioner Mesa Baines seconded. It 
was so moved. 

VIII. Mid-Market Zoning 

Paul Lord from the Planning Dept . and Jill Manton 
reported that they have been investigating 
coordinating the Market Street Master Plan with the 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page 



percent-f or-art requirement for developers in the 
mid-Market St. area. Under investigation is the 
possibility that developers could contribute to art 
concepts outlined in the master plan in 
satisfaction of their percent-f or-art requirement. 
The two will meet with Doug Wright and Eva 
Lieberman to discuss the idea further. George 
Williams from Planning will also have to be 
convinced that temporary art works would qualify as 
satisfaction to the percent-f or-art requirement. 

Commissioner Healy moved to endorse exploration of 
coordinating the Market Street Master Plan with the 
percent-for-art requirement in the Planning Dept . 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 

IX. Exploratorium Film Screening at Hallidie Plaza 

Liz Keim from the Exploratorium reported on the 
film screening being proposed for Halladie Plaza as 
a joint project between the Exploratorium and the 
Arts Commission. The Exploratorium is requesting a 
$600 contribution from the Arts Commission. The 
retaining wall as well as the Flood Building are 
being examined as possible backdrops for the 
screening . 

Commissioner Boas said that she wanted to make sure 
that the Art Commission gets proper credit for 
their participation. The Exploratorium magazine 
did not credit the Art Commission for the San Bruno 
Jail project and she would like this rectified if 
possible . 

Commissioner Boas moved to approve the film project 
budget of $600 with the stipulation that the Art 
Commission receive credit in all publicity. The 
motion was seconded by Commissioner LaRocca. It 
was so moved. 

X. Art Enrichment: Kezar Stadium 

Susan Pontious reported that a letter had been 
written on behalf of both the Visual Arts and Civic 
Design Committees stating their objections to the 
proposed relocation of the fence at Kezar Stadium. 
Commissioner LaRocca testified at the Recreation 
and Park Commission that the Art Commission would 
not approve this proposed design change. The 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 8 



Commissioner Mesa-Baines said that fees should be 
based on the complexity of the piece and that a 
range in the professional standing of artists had 
to be considered, but that she challenged the idea 
that the only good art was blue chip art; the 
Commission needed to invest in the future. She 
wanted to include Lothar, but that it might not be 
possible . 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve an additional 
fee range for Lothar Baumgarten between $75,000 - 
$85,000. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. 
Ayes: Commissioners Healy, LaRocca and Mesa- 
Baines. 
Nays: Commissioner Boas. 

XT I. Art. Enrichment: Airport 

Susan Pontious reported that she has requested a 
second commissioner to join Commissioner LaRocca on 
the Airport Art Steering Committee. She said that 
the Chair had already appointed herself as the 
second member and Commissioner Mesa-Baines as an 
alternate . 

Commissioner Boas said that she had wanted to serve 
on that committee and challenged the Chair's 
decision. 

Commissioner Healy said that the requirements she 
considered for committee representation were as 
follows . 
1 . Committee experience 

2. Public art experience 

3. Aesthetic judgement 

Commissioner Boas then questioned the procedure for 
the Chair's authority to appoint representatives. 
She felt that the Chair could make a 
recommendation, but that it had to be approved by 
the committee. 

Commissioner LaRocca moved that Commissioner Healy 
be appointed as the second member of the Airport 
Art Steering Committee and that Commissioner Mesa- 
Baines be appointed as the 1st alternate. 
Commissioner Mesa-Baines seconded. 

Ayes: Commissioners Healy, LaRocca and Mesa-Baines 
Nays: Commissioner Boas 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 10 



Commissioner Healy moved that Commissioner Boas be 
appointed as the second alternate to serve on the 
Airport Art Steering Committee. Commissioner 
LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 

Susan reported that the first meeting of the 
Airport Art Steering Committee was scheduled for 
April 4th. She reviewed the history and purpose of 
the old Joint Committee, and outlined how the 
Airport Art Steering Committee (AASC) would be 
similar and how it would differ. 

The committee confirmed that the purpose of the 
Airport Art Steering Committee would be to come to 
agreement on issues and make recommendations to the 
respective commissions. In addition, it would 
engage in planning and policy development. However, 
unlike the old Joint Committee, the AASC would not 
engage in direct artist selection. The artist 
selection method that the Art Commission would 
propose was one of an outside panel whose members 
would be approved by the AASC. Representatives from 
the Visual Arts Committee and Airport could serve 
as panel liaisons. 

XIII. Policy Meeting 

It was agreed that a policy meeting needed to be 
set up with the Visual Arts Committee, the public 
art staff, Margie O'Driscoll and Barbara Sklar to 
discuss committee roles and procedures. The 
meeting date was set for May 6th at 1 p.m. 

XIV. Art Enrichment: Sunnydale Pump Station 

Jill Manton reported that there were again problems 
with the Department of Public Works making changes 
to the artist's design without consultation and 
approval from the artist or the Art Commission. 

The Committee directed that a letter should be 
written to DPW similar to the one written to the 
Recreation and Park Commission relative to Kezar 
Stadium. The issue should also be explored with 
Kathryn Pennypacker to see what can be done legally 
to stop such unauthorized changes. 

XV. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 11 



r 



Recreation and Park Commission then voted not to 
change the location of the fence. 

XI. Art Enrichment: Library 

The Committee discussed the issue of Lothar 
Baumgarten's fee. Susan Pontious reported that his 
agent, Marian Goodman, had requested an additional 
$125,000 for his participation through design 
development and implementation. This would make 
his total fee for participating in the project to 
$140,000 plus an additional $7,500 for travel. 

Jill Manton reviewed the general fee structure 
guidelines that the Commission had followed in the 
past. She pointed out that the Commission has 
consistently allowed a range of 10-20% of the 
project cost of integrated art works for artist 
fees. While this is the recommended range, the 
Commission can adjust each situation as is 
appropriate. Manton also outlined a preliminary 
budget for the library art enrichment program. Out 
of a total budget of approximately 1.8 million 
dollars, $180,000 had to be allowed for 
administrative costs and an additional $100,000 for 
works by multi-cultural artists. All four of the 
other artists' proposals had to be paid for from 
the remaining funds. 

She felt that Baumgarten's requested fee was to 

high relative to the rest of the project budget. 

She recommended a total fee of $100,000, inclusive 
for all phases of work. 

Discussion ensued relative to the artist's fee 
request and Art Commission policy relative to fee 
schedules, and the overall project budget. 

Commissioner Boas said that she wanted to challenge 
the idea of treating all the artists equally in 
terms of fee awards. She didn't think that arrived 
artists should be paid the same as emerging 
artists . 

Commissioner Healy said that it was not the policy 
to treat all the artists equally in terms of fee 
awards; there was always going to be a range. 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page 



c 



Jill Manton reported on the upcoming Promenade 
screening scheduled for Friday, March 29th and the 
first Gateway screening scheduled for April 18th. 

Commissioner Boas ' s role as project liaison was 
clarified. She was the project liaison for the 
master planning phase and now was the liaison for 
the Signage Project. 

XVI. Gallery 

Commissioner Amalia Mesa-Baines moved to approve 
proposals made by Charles Gute, Mie Preckler and 
Bernie Lubell for the 1991 Exploration City Site 
exhibits. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was 
so moved. 

XVII. Old Business: Moscone/Howard St. 

Commissioner Boas brought up for further discussion 
her recommendation that a preliminary meeting be 
set up with the with Germaine Wong, the 
Construction Manager and John Cribbs, the project 
manager, as soon as possible to inform them of the 
Art Commission's possible plans for the area. She 
felt that this would potentially save the 
Commission money in later change orders. 

Discussion ensued relative to the necessity of 
scheduling this meeting now, or waiting until the 
Commission had the artists proposals for the area. 

Commissioner Healy felt that a meeting now was 
premature; that it would be better to wait one 
month for the artist's proposals. 

Commissioner Boas moved that a meeting should be 
scheduled before 1 month between herself, 
Commissioner Healy, staff, Germaine Wong, the 
Construction Manager, and John Cribbs to discuss 
the Arts Commission's possible plans for the area. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. 

Ayes: Commissioners Boas, LaRocca, and Mesa-Baines 
Nay: Commissioner Healy 

Commissioner Healy modified the motion to stipulate 
that she alone would be the Committee 
representative at the meeting. 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 12 



c 



io absolve Surety Company of the Pacific of 
liability for their $34,000 performance bond issued 
to Nelson Ironworks for the fabrication of the 
Kezar Stadium Gates contingent on receipt and staff 
verification of proof of payment by contractor of 
all labor, suppliers and subcontractors. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: To approve final payment of $2,000 to 
Gary Grahm for the Great Sea Wall Medallion. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: To approve One Second Street Inc.'s art 
proposal, designed by George Gonzales, for the 
Anthony Street Urban Garden. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

8. Ordered: To approve a contract extension for Alice 
Aycock through June 30, 1991, and to increase her 
contract by $3,000 for redesign of her proposal for 
the library. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

9. Ordered: To approve extension of design contracts 
for Ann Hamilton and Nayland Blake through June 30, 
1991. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

10. Ordered: To approve a contract extension for the 
Market Street Design Team through June 30th, 1991 
and to increase the contract by $15,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

11. Ordered: To approve the "seeding" plan concepts 
and budget proposed by the Market St. Design Team 
for increased printing costs ($6,000) for the 
Master Plan document; Poster series for Gannett 
Kiosks ($16,000); freeway billboard ($6,000), and 
banners (cost as yet to be determined). 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 14 



, 



r 



Note: The recording secretary ran out of recording 
tape by the time this item was discussed. Memory 
and the recollections of the parties present differ 
as to the sequence of the above events, i.e. 
whether or not the motion was modified before the 
vote, or whether the order was modified by the 
Chair after the vote. 

By direction of the Chair, the resolution sent to 
the full Arts Commission for approval listed 
Commissioner Healy as the sole Committee 
representative at this meeting . 



Orders and Reports: 

1. Ordered: The format for finalist's proposals for 
Moscone Center/Howard St. Project will be in the 
form of a model and/or no more than three 30" x 40' 
boards . 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Ayes : Commissioners Healy, LaRocca and 

Mesa-Baines 

Nays : Commissioner Boas 

2. Ordered: Approval of Moscone Center/Howard Street 
Proposal Phase Guidelines as modified. 

Moved: Commissioner Mesa-Baines 
Vote: Unanimous 

3. Ordered: Approval of Minutes of Feb. 20th meeting 
as corrected. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: To adopt the new procedure for recording 
the minutes as proposed by staff. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: 

a) to approve reimbursement of $775.43 to Alan 
Fleming for building permit for Kezar Stadium 
Gates ; 

b) to approve final payment to Alan Fleming of 
$3,500 on fabrication contract for Kezar Stadium 
Gates ; 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 13 



c 



12. Ordered: To endorse the exploration of the 
possibility of coordinating the Market Street Art 
Master Plan with the percent-f or-art requirement in 
the San Francisco Planning Dept . 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

13. Ordered: To approve the expenditure fo $600 to 
help support the film program proposed by the 
Exploratorium for Hallidie Plaza, with the 
understanding that all publicity regarding the film 
program will credit the San Francisco Art 
Commission . 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

14. Ordered: To approve offering Lothar Baumgarten a 
fee range between $75,000 - $85,000 for design 
development and implementation of his proposals for 
the new main library. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Ayes : Commissioners Healy, LaRocca and 

Mesa-Baines; Nays : Commissioner Boas 

15. Ordered: That Commissioner Healy be appointed as 
the second member to serve with Commissioner 
LaRocca on the Airport Art Steering Committee and 
that Commissioner Mesa-Baines be appointed as the 
first alternate. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 

Vote: Ayes : Commissioners Healy, LaRocca, and 

Mesa-Baines. Nays : Commissioner Boas 

16. Ordered: 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

17. Ordered: To approve proposals by Charles Gute, Mie 
Preckler and Bernie Lubell for the Exploration: 
City Sites installations. 

Moved: Amalia Mesa-Baines 
Vote: Unanimous 

18. Ordered: That Commissioner Healy, and staff meet 
with Germaine Wong, the Moscone Center/Howard 
Street construction manager, and John Cribbs as 



VAC 3/27/91sp Page - 15 



; 



soon as possible to inform them of the Art 

Commission's plans for the area. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vote: Ayes: Commissioners Boas, LaRocca, and 

Mesa-Baines; Nays : Commissioner Healy. 



Submitted: 




iusan PcWtious 
Curator 



VAC 3/27/91sp 



Page - 16 



u 



r 



JAYMONT 



March 1, 1991 



Ms. Jill Manton 
San Francisco Arts Commission 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240 
San Francisco, CA 94102 



Dear Jill: 

I would like to request that One Second Street Incorporated' s 
art proposal for the Anthony Street Urban Garden be considered 
at the March 18th meeting of the Civic Design Committee and at 
the March 20th meeting of the Visual Arts Committee. At this 
time, we will be seeking approval of our schematic and design 
development plans. 

As you know, One Second Street Incorporated created and 
sponsored an art contest to ensure that the art selected for the 
One Second Street Project would be of the highest quality. The 
first step in this process was to organize an Art Review 
Committee whose task would be to administer the contest and to 
ultimately select the artist. The Art Review Committee was 
composed of members of the local arts community who had 
particular awareness of the benefits of public art. The members 
of this committee are as follows: 

Jill Manton 

Coordinator, Art in Public Spaces 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

John Caldwell 

Curator of Painting and Sculpture 

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 

Renny Pritikin 

Director 

New Langton Arts 

Steven H. Oliver 
Patron of the Arts 



Jaymont Properties Incorporated 

88 Kearny Street. Suite 1450, San Franciseo, CA 94108 (415) 986- 



^ 



L 



Ms. Jill Manton 
March 1, 1991 
Page 2 

The Art Review Committee was asked to first assemble a 
representative body of art from local, national and 
international artists from which five finalists could be 
derived. After reviewing more than 300 slides representing the 
work of more than 40 artists, five artists were invited to 
present site specific art proposals for incorporation into the 
project. An honorarium of $2,000 was paid to each of the 
artists to encourage them to develop art proposals responsive to 
the project and its environment. After a careful review of the 
five proposals with input from the Project architect and the 
Planning Department staff, George Gonzalez of Bolinas was 
selected to create a work of art in the Anthony Street Urban 
Garden. 

George Gonzalez works with "landscaped elements" which 
artistically incorporate plant and rock formations into a 
multi-sensory experience. His work includes the lyrical "Wave 
Organ" near the St. Francis Yacht Club which has received 
widespread acclaim. George Gonzalez has been noted for his 
achievements in such diverse publications as the San Francisco 
Chronicle, The Washington Post and Image Magazine as well as a 
featured artist on local, national and international radio and 
television stations. 

George Gonzalez's art piece for Anthony Street comprises the 
entire landscape and site work design for the Anthony Street 
Urban Garden. His work consists of landscape elements and 
sculptures which also serve as play structures for children, 
including a slide and a see-saw. 

One sculptural element is a large stone in excess of eight feet 
in height, which has been split to accommodate a four foot wide 
plexiglass prism which will both reflect light and act as a 
slide for children. The other sculpture is a six foot iron 
element which can also serve as a child's see-saw. The 
landscape elements stimulate one's sense of vision and smell 
through the combination of unique materials. Three mature maple 
trees and two mature sycamore trees are situated to give relief 
from the urban setting as well as a visual reminder of the 
change of seasons. Corsican mint is set in the joints of the 
white granite paving stones to both visually soften the ground 
and to create a sweet scent when it is crushed underfoot. The 
circular pads surrounding the base of the sculptures are crushed 
cocoa husks which not only soften a child's landing but also 
release a sweet scent. Seating for approximately 46 will be 



* 



<L 



Ms. Jill Manton 
March 1, 1991 
Page 3 



provided by both hand set stone benches as well as individual 
granite stones set in random conversation groups. The entire 
assembly is intended as a natural oasis within the downtown 
urban environment. It should function equally well as a restive 
and contemplative space for grownups and as a creative play 
space for children in the adjacent child care facility. 

We welcome the opportunity to present our art concept to the 
Civic Design Committee and the Visual Arts Committee. Please 
inform us if the aforementioned meeting dates are available. 



Sincerely, 




Mark G. Stefan 
Regional Vice/President 



cc : George Gonzalez 

MGS/df /1627 



r 



t 




25 Van New Avenue 
Stile 240 

Sun Francisco. CA 94102 
(415)554 9671 



t>mFj- 



MOSCONE CkNTKR/IIOWARl) STREET 
PUIIL10 ART PROGRAM 



PROPOSAL 1'IIASK 



CALENDAR 



MAYOR 
Aft Agrx>s 



Apri I f> 



May fi 



Del ivci-y Lo candidates of plans and 
informal ion as requested at. briefing 

Candidates' budget and site questions 
del ivered to Arts Commission 



May 1 7 
June 1 A 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barboia Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boos 
Vice President 

Vernon Altey 

Stanley Elchelbaum JtlllO 14 

Kim Fowler 

Daniel Genera 

Anne Heory 

John Krlken 

Robert F LaRocca 

Amolla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. June 17, 18 

Ral Y. Okamoto 

Dodle Rosekrons 
^^ 
"_ June 19 

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 

Fine A/ts Museum 

library Commission. 

Planning Commission, 

Recreation and Park APPROVAL PROCESS 

Commission 



RepJ ies due to candidates 

Deadline Cor receipt of completed 
proposa 1 s 

Present at ions by candidates to the 
Select ion Panel and associated 
agenc i e s 

Review of Proposals by Commission, 
staff and agencies 

Meet ing of Selection Panel to select 
f i na list 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Colectlon 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public A;t Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

Slate-Local Partnership 

415-554 9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554 9679 



The Select ion Panel and representat i ves of relevant 
agencies will meet t w i ce to make the selection, the first 
time will be to hear the presentations of the candidates, 
the second to make the decision. The intervening days 
will be an opportunity for an ongoing review in order lo 
col lect. comments from various agencies and interested 
individuals and to provide candidates with the opportunit; 
to answer any quest ions raised at. the presentations. 
Candidates wil I have I fi minutes each Lo make their 
presentation. The final select ion will be made on the 
basis of the criteria noted below. It is understood that 
the winning proposal will undergo detailed review and 
possible re\ isiou Pol lowing the proposal phase. 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Sheet 
415-554-9682 




twm-MSruiM EF-3/20/9' 



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CRITERIA 

I he siiceessfu I proposn I will: 

'■ l "' substantially feasible; structurally, logistic-ally 
and I i nanc i a J I y . 

... create a sense of arrival , of symbolic welcome to 
Moscorie Convenl ion ("enter 

•' • serve to unify ami focus I lie site 

I • I"' "l an enduring na I u re 

FORMAT 

Proposals may to in I he form of a model and/or board. The 
ScaLe of the model wiJ I be 1/H"= 1 ' . The board may be one 
30 n 10" board, or less. there is no scale requirement 
for- images presented on I lie board. Video tape may be used 
to represent kinetic elements. A full narrative statement 
should accompany the proposal , including a description of 
the materials t o be used as we I 1 as a tentative budget. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Proposal Phase wi I 1 be complete by June '2 1 , 1991 . We 
hope to provide you with al I of the materials you 
req lies ted by April 5 , at the latest. During this period, 
al 1 requests for information should be addressed to me, 
Tonia Macneil, at (115) 554-9671, and I will relay them to 
the proper agency. Please put your - questions in writing 
if at all possible and indicate whether the issue is 
private and confidential or- project-wide. I will be 
al. tempi ing to provide everyone with as much common 
information as possible, and ask that you define the 
I imits of your privacy. 

With respect to your- presentations, our - limited project 
budget will only provide travel reimbursement for one 
person for a single night . If more than one member - of 
your learn would I ike lo be present , please inform me, and 
1 will let you know whether - it will be appropriate. The 
issue is of course e q 1 1 i I a b i 1 i I y . 

In regard to the tentative budget, the upper - Limit of the 
budget available to the selected candidate is $500,000. 
Depending upon the location of the design elements, some 
architectural credits and other forms of cooperation may 



twm-MSCBRlEF-3/20/91 Page 



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e available. As these amounts are very difficult to 
define al this lime, il is understood that your tentative 
budget will be jus! that, and that there may be changes in 
the actual final dollar cost as the design is further 
deve loped . 

REIMBURSEMENT 

I lie Arts Commission will reimburse you for proposals and 
related expenses upon delivery of the proposal. Please 
al low 4 Lo G weeks for receipt of your check following the 
submission of an invoice. A sample invoice is enclosed. 



Lwm-MSCBRIEF-3/20/91 



Page - 3 




SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

I 55 Grove Street. San Francisco. California 94 1 02 (415) 554-9682 

March 1991 

Dear Educator: 

: am a Museum Studies graduate student at S.F.S.U., and am very 
interested in arts education. As part of my internship at 
the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery I am creating 
curriculum to be used in an arts outreach program. 

This April and May the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery 
will offer this arts education outreach to local schools. 
The proposed arts program consists of two options - either a 
tour of the S.F. Arts Commission Gallery, and/or classroom 
discussion and related arts activity at your school led by 
a gallery intern. 

Both the gallery tours and slide illustrated lectures will 
give students the opportunity to see Bay Area artists whose 
work is on the cutting edge of contemporary art. The gallery's 
upcoming exhibition, "Common Knowledge", which opens on April 
25th, will feature six artists whose work comments on images, 
ideas, or materials found commonly in public spaces. 

Before I draw up the final plans for the gallery's arts 
curriculum, I would like to know which type of programming 
would best fit the needs of your class. 

Please take a few minutes to complete the short survey on the 
following page. Return the survey as soon as possible to the 
S.F. Arts Commission Gallery by using the enclosed envelope. 

Thank you. 

Sincerely, 

Julia Brashares 

Intern 

S.F. Arts Commission Gallery 



A pro|ect of the S.F. Arts Commission and Friends of the Arts. 
Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Friday:! 1-5, Thursday 11-8, Saturday 12-5 



.Would you like to participate in the Arts Commission 

nailery s art programming for schools? yes no 

not interested, please pass this on to interested faculty.) 

2 How much time would you like to dedicate to the gallery's 

art programming? ] _ 2 hours 2 - 3 hours 

Comments 

3. Please check the below option or options that would best 
suit your needs. 



A. Students would come to the S.F. Arts Commission 



Gallery at 155 Grove Street (near Van Ness) for a short toui 
lead by gallery intern. Tour would reflect the current 
■xhibition, "Common Knowledge". Topics discussed would include: 
artist as editor, appropriation, collage, "ready-mades" , 
co-option, and the notion of original and replica. 



_B. Gallery intern would come to your classroom for 



short talk and related arts activity. 

The three lesson plans to chose from are - 

1 • "Art of Appropriation" 

Students will learn about the use of appropriated objects in 
modern art, and how this tradition has been carried on to the 
present day. The students will appropriate images of their 
own, making their own "billboard" to "advertise" their own 
message. 

. 2. "Chance, Collage, and Dreams" 

Chance, collage, and dreams all bring together disparate images 
and objects. Students will learn how the concepts of chance, 
collage, and dreams were used by two avant garde movements - 
Dada and Surrealism. Students will make an art work by a.) 
making a collage, or b. ) creating a rubbing of a surface, a 
"f rottage. " 

3. "Freeing of the Verse" 

Students will learn how avant garde groups of the early 20th 
century not only freed the image but also freed the word. 
Students will listen to poetry and complete a "word project", 
either making a calligramme (words forming pictures), or by 
writing a non-traditional rhythmic poem. 

Thank you for your time. In order that I may contact you to 
arrange scheduling for your participation in the arts program, 
please complete the following - 

Name 

Subject you teach 

Phone 

Hours you can be reached 



- 



Projected Budget 

Market Street Art in Transit Master Plan 
Document Production and Seeding Programs 



The following proposal represents an outline of expanded services 
for the completion and implementation of the first stages of the 
Art in Transit Program. 

DOCUMENTATION 

Printing Costs for Master Plan $12,000 

Based on 40 pages; similar in style to Shift Magazine; 4 color 
cover; 3000 copies; some copies would be available for sale at 
$3.50 each. ( Original budget was $6000.) 

r Editor/Writing Assistance $2 , 000 

V Reprographic Costs - Halftones, computer linotype, etc $2,000 

Based on an estimate of $50.00/ page. 

Artwork - Computer generated video photos, drafting of maps and 
graphic design assistance $2 , 500 

TOTAL DOCUMENT COSTS $18 , 500 

IMPLEMENTATION 

£ Implementation and coordination of seed projects simultaneous with 

the completion of the Master Plan $5,000 

Work includes coordination of the following projects: 

Posters for next two Gannett kiosk installations "What is the 
^L highest form of public art?" and responses to this question. 

Printing costs $16, 000 

V. Artist design fee $1, 500 

Freeway billboard "What is the highest form of Public Art?" $6,000 
(one month rental and set-up charges) 

LED signs at MUNI and BART Stations, coordinate answers 

Coordinate with media in publishing responses 

* Banners - Cost will depend on the final quantity of banners, method 
of hanging and image. Artist's Design fee $2000 



c 




25 Van Nesj Avenue 
Siuto 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 
(415)554 9671 



3:00 1 



AGENDA 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE MEETING 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1991 

3 P.M. 

SUITE 70, 25 VAN NESS 

Approval of Minutes, 3/27/91. 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Rai Y. Okamoto 
Dodle Rosekrans 



o 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N Isaacs 



3:05 II 



3: 10 III 



3 : 20IV. 



3: 30 V. 



Consent. Calendar 

To approve progress payment of $ 1 5 , OOO to 
Bruce Hasson for fabrication of grill work for 
the Bush-Pollc Parking Garage. 

Collections: Request form Palace of the 
Legion of Honor to relocate Rodin's Three 
Shades . 
Susan Pontious; Visitor: Thomas Seligman 

Art Enrichment: El 1 i s-0 ' Ferrel 1 Cargage 
Jill Manton; Visitors: Marie Zeller 

A. Request for approval of art enrichment 
concept and guidelines for Ellis- 
O'Ferrell Garage and authorize staff to 
hold competition for the slection of 
artists for the project. 

B. Appointment of Visual Arts Committee 
member as project liaison to the 
Selection Panel. 

Gal 1 ery 

Anne Meissner 

A. Approve artists selected for "Outres 
Caras" show (working title). 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



3:45 VI 



B. Discussion of proposed revision of 
gallery rental policy 

Islais Creek Pump Station 

Jilt Man t on 

Discussion of Art Enrichment Program 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



3:50 VII. Market Street Master Plan 

Jill Man ton 

Presentation of draft of plan, 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 




1:30 VIII. Arl. Enrichment: Embarcadero 

Jill Mant on 

A. Progress Report: Promenade Project 

Authorization to make payment to 
finalists for orientation meeting and 
i ha rette . 

15. Signage Project 

Request authorization to enter in 
contract with the Michael Manwaring and 
Nancj Leight for $80,000 to design and 
produce signage for the Embarcadero. 

I:40TX. Art. Enrichment: Mental Health Facility 

Request to approve the following purchases for 
the Ment a I Ilea I I h Faci lily: 

1 . Homage to Lydia Hendoza : La Heina Tejana 

by Emmanuel C. Montoya; LinoJeum 
blockprint; 36" x 5 6" 1990; $1,500.00 

2. La Trinidad Nortena; Emmanuel C. Montoya 
Tryptich Linoleum Blockprint ; 29" x 49"; 
1 989 $1 , 400 . 00 

3. Tamalada; Carmen Lomas Garza; Lithograph 
20" x 27"; 1990; $650. 

5:00 X. Art. Enrichment: Library 

Jill Manton and Susan Pontious 

A. Progress Report 

B. Request authorization to enter into 
contracts for design development with 
Nay land Blake, Anne Hamilton and Anne 
Chamberlain, and Lothar Baumgarten. 



5:20 XT 



Resolution of Moscone Meeting 



5:30 XT "I . Reschedule Policy Meeting 

5:45 XTTT. Administrative Workload 

A. Upcoming Projects 

B. Request to Board of Supervisors for 
additional administrative funds. 

C. Ordinance Revision 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94)02 

(415)554-9671 



The 



MINUTES 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

APRIL 24, 1991 

meeting was called to order at 3:30 p.m. 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amelia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
Dodle Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents o( the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



Commissioners Present: 

Anne Healy (Chair) 
Nancy Boas 
Barbara Sklar 

Staff Present: 

Manton 
Ann Meissner 
Margie O'Driscoll 
Susan Pontious 

I. Minutes for 3/27/91 

Commissioner Sklar moved to approve the committee 
minutes of 3/27/91. Commissioner Boas seconded. 
It was so moved. 

II. Consent Calendar 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the consent 
calendar: i.e. to approve a progress payment of 
$15,000 to Bruce Hasson for fabrication of grill 
work for the Bush Polk Parking garage. 
Commissioner Sklar seconded; it was so moved. 

III. Collections: Request from Palace of the Legion of 
Honor to relocate Rodin's Three Shades. 

Thomas Seligman and Steve Nash from the Legion of 
Honor made a presentation to the Visual Arts 
Committee regarding the museum's proposal to 
relocate the Three Shades underneath the skylight 
of proposed extended gallery. The museum is 
proposing this move because Three Shades is an 
extremely valuable sculpture which has been 
repeatedly vandalized in its present location. 
Another possible relocation site would be inside 
the Court of Honor, which the museum is proposing 
to fence. 

Steve Nash reported that the sculpture was 
originally purchased by subscription as a memorial 
to Raphael Weill. It may be the only existing full 
size cast of the Three Shades made in the artist's 
life time, and is valued well over $1 million. 




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approve these artists under the Visual Arts 
Committee Report. 

The selection of artists confirmed for the 
show are : 

Eva Garcia (Venus); Carlos Loarca, Rico 
Salenas and Darryl Sapien. 

Artists still being considered are Jauana 
Alicia, Emmanuel Montoya, Gustavo and Lorraine 
Garcia Nakata. 

B. Rental Policy 

Discussion of this item was removed from the 
agenda. 

The Committee gave consent to use the gallery 
for a June 6th lecture by Ruth Bernhard in 
conjunction with Photoscape. 

Art Enrichment: Islais Creek Pump Station 

Jill Manton reviewed the City Attorney's ruling 
regarding the formula for determining the per-cent 
for art and its use. The percentage is based on 
the total construction budget, but since the 
ordinance says up to 2%, the allocation could be 
negotiated to be 2% of above ground costs. The 
City Attorney maintains that the funds may not be 
used off site. Her ruling is that although the 
ordinance may have been violated in the past, that 
is not a justification for violating it again. 

Manton reported that the design of the pump station 
had been modified. It is now an unstaffed facility 
with no public access. 

Her recommendation was to either waive the Art 
Enrichment requirement, or to pursue negotiations 
with the City Attorney regarding the interpretation 
of the ordinance. 

Commissioner Boas suggested that perhaps by the 
time the building is actually built, the Arts 
Commission will have succeeded in changing the 
ordinance to allow for using the funds off site. 

Commissioner Sklar moved to reserve the right to 
exercise the Commission's art enrichment option 



VAC4/24/91sp Page 



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Jill Manton reported that the team of Michael 
Manwaring and Nancy Leigh Olmstead has been 
selected to design the Embarcadero signage. 
They will be establishing a literary advisory 
team to help them. 

Commissioner Boas moved to approve entering 
into contract with Michael Manwaring and Nancy 
Leigh Olmstead for $80,000 to design the 
Embarcadero signage. Commissioner Sklar 
seconded. It was so moved. 

VIII. Art Enrichment: Library 

A. Progress Report 

Susan Pontious gave a progress report on the 
art enrichment for the library. She reported 
that the architects had narrowed the wall 
infor Nayland Blakes piece, and that this 
would necessitate some redesign of the art 
proposal . 

Ann Hamilton and Ann Chamberlain have decided 
to pursue their proposal for the diagonal wall 
instead of the floor. 

Alice Aycock and the architects are working 
with the project engineer to see if a solution 
can be found that would allow the artist to 
resurrect her proposal for the bridge. 

No response has been received from Lothar 
Baumgarten regarding the Commission's fee 
offer . 

B. Contracts for Design Phase II. 

Commissioner Sklar moved to enter into Design 
Phase II contracts with Lothar Baumgarten 
($25,000), Ann Hamilton ($54,000) and Nayland 
Blake ($15,000). Commissioner Healy seconded. 
It was so moved. 

IX. Art Enrichment: Market St. Master Plan (continued) 

Jun Jalbuena, the writer hired by the Market St. 
team to write the master plan, requested more time 
to complete the document. It was agreed that the 
design team would supply provide the Commission 
with a summary of art ideas by 5 p.m. , April 25th, 
which would then be sent by messenger to each of 



VAC4/24/91sp Page 



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Ordered: To reserve the right to exercise the art 

enrichment option for Islais Creek Pump Station 

without specifying a particular program at this 

time . 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vote: Unanimous 

Ordered: To approve reimbursement of travel, 
Hotel, and per diem costs plus payment of an 
honorarium to the following artist teams for the 
Embarcadero Promenade Project: 1) John Roloff and 
Ed Haag; 2) Buster Simpson, Michael Davis, Richard 
Turner, and Susan Schwartzenberg ; 3) Vito Acconci, 
Barbara Soloman and Stanley Saitowitz. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

Ordered: To approve entering into a design 

contract with Michael Manwaring and Nancy Leigh 

Olmstead for $80,000 to design signage for the 

Embarcadero . 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vote: Unanimous 

Ordered: To approve entering into Phase II design 
contracts for the new main library with the 
following : 

1) Lothar Baumgarten for $25,000; 2) Nayland Blake 
for $15,000; 3) Ann Hamilton for $54,000. 

Ordered: To approve a deadline extension until May 
30, 1991 for Market Street Design Team to produce a 
camera-ready copy of the Market St. Art Master 
Plan. 



VAC4/24/91sp Page 



, 




25 Von Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okomoto 
Dodle Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents o( the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



ELLIS-O'FARRELL GARAGE 
ART ENRICHMENT PROGRAM 

Ellis-0 ' Farrell Garage is an existing, five story garage 
in the downtown shopping district. The garage is being 
seismically upgraded and two additional stories will be 
added. In addition, alterations are being made to the 
lobby and pedestrain walkway to more succesfully 
accomodate users. The facade of the structure will be 
altered because of necessary structural changes. 

Art Enrichment for the site was discussed at a meeting 
attended by representatives of the client, the Parking 
Corporation, the project architect, Whisler-Patri and 
Public Art Curator, Tonia Macneil. After reviewing the 
plans, it was agreed that the primary opportunity would be 
to articulate the pedestrian entrances and the passageway 
through the building, creating a visually exciting pathway 
between the streets. The medium discussed was light, and 
in particular neon, as it would be visible both day and 
night. It has been suggested that sound could also be 
included, thus creating a multi-sensory experience. The 
budget for the renovation is $7,000,000, of which about 1% 
would be allocated for art work. (Because the Parking 
Corporation is a private concern, and only participates 
voluntarily in the Public Art Program, we have customarily 
agreed to a 1% allocation. ) 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



Total Available Budget: 
Administration : 

Selection Costs: 

Art Enrichment: 



GUIDELINES 

$70,000 
-$7,000 
-$2,000 



$61,000 



Scope of Work: Design, fabricate and transport a work of 
art incorporating both light and sound, which articulates 
the facade entrances and pedestrian pathway of Ellis- 
O'Farrell Garage. Architectural credits will be 
Public Art Program " 06 negotiated once the design has been selected, and 
street Artists Licenses installation will be in cooperation with the architect and 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



contractor . 




twm-ELOFPROG.WPS 



Page 



Program Constituency: 

It Shoppers and Visitors to San Francisco 
2. Local Merchants and Business People 

Program Goals: 

To provide art enrichment for Ellis-0 ' Farrell Garage that: 
It Is accessible and visible to street as well as 
garage users. 

2. Serves to draw users into and through the 
pedestrian pathway between Ellis and 
O'Farrell Streets. 

3. Is visible both during the day and at night, in 
other words, involves the use of light. 

4. Reflects the busy, complex, big-city nature of 
the district. 

5. Is a way of visually reinforcing the pedestrian 
pathway . 

Program Objectives: Timeline 

1 . Concept and budget approval April 24 

2. Artist Selection June 26 

3. Proposal Selection Aug. 28 

4. Collaboration with Architect Aug-on. 

Methods of Accomplishment: 

1. Identify a Selection Panel. 

2. Hold an open competition by advertisement in 
Artweek . 

3. Through review of slides, select 4 finalists to 
submit conceptual proposals. 

4. Through review of proposals, select a finalist 
according to Program Goals. 

Qualifications 

1 . Artistic excellence as evidenced by slide review 
of past work. 

2. Assessed ability to work conceptually with a 
complex site and to interact effectively with 
architects and city agencies. 

3. Experience in and interest in working with 
light. 

4. Appropriateness of proposal design to the site. 



Staff Recommendation: 

To approve art enrichment concept and guidelines for the Ellis- 

0' Farrell Garage and to authorize staff to implement the guidelines, 

To appoint as liason of the Visual 

Arts Committee to the Selection Panel. 

twm-ELOFPROG.WPS Page - 2 



April 12, 1991 



Bush-Polk Parking Garage 
Progress Report 

On April 8, Commissioner Bob LaRocca and Tonia Macneil 
visited California Casting Foundry to view the first casts 
of Bruce Hasson's designs for the balustrades of the Bush- 
Polk Parking Garage. The balcony pieces have been completed 
and are very effective. There is some cleaning up of the 
edges to be done, but at least two pieces are essentially 
complete. The artist also showed completed molds for two 
more designs and there was discussion of a possible plaque 
design for the main lobby which would reflect the grill- 
work's aesthetic. 

Bruce Hasson is working in a timely manner and has been very 
thorough in coordinating his designs with those of the 
architect. He has requested a progress payment of $15,000 
to continue to meet his obligations to the foundry. It is 
possible to meet this request (which represents 1/2 of his 
next installment) as the artist is bonded and is clearly 
working in a most professional manner. 

Staff Recommendat ion: 



To approve a progress payment of $15,000 to Bruce Hasson for 
the fabrication of grill work for the Bush-Polk Parking 
Garage . 



III! FINE ARTS 

MUSEUMS OF 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Ml I de YOUNG Golden Gate Park 

\n Mi )RIA1 San Francisco, CA 94118 
I MUSEUM (415)750-3600 

CALIFORNIA 

PALACE OF THE 

GION OF HONOR 



April 5, 1991 



Susan Pontious 

Curator 

San Francisco Art Commission 

25 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Susan, 

As you know, the Legion of Honor is going to be closed for two 
years to be fully seismically upgraded, as well as some additional 
underground space being developed for our collection storage and 
public galleries. As part of that whole project we are trying to 
figure out every way that we can to protect the valuable sculpture 
located outside the Museums, and one of the most important is the 
Three_Shades by Rodin. It is, as you know, the only life-size casting 
of that particular image and currently is located at the end of the 
parking lot outside the Legion of Honor where it is almost invisible 
to view, and where it has been subject to numerous attacks by vandals 
over the years. 

One of our ideas is to propose to you that the Three Shades be 
moved inside the Legion of Honor and join the other Rodin sculptures. 
We are planning a suite of exhibition galleries in the newly excavated 
space under the Court of Honor that would be lit from above with a 
skylight. One of our proposals would be to place the Three Shades in 
a featured location in that new excavated area. Another possibility, 
of course, would be to place the sculpture somewhere in the Court of 
Honor where The Thinker is currently located and protect both of them 
there with a decorative iron fencing that would be able to be closed 
at night and secure the Court of Honor. 

I do have some slides that I could show the Visual Arts 
Subcommittee of the whole Legion project as well as more specifics 
about the Three Shades . I would very much appreciate being put on 
your calendar for April 24th. If you could let me know when I should 
be there, and if it would be possible to show slides I'll come 
prepared with my carousel slide tray. My office number is 750-3612. 
Thanks very much for your help. 




Thomas K. Seligman 
Deputy Director 
for Operations and Planning 

TKS:nkm 

cc: Harry Parker, Steve Nash 




SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 



1 55 Grove Street, San Francisco, California 94 1 02 (41 5) 558-4445 

June 3, 1986 

Ms. Claire Isaacs 

Director of Cultural Affairs 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

44 Hyde Street 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

RE: Usage Policy - SF Arts Commission Gallery 
Dear Claire: 

As we have discussed, the Advisory Board shares your concern about the 
appropriate definition of policy regarding the usage of the Gallery by outside 
groups. Since development of a comprehensive policy will take several months, 
this letter reflects our concerns and we'd like it to serve as an interim 
policy statement. If you would like to add any further points, please let us 
know and we'll discuss and approve them at our next Board meeting. 

1. The Gallery may only be used by outside groups whose purpose is 
consistent with the Gallery's mission. See attached mission 
statement. 

2. The Gallery may only remain open after its regular hours with express 
permission of the Director, yourself, and the President of the 
Advisory Board. 

3. The Gallery will not be available for events which, in the judgment of 
the Director, the Advisory Board, or the Director of Cultural Affairs, 
might endanger the art work on display or incur potential liability to 
the City because of injury to event participants. 

4. The Gallery will establish an appropriate fee with the outside group, 
depending on the following factors: ability of the group to pay; type 
of event; whether or not the group plans to charge for the event; 
etc. The Director will decide on the fee and will then advise the 
Advisory Board and the Director of Cultural Affairs. 

Sincerely, 



Martha Campbell 
Co-Chairperson 



MC:no 



A project of the S.F. Arts Commission and Friends of the Arts. 

GALLERY HOURS: Tuesday through Saturday: I ! - 5 PM Thursday: 11-8 PM 



Design Development Contract Request 
San Francisco Public Library Project 

Ann Hamilton and Ann Chamberlain 

Goals of second contract phase to extend through the end of June 1992 

1 ) To research and develop the specific materials, and techniques that will be used on the 
diagonal core wall of each of the five floors of the planned San Francisco Public Library, 
as it was determined in a meeting with Jennifer Sage, Kathy Simon, and Susan Pontious 
on April 17, 1991. This will include workshop meetings and sample developments with: 

a) Jim Rouane of Patrick J Rouane Inc. in San Francisco who, with his shop will 
work with us in developing the specific artisan plaster techniques that will be used on each 
floor. 

b) Harry Reese of Turkey Press in Santa Barbara who will consult in the 
development of paper and printing techniques for the folio sized sheets that will be 
embedded in the artisan plaster. 

2) To research and develop the conceptual content of the wall narratives that will relate to 
the history and communities in San Francisco. Extensive research will be conducted using 
primary documents in the holdings of the San Francisco Public Library, the San Francisco 
Historical Society, the Bancroft Library of UC Berkeley as well as the archives of various 
historical societies. At the end of this contract, the conceptual content of each floor will be 
determined along with the identification of some specific texts. 

Research consultants will include but not be limited to: 

a) Harry Reese, History of Printing and San Francisco Publishing 

b) Julian Lang, Linguist.California Native American History 

c) Yolanda Lopez, Artist, Latin American culture 

d) Malcolm Margolin, writer, Native Amercian historian and publisher 
e)Gray Brechin, writer, history of San Francisco 

f)Jenny Limn poet, Asian American culture 

g) Mildred Howard, artist,African American culture 

h)Pat Ferrero, film maker, native and Latin contact in California 

3) A calendar will be determined for final research of this material during the 
implementation phase of the project., and a budget for the actual costs for the 
implementation phase of the project. 



Design Develpment Contract Request 

San Francisco Public Library 

Ann Hamilton and Ann Chamberlain 

Budget 

Materials $3500 

Conceptual Research Assistance $6000 

6-10 Research consultancies to explore primary 

documents in the libraries of the Bay Area 

Material Research Consultants 

Harry Reese * $5000 

Jim Rouai.e $3000 

Travel: 

Airfare and per diem up to $5000 

Telephone and postage $1500 

Artists Fees for one year of work 

Ann Hamilton $15,000 

Ann Chamberlain $ 1 5 ,000 

Total: $54,000 



For this next contract phase we would like to be treated as equal collaborators on the 
development of the project 



I 



( 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heary 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
Dodle Rosekrans 



3 



OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



AGENDA 

Visual Arts Committee Meeting 

Wednesday, May 22, 1991 

3 p.m. 

25 Van Ness, Suite 70 



3:00 I. Approval of April 24 Minutes 

3:05 II. Consent Calendar 

A. Request for approval to pay Bruce Hasson 
an interim payment of $15,000 upon 
completing fabrication of grill work for 
the Bush-Polk Parking Garage. 

B. Request approval for interim payment of 
$2,000 to Jaap Bongers, contingent on 
studio visit by staff, for continuing wok 
on marble floor piece for Richmond Police 
Station. 

C. Request approval to extend FEMA 
Earthquake Contract with Atthowe Fine 
Arts Services through October, 1991. 

D. Request approval to enter into contract 
with Douglas Hollis for $20,000 for 
consulting services during construction 
period of new Sheriff's Facility and for 
the design and fabrication of interior 
furnishings for the facility. 

Note: See artist's letter dated 4/19/91, 
enclosed . Proposals for interior 
furnishings would, of course, be approved 
by Arts Commission. 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



3:10 III. Redevelopment Agency; Esplanade Artists 

Presenter: Bill Carney 
Informational report 



3:20 IV. 



San Andreas Water Treatment 



Art Enrichment: 

Plant #2 

Presenter: Tonia Macneil; Visitors: 

Collins & Reiko Goto 
Progress Report 
See Staff Report, enclosed 



Tim 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 




3:40 V. Art Enrichment: Moscone/Esplanade Ballroom 
Presenter: Tonia Macneil; Visitors: Hung 
Liu, Germaine Wong 

Presentation of revised proposal for Moscone 
Center Esplanade Ballroom. 
See Staff Report, enclosed 

4:15 VI. Art Enrichment: Moscone/Howard St. 
Presenter: Tonia Macneil 
Progress Report 

See Staff report, and letter from CAO's 
office, enclosed 

4:25 VI. Collections: Airport 

Presenter: Susan Pontious 

Update on damaged Irwin sculpture; Structural 
engineering report on feasibility of repair. 
See Staff report, enclosed 

4:35 V. Collections: Proposal to Relocate Rodin's 
Three Shades 

Presenter: Susan Pontious 
Staff report and recommendation 
See staff report, enclosed 

4:40 VI. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero 
Presenter: Jill Manton 
See staff report for the following items: 

A. Embarcadero Gateway Project, 2nd and King 
Streets 

Request approval of selected artist teams 

B. Embarcadero Promenade Project Charetts 

Project update 

C. Muni-Metro Portal and Turnabout Project 

Request for nominations for artists and 

Selection Panel members. 

See project description , enclosed 

5:00 VII. Art Enrichment: Market St. 
Presenter: Jill Manton 

A. Master Plan: Progress Report 

See letter to project advisors , enclosed 

B. Proposed Seeding Project: Rap concert 
sponsored by Earth Drama Lab. 



ccagen5.22 Page 



. 



\ 5:15 VIII. Art Enrichment: Tenderloin Recreation 

* Center 

Presenter: Jill Manton 

Progress Report; Approval of guest curators 

5:20 IX. Gallery 

Presenter: Ann Meissner 

A. Presentation of artists being considered 
for exhibit scheduled for 8/22 - 
10/4/91. 

B. Exhibition Schedule 
Schedule enclosed 

C. Review of Policy for use and/or rental of 
Gallery 

Discussion of merits and problems of 
gallery ' s current usage gallery vs. new 
policy being considered that would allow 
rental of the gallery to groups and/or 
individuals without discrimination or 
restrictions as to the purpose of the 
reception. 

5:30 X. Policy Meeting 

Set date for Visual Arts Committee policy 
| meeting 

5:40 Adjournment 



ccagen5.22 Page 



u 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

Son Francisco. C A 94102 

(415)554-9671 



MINUTES 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
MAY 22, 1991 

The meeting was called to order at 3:20 p 



MAYOR 
Art Agnot 



Commissioners Present: 

Anne Ilea 1 y ( Char r ) 
Nancy Boas 
Bob LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa Bains 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklof 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Aley 

Stanley Elchelbaum 

Kim Fowler 

Daniel Genera 

Anne Heaty 

JohnKriken 

Robert F. LaRocca 

Amalia Mesa-fialns. Ph.D. 

Ral Y. Okamoto 

" -^la Rosekrans 



EX OFFiaO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMcArtCotectton 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Staff Present: 

Jill Man1 on 
Ton i a Macne i J 
Susan Pontious 



I . Red 

Bill Car 
Agency , 
art i s t s 
Gardens . 
Commissi 
proposal 
for the 
area. C 
the scul 
the wate 
on the t 
associat 
intimacy 
mass i ve 
In respo 
"Shaking 
that the 



evelopm 
ney , La 
present 
commi ss 
The C 
oner Bo 

in a p 
mainten 
ommiss i 
pure i n 
r featu 
echnica 
e 1 1 with 

of mos 
scale o 
use to 

Man" , 

man wo 



ent Agency: Esplanade Artists 
ndscape Architect for the Redevelopment 
ed t he preliminary proposals by the four 
ioned to produce art work at Verba Buena 
omini ss ioners were asked for their comment". 
as questioned the meaning of John Roloff's 
ublic context. She also expressed concern 
mice of Reiko Goto's work in a high traffic 
oner LaRocca reiterated his concern that 

the East Garden should be integrated into 
re in that area. In general he commented 
1 problems in each piece, especially 

leakage. He commented also on the 
t of the proposals in relation to the 
f the fountain and surrounding buildings. 
Terry Allen's proposal of a life-size 
Commissioner LaRocca expressed the hope 
uld actually shake. 



II. Minutes for 4/24/91 

Commissioner Boas moved to approve the minutes of the 
Visual Arts Committee of April 24, 1991. Commissioner 
Mesa-Bains seconded. It was so moved. 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415554-9682 



III. Consent Calendar 

Commissioner LaRocca requester) that I tern #A be removed 
from the consent calendar- and be brought up as a separate 
item. Commissioner Boas moved to approve the request and 
Commissioner Mesa-Bains seconded. It was so moved. 



VAC-MIN522. 91-twm 



Page 



B - Requi ■ t approval for Interim payment of $2,000 to 
1 tap Bongers, contingent on st\idio visit by staff, for 
continuing work on marble floor piece for the Richmond 
Police Stat i on . 

C. Request approval to extend FEMA Earthquake Contract 
with Atthowe Fine Arts Services through October, 1991. 

D. Request approval to enter into contract with Douglas 
IId] I is Tor $20,000 for consulting services during 
construct Ion period of new Sheriff's Faci] it;, and for the 
design and fabrication of interior furnishings for the 
fac Llity . 

Commissioner Boas moved approval of the consent calendar 
as revised. Commissioner Mesa-Bains seconded. It was so 
moved . 

IV. Art Enrichment: Bush Polk Garage 

Due to delays in the approval schedule, the request by 
staff in regard to payment of interim payments to artist 
Bruce Hasson was revised to read: Request for approval to 
make 2 progress payments of $7,500 each to artist Bruce 
Hasson following studio visits by Commissioner LaRocca and 
contingent upon his approval of the work as specified in 
the contract. Commissioner Boas moved to approve the 
request. Commissioner Mesa-Bains seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 

V. Art Enrichment: San Andreas Water Treatment Plant #2 
Tonia Macneil introduced artists Tim Collins and Reiko 
Goto who presented their preliminary proposal for art 
enrichment at San Andreas Water Treatment Plant. The 
artists propose to create a two part project focusing on 
images and stories about the Water Department. One part 
will consist of a camera ready document which will be 
published and distributed by the Water Department. At the 
site itself, the artists will create an "exploded book", 
installations of densely grouped photographic materials 
and movement-activated broadcasts of recorded stories, 
water sounds and other sound images relating to the past 
and present of the Department. 

The artists stated that they had verbal approval of their 
ideas from I he Water Department's liaison Steve Leonard 
and that John Mullane, the General Manager, had also been 
informed of the proposal. Commissioner Boas suggested 
that the artists work closely with an editor in the 



VAC-MI Nf>22. 91-1 wm 



Page 



production of the published document. Commissioner Healy 
Informed the artists thai the general direction of their 
proposal would be acceptable to the Committee. Staff was 
directed to contacl the Water Department GeneraJ Manage] 
to make certain thai the "exploded book" proposal met with 
li i s approva 1 . 



V] 



Ga 1 lery 



Gallery Director Anne Heissner informed the Committee of 
the sudden death of Eva Garcia, artist and staff pet-son at 
La Raz/Studio 24, who had been scheduled to 



Ga Leri a Ik 
e \ 1 1 i I ) i t in 
i nst a Llati 
commun i t v 



t lie June 

n devol ed I o I 

o r I lie e \ h i h i I 
Co mini ss i oner Mesa- Bains . 
from the exhibit, so that 

f i vo art i s ts . 



how. Jn her memory, there will be an 
I n li'i I i fe and work produced by t he 
w i I h I he gu [dance o f 
Gustavo Rivera has withdrawn 
there will now Vie a total of 



The schedule of upcoming exhibits was presented. Ms. 
Meissner noted that over the summer receptions for the 
indoor and outdoor exhibition spaces will be held 
simul taneousl y . 

Director Meissner announced that studio visits for the 
August 23rd show are now being conducted and that a 
final list will be presented at the next meeting. 

Ms. Meissner gave the Commission background information 
concerning the question of donation for use of the 
building vs. rental of the Gallery. She explained that 
"donation for use" provides limited access to groups whose 
purpose supports the mission of the gallery. A rental 
policy would make the gallery available without 
discrimination or restrictions as to the purpose of the 
reception. Examples of policies of several museums and 
similar institutions were mentioned. In response to 
Commissioner's questions, Meissner said that her research 
is being conducted at the request of Margie O'Driscoll. 

VII. Art Enrichment: Moscone Center/Esplanade Ballroom 

Artist Hung Liu presented revisions to her original 
proposal for the lobby of the Esplanade Ballroom. The 
proposal is a blow-up of the 1st map Verba Buena, also 
known as the City of San Francisco, from 1839, which would 
be created in 11 shaped canvases and paint on the "Large 
Wall". Beneath the map will be 14 exhibition cases, each 



VAC-MIN522. 91-twm 



Page - 3 



with an artifact and drawings of artifacts found in 
Ohlone burial ground found during the excavation of 
Moscone site. She noted the changes made to the ori 
design, including intensified color, expanded use o 
space, additional material providing context for th 
original map, and revised material from the Ohlone 
site. The map will now be reproduced four times ar 
the room, once in the context of the coast line of 
Francisco on the parallel wall, once as a small gol 
in a niche above the elevator and again as part of 
etching showing the growth of the city from 1839 to 

Following comments and questions by the Commissione 
Tonia Macneil suggested that the Committee consider 
introduce the proposal to the community. A discuss 
followed concerning the timing and process of commit 
involvement . The idea of a reception was discussed 
Commissioner Healy moved to approve Hung Liu's rev i 
proposal. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes 
unanimous. The artist will meet with Commissioner 
to discuss various technical issues relative to the 
display dase design. 



an 
the 
; i nal 



f 
e 

burial 
ound 
S a n 

d icon 
an 
1906. 

rs , 

how to 
i on 
nit y 

sed 

were 
LaRocca 



VI 1 1 . Collect ions : Proposal to Relocate Rodin's Throe 
Shades 

Continuing last month's discussion of the possibility of 
moving the Rodin sculpture from it's current site in 
Lincoln Park, Susan Pontious reported that her research 
had turned up no compelling reasons for maintaining The 
Three Shades at it's present location. In fact, the 
conservator's report argues strongly in favor of the move: 
the statue lias been significantly damaged from salt water 
exposure and vandalism. Steve Nash, chief curator' for 
the Legion of Honor, explained that the museum proposed To 
move the sculpture indoors to the new gallery under the 
courtyard, where it would be lit by a skylight in a very 
dramatic setting. 

Work on the proposed Museum renovation will be complete in 
1994, and The Thiee Shades would be relocated at that 
time. Funding for the move is still being sought. 

Commissioner Boas moved to approve the relocation of the 
Rodin sculpture The Three Shades to the new gallery below 
the courtyard at the Legion of Honor , contingent upon 
relocation expenses being borne by sources other- than the 



VAC-MI N52 2. 91 -twin 



Page 



A r ts C ni in i 
so inu'. -I I . 



Comm i r -- s Loner LaRoi • :a secom 



,x - ^i I Enrichment: Market Street 



Jill Mant 
Markel S1 
a I Jus l i n 
Drama Lab 
EcoJ ogy-R 
perform t 
Comnii ssio 
the Marke 
involve u 
Including 
moved app 
Rap conte 
tlie Parks 
Ba i ns sec 
Comnii ttee 
to the Ar 



Met 



ap i 
he i 



t s 

nde 

a ! 

rovi 

st I 
am 

ondi 
rer 

ts ( 



resen 

Mast. 
man !' 

SF p 
on I es 

work 
11 1.1 b 
ree t 
writ i 
ound 
1 t o 
on I i n 

Recr 
d the 
i nded 
o in ni i s 



i ed I he 
er Plan 
1 aza (Hi 
erf o rma 
t for B 

at I he 
e a c o - 
T i a us i I 
ng some 
s t a g e a 
pro v i de 

ent, up 
eat ion 

mot ion 

staff 
s i o 1 1 f ' o 



roposal for the Last of the 
"seeding" projects , to b 
ept ember 7th, 1991 . Far 

group i is organizing a 
Area you I li . The w i line i 

arkel Street site. The 
onser of this event as p 
it Program. Sponsorship 
f the cost of the progra 
publ ic ity . < 'omm Lssi one 

1 , 900 I o sponsor t he Eco 
permission to use the s 

partment. Commissioner 
It was so moved. The 
be sure that credit be 

its co-sponsorship. 



e held 
th- 
n 

s would 
Art s 
art o f 
w o u 1 d 
m , 

i Heal j 
J ogy 
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Hesa- 

g i ven 



X. Art Enrichment: Moscone Center/Howard Street 

Tonia Macneil informed the Committee that in response to 
their request, the CAO ' s project manager would be happy to 
meet with the Commissioners once a proposal had been 
identified. She said that staff had met with the CAO's 
project manager and technical manager and Germaine Kong to 
obtain answers to the candidates' budget and technical 
questions regarding the site. It was agreed that the 
proposal presentations would take place from 1 to 6 p.m. 
on June 17. Jill Manton and Tonia Macneil will 
cooordinate calendars for the many meetings scheduled that 
week and set up a meeting for the final vote on the Howard 
Street proposal. 



XI 



Collections : 



Ai rport 



Susan Pontious gave the Committee an update on the status 
of the Robert Irwin sulpture . Cost of the removal of the 
first part of the sculpture was $14,000. Removal of the 
remaining part is estimated at $20,000. Staff is working 
to be sure that the decisions and process do not 
contradict the California Art Preservation Act. If the 
work cannot be repaired or reinstalled, the City's Risk 
Manager, Keith Grand, says he believes it is justified to 
make a claim for the current market value of the piece. 



VAC-MIN522.91-twm 



Page 



The co 
t o t he 
p r o \ i 1 1 
report 
sculpt 
re info 
be suf 

sru 1 pi 

reques 

$880.0 
damage 
1 t was 

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t there is more damage 
bvious. Susan Pon1 ions 
ctural engineering 
reif orcement of the 

the proposed method of 
rtical panels would not 
uctural integrity of the 
ake. At staff's 
to approve payment of 
ervator's report on 
oner LaRocca seconded, 
pressed their thanks to 

handling of the crisis. 



XII. Ail. Enrichment: Embarcadero 



Jill Man ton presented t 

recommended for the 2nd 

Ma rk d i Suvero 

Site, Inc. 

The team of Andrew GJnzel and Kristin 



names of three finalists 
nd King Gateway site: 



Jones 



The art isfs will attend a projec 
Francisco scheduled for June 18, 
$2500 fee for their- proposals. 
to approve the selection of the 
payment of fees of $2,500 each. 
seconded. It was so moved. 



t orientation in San 

1991 and w i 1 I rece i ve 
Commissioner Ileal y move 

three finalists and the 
Commissioner Boas 



Jill reminded the Commissioners that the three finalist 
teams selected for the Promenade Project will convene in 
San Francisco June 18th for a project orientation to be 
followed by a 2 day design charette. At the conclusion 
the charette, each team will present their ideas and 
concepts to the Selection Panel, Arts Commissioners and 
the Advisory Panel. 



of 



Jill Manton presented the draft RFQ for the Muni Me! ro 
Portal and Turnabout Project. She explained that the 
artist selected will be a member- of the design team, 
working with Bechtel engineer's to Influence the form of 
the tunnel the visible interior walls and the retaining 
walls. The artist will be paid $50,000 for up to 1 J/2 
years work. A selection of proposed artists was 
presented, and staff asked the Commissioners for names of 
art isls and panelists they would recommend. 



VAC-MI N522 . 91-t.wm 



Page 



XI I I. AM Enrichment: Market Street 



Staff reported on the status of the Market Streel 
Master Plan. Jill ManLon has asked the Market Str 
Advisorj Panel to give feedback on the drafl maste 
which the team had presented. She sited the ongoj 
problems among team members and I he Lnadequai :• of 
so far, a rid asked for the Commissioner's comments. 
Commissioners Boas and Heal> recommended that staf 
terminate the relationship. Manton noted that the 
work had generated good ideas and they had been he 
des i gn work w i I h Becli tel . 



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XIV. Art Enrichment 



Tenderloin Recreation Center 



Jill Manton gave an update of the Tenderloin Recreat ion 
Center project. She said that the opportunity for 
artist's involvement on the design team has changed as the 
building is now being designed on an accelerated schedule 
in accord with the mayor's wishes. Diana Fuller and 
Robert Tobin, Director of Hospitality House, were 
recommended as guest curators. 



XV. 



New Business 



A. New Art Enrichment Projects 

There are a number of small interior renovations coining up 
which were reviewed by the Civic Design Committee, 
including a permanent homeless shelter and a Grove St. 
Aids clinic. Commissioner Healy requested staff to pursue 
possible art enrichment at those sites and suggested the 
purchase of individual artworks. 



B. 

Jill 

metho 

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by an 

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Manton 
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b y a 
or- each 
the 
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for 
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VAC-MIN522 .91-1 wm 



Page 



C. Joint Meeting of Civic Design and Visual Arts 
Committee 

It was recommended that a joint meeting be held with the 
Civic Design Committee to resolve the issues relating to 
the location of the Pioneer Monument. The Committee 
agreed to this recommenda t on . 



XVI. Adjournment 

The meeting was adjourned at 5: 10 p.m. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS: 

1. Ordered: Approval of the April 24, 1991 minutes. 
Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vote: Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Removal of Item -A from the consent 
calendar . 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote : t.'nan imous 

3. Ordered: Approval of interim payment of $2,000 to 
Jaap Bongers, contingent on studio visit by staff, for 
continuing work on marble floor piece for Richmond Police 
Station. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote : L'nan imous 

4. Ordered: Approval to extend FEMA Earthquake Contract 
with Atthowe Fine Arts Services through October, 1991. 
Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Approval to enter into contract with 
Douglas Hollis for $20,000 for consulting services during 
construction period of new Sheriff's Facility and for the 
design and fabrication of interior furnishings for the 

f acil i t y . 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vo te : Unan imous 



VAC-MIN522.91-I win Page 



o. Ordered: \pproval to pay Bruce Ilasson 2 progre: 

payments of $7,500 each, following studio visits bj 
Commissioner LaRocca and contingent upon his approval of 
the work as specified in (he contract. 
Moved : i omm i ss i one r Boas 
Vote : 1'niin i mous 

7. Ordered: Approval of revised proposal bj artisl Hung 
Liu r<w art enrichment in the Esplanade Ballroom of 
Moscone Convent ion Center, for a total design fee ''I 
$200,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vo t e : Unani mous 

8. Ordered: Approval to relocate Rodin's Sculpture, The 
Hirer Shades to the area beneath the skylight in the 
underground gallery of the expanded Palace of the Legion 
of Honor, contingent upon relocation expenses being borne 
by sources other than the Arts Commission 

Moved: Commissioneer Roas 
Vote: Unanimous 

9. Ordered: Approval to provide $4,900 to sponser 
Ecology Rap Contest in Justin Herman Plaza on September 7, 
1991 in conjunction with Earth Drama Lab as part of the 
Market Street "seeding" projects, contingent upon 
permission to use the site by the Recreation and Park 
Department . 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

10. Ordered: To approve payment of S880.00 to John Burke 
for conservator's report on damage to Robert Irwin 
sculpture at San Francisco International Airport. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

11. Ordered: To approve the selection of three 
finalists, Mark DiSuvero, Site, Inc., and the team of 
Kristin Jones and Andrew Ginzel, for the Embarcadero 
Gateway Project at 2nd and King Streets and the payment to 
each team of $2,500 plus additiorral related expenses for 
the production of maquettes. 

Moved: Commissoner Healy 
Vote; Unanimous 



VAC-MIN522. 91 -twin 



Tage 



DOUGLAS HOLLIS 2512 25th ST, SAN FRANCISCO, CA94110 (415) 826-4582 



April 19, 1991 



Susan Pontious 

Public Arts Program 

San Francisco Arts Commission 

25 Van Ness, Suite 240 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Susan: 

I spoke with Lt. Levin the other day regarding the potential for my input on 
some of the interior elements for the new Sheriffs' Facility. He had some 
interesting suggestions which I would like to pursue during the second 
phase of my contract. The areas he suggested were: 

1) The community meeting room on the ground floor (which Vicki's floor 
extends into). They need a large table and chairs for this room. This table 
(and perhaps the chairs) is something I'm interested in developing a design 
for, and fabricating as well (hopefully with a credit back from their 
existing budget for these items). In addition I want to look at the colors 
for the walls and ceiling in this room to see if they need adjustment for 
maximum ambience. 

2) The Parenting Class room will have a play area for young children. The 
floor will be "carpet-tiles" and, with no additional cost, composing a floor 
pattern with these carpet-tiles could make it a more interesting 
experience for kids and "child adults" alike. Perhaps some simple carpet 
covered seating cubes could be built as well, making a landscape for "rug- 
rats." 

In addition, my involvement with the artwork for the curtainwall ceramic 
frit and the mechanical screen will continue. In particular the issue of 
lighting at night is crucial to the final impact of the whole building, and 



we may need to put additional (beyond architectural budget) fixtures in. I 
have continued to consult with Williams & Tanaka on this issue, including 
some night tests on the 1/4 scale mockup. I think we've determined what 
is needed, but eventually a full scale section should be done to make sure. 
(The manufacturer/glazing contractor will do this if instructed by client.) 

It continues to be a terrific project and I look forward to a great 
conclusion -- and the next Tempko review! 

Call if you have quesions. 




Douglas Hollis 



City and County ot San Francisco 



Art Commission 




Memorandum 



Claire N. Isaacs 
DIRECTOR 



Date: 
To: 
From: 
Subject: 



May 15, 1991 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

TONIA MACNEIL 

STAFF REPORT FOR MAY 2 2 MEETING 




CONSENT CALENDAR 

1. Interim Payment for Bruce Hasson 

Bruce Hasson has completed fabrication of the grillwork for 
Bush-Polk Parking Garage. Commissioner Bob LaRocca and 
Tonia Macneil visited Bruce Hasson's studio on May 15 to 
review the work to insure that the work was completed as 
specified. It is therefore appropriate for the artist to 
receive the remainder of his interim payment, which is 
$15,000. 

2. Progress payment for Jaap Bongers 

Jaap Bongers is in the process of constructing the floor 
piece for the Richmond Police Station. This is a request 
for a small progress payment in advance of completion of 
fabrication, and is contingent upon a studio visit to insure 
that the work is being completed in a timely manner. 

OLD BUSINESS 

1. SAN ANDREAS WATER TREATMENT PLANT EXPANSION #2 

Tim Collins and Reiko Goto will present the outline of 
their proposal for San Andreas Water Treatment Plant. 
This is not their final proposal but is a progress 
report, to insure that they are working in a direction 
agreeable to the Committee. The final, detailed 
proposal will be presented at the June Visual Arts 
Committee meeting. The artists' concept has been 
int roduced both to the Water Department's 



(415)554-9671 



twm-agnstrep-5/15/91 Page - 1 

25 VAN NESS AVE. SUITE 240 



SAN FRANCISCO, 94102 



representative, Steve Leonard, and to the General 
Manager, John Mullane, and has their initial support. 

The initial charge by the Committee to the artists was 
to design an art work which refers to the "activities 
and processes associated with the delivery of water in 
San Francisco". The Committee also desired the project 
to have an educational function and, once the concept 
of a book was developed, urged the artists to take that 
concept beyond it's usual parameters. 

Tim and Reiko's proposal is in two parts, the first to 
create a multi-media installation, including primarily 
photography and sound, on the walls of the Water 
Treatment Plant and, incorporating much of the same 
material, to produce a camera-ready book to be 
published and distributed by the Water Department . 

STAFF RECOMMENDATION: 

NO MOTION IS NEEDED. Approve, with comments if 
necessary, the concept and format proposed by 
artists Tim Collins and Reiko Goto for art 
enrichment associated with the San Andreas Water 
Treatment Plant Expansion #2. 

2. MOSCONE CENTER/ESPLANADE BALLROOM 

Hung Liu will present her revised proposal for the Moscone 
"Large Wall " . 

BACKGROUND 

On February 4, 1991, the Arts Commission unanimously 
approved the artist's proposal for the "Large Wall", 
contingent upon approval of the revised proposal by the 
Visual Arts Committee. The artist met twice with 
Commissioner Healy to discuss the concerns raised by the 
Selection Panel and has also met with Germaine Wong and 
Ronette King . 

CONCERNS OF THE COMMITTEE 

The following are the suggestions made by the Selection 
Panel at the time of the proposal review: 

1. Explore the use and purpose and intensity of color. 

2. Involve the walls on either side. 



twm-agnstrep-5/1 5/91 Page 



3. Provide a context for the map, for instance, by framing 
the map or by bringing the shore line around to the 
walls on either side. 

1. "Contemporize" the map, somehow relating it to the 
present location and time. 

5. Check on use of Native American imagery with that 

communi ty . 

6. Continue to explore idea of recessed display elements 

on long wall and columns. 

7. Explore possibility of varying depths of canvases. 

STAFF RECOMMENDATION: 

Motion to approve the revised proposal by artist 
Hung Liu for art enrichment at the Moscone Center 
Esplanade Ballroom. 



3. MOSCONE CENTER/HOWARD STREET 

At the Committee's request, a letter was sent to John 
Cribbs, Moscone Expansion Project Manager, requesting a 
meeting with him, Oermaine Wong and the Construction 
Manager. His repLy is enclosed. 

As planned, we have been working with the artists in a two 
week "query period" to answer their questions and provide 
them with additional information as needed. The purpose of 
this period is to help candidates generate realistic designs 
and budge ts . 

On May 7, Margie O'Driscoll, Jill Manton and I met with Mr. 
Cribbs, Ray Fong , the technical manager, and Germaine Wong 
to go over the candidates' quest ions. Many areas of 
cooperation are understandably still vague. Once a proposal 
is identified, I will be able to arrange a meeting to 
negotiate a real budget and construction schedule and to 
define the extent of our ability to tie into the ongoing 
work. We learned that the deadline for completion of the 
project is early April of 1992, and that the new sidewalk 
and median will be poured in about February of that year. 
Thus there is still time to work with the contractor to 
change the surface treatments of those areas. 

I have also met with Bill Carney of the Redevelopment Agency 
to discuss cooperation with the agency and have received 
assurances that he wiil work with us to incorporate the 



twm-agnstrep-5/15/91 



Page - 3 



artists' designs into Mieir working drawings, If I he timing 
is compatible with their construction schedules. 

ST \FI RF,C< (MMFNDAT ION : 

•u MOTION IS NKKDE1). Select a member "I the 
Visual \iis Committee I" attend the meeting with 
l ),o CAO's stall once the proposals are received. 

Coordinate caJendars for t Iip June IT presentation 
,,| proposals and June 20 decision meeting for the 
Moscone Howard Street project . 



t wm- agns 1 rep- 5 / 1 5 / !M 



Page - 4 




( 'I I ICE OF 

CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



RUDOLF NOTHENBERG 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



289 CITY HALL 

SAN FRANCISCO 

CALIFORNIA 94102 

415/554-4851 



May 1, 1991 



Ms. Tonia Macneil 

Curator 

Public Art Program 

The Arts Commission 

25 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco, CA 94102 



Dear Tonia: 

In response to your April 4, 1991 letter requesting a meeting to discuss 
implementation of artists' proposals, Germaine and I both feel that the best 
time for the meeting would be after the proposals are received and reviewed. 
We would then be able to talk specific items necessary for implementation 
rather than general. 

Once the above takes place, we are receptive to a meeting at a mutually 
convenient time and place. 



yours, 



7 / 



John E. Cribbs l/ w 

Project Manager 

MOSCONE CENTER EXPANSION PROJECT 



JEC/ng: 0516 

cc: Germaine Q. Wong 
Ray Fong 




!5 Von Ness Avenue 

lute 240 

« Ft.inclsco CA 94102 

i 9671 
AX #621-3868 



DATE: 



TO: 



MEMORANDUM 



MAY 14, 1991 



AIRPORT ART STEERING COMMITTEE 

MAKGIE O'DKISCOLL, ACTING DIRECTOR, ARTS 

COMMISSION 

KATHRYN PENNYPACKER , DEPUTY CITY ATTORNEY 



1AYOR 

rl \gnos 



:OMMISSIONERS 
oibara Sklai 
resident 
oncyBoas 
k o President 

e.non Aley 
lunley Elche,lboum 
In i Fowler 
anlel Genera 
nneHoaly 
3hn Krlken 
oiHjrtF. LaRocca 
nulla Meso^alns. Ph.D. 
al Y. Okamoto 
:e Rosekrans 



I- ROM : 



RE: 



X OFFICIO 1 1EMBERS 

i. ii .tents Of the 
ne Arts Museum 
brary CorrnTilsslon, 
k.nnlng Commission, 
ecreallon cind Park 
onumtsslon 



C1ING DIRECTOR 
lurQleO'Dilscoll 



TOG RAMS 

rts Festivals 

Mc Art Collectton 

Mc Oeslgn Review 

elghborho..d Arts 

DPS Symphony Concerts 

jbllc Art Program 

reel Artlsls Ucenses 



its 430 

ale-Local Partnership 
It 554 967; 
rtHouse 
15-554 9679 



s Commission Gallery 
55 Grove, ! ,set 
15-554 9682 



susan pontious, curator 

report on structural fail 
Sculpture at sfai . 



URE UFtt.RWIN 



Description of Artwork : 

Entitled Black/Whi te Ceremonial Gates, Paci fie/Asian 
Port of Entry, this pair of morui mental sculptures by- 
Robert Irwin was commissioned in 1983 for $130,000. 
They are sited in the entry of the International 
Terminal and are visible from both the lower and upper 
levels. The work consists of a pair of aluminium and 
steel sculptures, one white and one black, 35' x 14' 
square ft., each with an onyx bolder on their base. 
These boulders fell off their base during the 1989 Loma 
Prieta earthquake and had l.o be re- i ns tal 1 ed . 

Not, i f i cat i on of Daman e : 

On Tuesday, April 29th, window-washers at SKI A 
discovered serious cracking in one of the Robert Irwin 
sculptures in the internal ional terminal at San 
Francisco International Airport. The airport's 
structural engineer 1 judged the cracking was so severe 
that the sculpture was m eminent danger of collapse. 

Prior to visiting the site myself, 1 called the artist 
and informed him o f the situat ion and told h i m that the 
due to safety concerns, the sculpture might have to be 
removed. He was agreeable to this. 

Leg al Ad v i c.e : 

Our- Deputy City Attorney, kathryn Pennypacker called to 
instruct me relative to the California Artist's Moral 
Rights Preservation Act. As the white sculpture was an 
eminent safety hazard, she instructed to authorize 
emergency removal of the white sculpture if necessary 
(even if it destroyed the work), but not. to authorize 



: 



Hi 



similar removal of the black sculpture unless it was 
also cracked . 

Site Inspection and Description of Damage : 

John Burke, the conservator from the Oakland Art Museum 
accompanied me t.o the airport to see the sculpture. 
John was recommended by Jim Bernstein (the conservator 
we had been working with out at the airport), as someone 
whose specialty was sculpture and metals. We were met by 
Leon Bitern and Don Girabaldi (legal council) from the 
SFAI . Eugene Anderson from Sheedy Crane and Rigging 
Company was also there. 

On the vertical, filigreed panel of the white sculpture, 
we observed cracks on one side that caused lateral 
separation between points in the filigree. On the other 
side of the panel, there was a crack from the filigree 
to the outside edge of the plate that went completely 
through the metal . We also observed another crack that 
had paint loss around it. 

While on the site, John Burke also noticed that the 
vertical panel of the black, companion sculpture was 
warped, and had an indentation. It was not possible to 
tell whether or not that sculpture was also cracked 
without getting up closer to the work in a lift. 

The engineering plans for the sculpture indicated that 
the plates, which fit into slots in the supporting 
columns were then bo] ted to the inside. 

Immediate Action : 

As an immediate, emergency action, Sheedy Rigging Co. 
secured the plates of both sculptures by looping a nylon 
sling attached to steel cables on either side of both 
vertical plates and securing them to the beams in the 
ceiling. (The ceiling beams were exposed due to repairs 
being made to the ceiling). The intent was to secure 
the work from being an immediate safety hazard so that 
the options for further action could be explored. 

John Burke and I discussed the status of the work, and 
agreed that there were 3 major questions to be 
considered . 

1. Could the work be repaired, and if so, could it 
be repaired in place or would it have to be 
removed and then re- installed? 



ai rpor t/ i rwi n . wps Page - 2 



2. If repaired, would the work be secure, or do 
the cracks indicate inherent vice in the 
design of the vertical plates that threatens 
the security of the piece in the future? 

3. The relative cost of any repairs. 

Initial Response from Artist : 

Upon returning to the office, I called Robert Irwin 

again 

and informed him of the situation. His recommendations 

were as follows: 

1. Cut the work up and remove it. He had never 
been happy with the installation of the work 
and felt that the Airport had little interest 
in it. Since both of the sculptures were 
intended as a pair, if the white one was 
removed he wanted the black one removed as 
well . 

2. If we wanted to repair the work and it was 
salvageable, have the fabricator, Jack Brogan, 
come up a look at it; he would know whether or 
not it was repairable to Irwin's standards. 

I told him that if we decided to destroy the sculptures, 
the City Attorney would probably want a letter from him 
authorizing that action. He said he would write a 
letter, but as he was leaving for Europe on May 3rd, we 
would have to decide before then what we wanted to do. 

Initial Engineering Report and Options for Repair : 

The next day (May 1), at the Airport's request, Dennis 
Oh, a structural engineer and President of 01mm 
Structural Design looked at the sculpture. At our 
request, he mailed a written opinion based on his 
observations. It. was his opinion that 1) the damage 
was caused by the 1989 homa Prieta earthquake and 2) 
that the sculpture could not be repaired and still 
remain structurally stable. 

On the same day, I spoke to Jack Brogan, Irwin's 
fabricator, who came up with a possible method of 
reinforcing the vertical plates in a manner acceptable 
to Robert Irwin. Brogan's suggestions needed further 



a i rporf / i rw i n . wps Page 



investigation by a structural engineer to determine 
whether or not this was a viable solution. 

Action Urged by Airport : 

In the meantime, 1 received another call from Leon 
Bitern informing me that the construction company that 
was repairing the ceiling was now charging delay costs 
because the slings securing the plates was inhibiting 
their work. Me pressed for an immediate decision of 
what the art commission intended to do relative to the 
sen 1 p tu res . 

Jason Yuen called to say that the Airport had a 1985 
Letter from Irwin authorizing the airport to destroy the 
works if they wanted. lie urged me to remove the works 
as they were a potent ial safely hazard and had never 
beem suitable for the building. 

On the morning of May 2nd, Leon Bitern called to say 
thai the story of the damaged sculptures had been 
broadcast on the 11 o'clock news and that Lou Turpen was 
extremely upset. lie wanted immediate action taken 
regarding removal of the sculptures. 

Arts Commission Response : 

I conferred with Margie U'Driscoll who was firm that no 
hasty action should be taken that would result in the 
destruction of the artwork. It was agreed that given 
the situation, the best course of action would be to 
remove the damaged vertical plates. The plates would be 
removed in such a manner that they could be re- 
installed . 

A letter authorizing this action was written to Lou 
Turpen and signed by Margie. A return letter from SFAI 
Deputy Director Dennis Bouey requested that a member of 
the Arts Commission staff or one of our consultants be 
on hand to oversee the removal . 

I called the artist and informed him of our proposed 
action, and confirmed our discussion with a letter. 

Removal of the Plates and Discovery of Additional 
Damage : 

John Burke and Scott Atthowe from Atthowe Fine Arts 
Services met at the sculpture site with Richard Battaina 
from Sheedy and Leon Bitners to discuss the removal 
procedure. Particular points of concern were 1 ) how to 



airport/ i rw in . wps Page - 4 



secure Lhe white plate during removal so that it would 
not break apart, during removal, and 2) whether or not 
the original installation holes on the top of the 
columns would have to be nil mil further in order to get 
enough leverage to be able to unbolt the plates. 

II was agreed that after Lhe removal of the plates, 
Sheedy would deliver the panels to Atthowe for- storage. 

John Burke was on hand for lhe removal of the white 
plate. lie reported that upon being able to examine the 
work up close from the lift, he discovered more breaks 
than had originally been delected. He also reported 
I luil lhe top o I' lhe columns did indeed have to be cut in 
order to unbolt lhe plates. While he was concerned with 
I'.hiSi he- said Ihal (here was no other way to unbolt the 
panels. If re-installed, these cuts would not Vie visible 
since I hey are above e.se level. 

The ne.\t evening Sheedy removed the black panel. John 
Hurke was on hand In inspect Ihal panel from lhe lift 
and reported that there were no c racks. 

Ku rt.h er Action: 

I have requested a written summary from John burke 

regarding I lies e activities and his obse t'Va I. i oris 

regarding lhe slate of lhe sculpture. 

I requested 2 additional bids from hheed.v Uigging, 1) 
for completely remov i iia the scu I pt u res so Ihal I lit? J 
could be re- i list a I I ed and 'J) removing the sen 1 pi lire in 

the luosl expedient wj , i.lil.h could result In the 
destine I. i on ol I In scu I pi u re . 

I have.- , i I so reipies I ed a written opinion from lienn i s Oh, 
lhe s I rue I. u ru I eng i nee r , rega id i ug his opinion of I he 
feasibility of tin; method Jack Itrogan suggested for 
safe I i repairing tin: sculpture. 

Margi e O' lir i sco 1 I has d i rec I ed ay a i ns I taking anj 
definil i v i- ail ion regarding the final dispensal ion of 
tin: sou I pi lire until we I oi c 1 v i I hi f o I I OW I ng : 

I) The written report from lhe Dennis Oh 

regarding the feasibilifj of I lie proposed 
repa i is 



a i rpo r I / i rw i n . wps 



y 



2) Depending on these findings, a written 

response from Iho artist regarding his 
recommended ccurse of action 

.1) Written direct ion from Kathryn Pennypacker 

C ost and Fun ding : 

The prI i ma ted cost of t 1 » * — actions taken so Far- is 
approximately $18,000, plus the cost of storage at 
At t ho we . 

In her letter to Lou Turpen, Margie requested thai 
expenses related to I ho costs of either the emergency 
actions, roinovn I or re pa i r of I he sculpture he submi t ted 
as p.-ul oT the airport's supplemental USH with KKMA . 
Dennis Uouey informed me thai if was the Airport's 
feeling that these expenses were the Arts Commission's 
responsibility. 1 discussed the matter with Keith 
Grand, I h» City's Risk Manager, and he said that the 
Arts' Commission could submit these costs as part of the 
City's insurance claim. 

it was agreed I hat as an immediate course (5 f action, the 
Airport would pay Slieedy and the Arts Commission would 
pay I lie costs of the other consultants and Atthowe. 



a l i po r I / i rv i n . wps 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

|S( o CA 94102 
(415) 5;.! 



DATE: MAY 3, 1991 

TO: VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

FROM: SUSAN PONTIOUS, CURATOR 

KE: STAFF REPORT REGARDING RELOCATION OF RODIN'S 
SCULPTURE, THE THREE SHADES 



MAYOR 
Atl Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boai 
esldenl 

Vernon Alley 

, lici,ulbaum 
Kim Fowler 

Idly 

. ken 

o'.'occa 
Ai Mesa-Bains, Ph.D. 
omoto 

. - kions 



o 



E ■ iFFICIO members 

Presidents ol ttie 
Fine Arts Museum 
1 1' irary Commission, 
Pla/ining Commission^ 
Recreation and Park 
i mmlssion 



R eview of Availa ble Documents: 

A search through Art Commission tiles and the files in 
the archives of the Recreation and Parks Department and 
the archives of the San Francisco Public Library turned 
up only three documents relevant to the issue of 
relocating The Three Similes sculpture, otherwise known 
as the Raphael We i 1 I Memorial . They are as f o 1 lows: 

1. November 28, 1!)2 1 Minutes of the Recreation 
and Hark Depf . Commission except ing the gift 
and approving the Lincoln Park site. 

2. November 7, 19ti'J memorandum to the Recreation 
and Park Commission from II. B, Connolly 
regarding his/her efforts to locate additional 
documentation on the statue (Connolly found 
none ) . 

A. July, IS)H!> conservators report prepared l>y 

Elisabeth Cormi from the fine Arts Museums of 
San Francisco and L layne Grosshard, consulting 
conservator from the Metropolitan Museum of 
Ail . 



Quire N Isaacs 



PROGRAMb 
:i . 
r ivlc Art Collection 
; i i leslgn Review 
rhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public All Program 
Slic-el Arliib Licenses 



Suite 430 

Slate Locul Partnership 

415 554 9677 

ArlHouse 

415554-9679 



Arts Comn usslon Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554 9682 



! nliorma t j on Re la f j iig to Original Site Se Lection : 

Itased on I lie Id-, real ion and Park Commission 192 1 
minutes, it would appear that there were I uo committees 
involved: the Raphael Weill Memorial Committee, which 
app 1 led to the Co mm i ss i on to erect l he statue l n one of 
the- c i t y ' s public parks, and the Advisory Committee of 
\ i lists ami \i i li I I iv I s , appointed b.\ the Hoard of Park 
Co mm i ss i one rs to se I ei: I a suitable s i I e . The later 
chose I he pa rk i ng lot in I, i nco I n Pa rk , d i t ■ec t I v east of 
the Ley ion of Honor as I he sculpture site. ( Uept of 
Parks Annual Minutes II/2H/2II 

From these ininut.es, one would conclude that there were 
no ooridi I. i ons ut t. ached K. I he gift I ha I re on i re it to 
re in tii a in its present I o< .i i ion. 



o 



Cons e r v a I ion Concerns: 

Unfortunately, in its present site, The Three Shades lias 

suffered tremendous damage due to uncontrollable 

envi romnental conditions. The Conservation Review 

conducted on The Three Shades and The Thinker in 1985 

states the folJ owing: 

Any proposed treatment must, above all, 
include I lie preservation of whatever original 
surface remains ... Rodin bronzes of the 
period .. . have unique patinations. These 
carefully applied, variegated surfaces are an 
integral pari of Lhe sculptures. Their 
complete removal, besides being aesthetically 
inadvisable, would expose the base metal to 
renewed environmental .-illack anil necoss i tale n 
chemical repatination which in no way could do 
justice to the original intent, of Lhe sculptor 
and pa I i nator . . . 

Resides repairing the ravages of Lime and 
environment , the proposed treatment must 
address itself to the effects of a harsh 
climate which is highly dangerous Lo Lhe 
surface of the sculpture. The climate has 
been detrimental Lo The Three Shades because 
of its local ion on a windy and exposed point 
near Lhe ocean. . .An ultimate conservat i on 
sol ul ion would he to relocate "The Three 
Shades" indoors, (emphasis mine) 
(K, Cor nil - Fine Arts Museum - July 1985) 

The repoi'l goes on to document the severe damage already 
done to the sculpture by the environment alone. The 
repoi'l. does not address the problems of vandal ism. 

To date, conservation costs incurred total $2,600 with 
the actual repair work being conducted in 198R. 

Staff U e com mondafi on : 

The relocation of the sculpture to inside the Legion of 
Honor may be somewhat philosophically problematical 
because it would remove the sculpture as a work of 
public art and place it into the context of a museum 
co I 1 eo t i on . However , s i von that the present location is 
in no way optimum lot public viewing, anil taking into 
consideration the serious attacks on the sculpture from 



3shades . rp I 



Page 



both vandals and the environment., 
the sculpture is advisable. 



think that re-sitinj 



Of Lhe two proposed local ions, I think that t lie needs of 
both the sculpture and the public would be best served 
by re- local i rig the sculpture underneath the skylight of 
the expanded Legion of Honor. This site would afford 
the environmental protection that the sculpture needs, 
and allow the public to enjoj I his important artwork 
displayed to its best advantage. 



-v 



3shades . rp t 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. C A 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



Date: May 8, 1991 

To: Members of the Market Street Advisory Panel 

From: Jill Manton, Director, Public Art Program 

Re: Draft of Master Plan for Your Review 



MAYOR 
ArtAgnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
Dodie Rosekrans 



3 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Drlscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



-J 



As some of you might already know, the 3 original members 
of the Market Street Design Team selected last year have 
developed philosophical and personal differences that have 
interfered with the production of the Market Street Master 
Plan. My various efforts to resolve or to mediate their 
differences have not been successful. 

In an effort to fulfill their obligation, the team 
proposed that Jun Jalbuena be hired as an editor/writer 
who could compile the team's collective notes and 
formulate the Master Plan since they could not work 
together themselves. The team asked the Arts Commission to 
extend their contract completion date and requested 
additional funding for Jun's position. This was approved. 

It soon became quite apparent to me that Jun was not in 
fact an editor, but that he was actually creating a new 
document and attitude about the document. I was receptive 
to this so long as it fulfilled the original objective of 
identifying opportunities to create various kinds of 
projects, installations, events along the street. I also 
wanted the document to contain basic parameters that 
referred to the concerns of the other departments involved 
in the maintenance and operation of the street and the 
transit system (DPW< MUNKPUC<BART ) . Much of this 
information had been discussed at meetings attended by the 
Design Team over the course of the past year. The document 
needs to fulfill varying functions. It is a map of 
opportunities, a tool for the future artists who will want 
to claim the street for a project. It tells them what 
opportunities exist and also encourages spontaneous and 
unprogrammed proposals. It tells them about the process 
and informs them about the context. It will also becaome 
an essential mechanism for fund-raising in that a 
foundation might wish to sponsor a particular opportunity 
indexed in the plan. I realize that the kinds of materials 
that are targeted for artist use may be quite distinct 
from the kinds of materials that some flinders require. 
Granted, this will not be an easy document to produce. 

After reviewing the enclosed, incomplete draft, my 
immediate reaction is that this will not become, even when 
completed, the kind I tool I need to implement the Market 
Street program. It contains some wonderful ideas and 
statements. I also like some of the categories used for 
the conveyance of information, but my impression is that 



Ls more of an artist's dialog and investigation of the 
street than a master plan. Maybe, I should make this one 
of our "seeding" projects and compensate Jun for his work, 
print it and distribute it to artists who apply for the 
Market Street projects, but I don't see it fulfilling the 
function of a Master Plan. In addition, Jun is under 
contract to the Design Team and as such, they technically 
should approve his work before it is presented to the 
Commission. Paul Kos, in general, has relegated his design 
and creative authority to Jun, so I'm certain that he 
would find no fault with this document. Andie Cochran, on 
the other hand, is not at all comfortable with this draft. 
I have not yet spoken with Topher Delaney. 

I also allow for the possibility that 8 years with the 

and County of San Francisco might have made me closed 
and blind to something truly innovative and exciting even 
when it is right before me. I hope this is not the case. 1 
am now turning to you as my advisors. Even though this 
document is only 2/3 complete, what is your impression? 
The team has asked for a $12,000 printing budget 
(obviously, this draft does not include any of the 
proposed visuals) and their fee has been increased to 
$35,000 to cover the cost of the graphic design, 
photographic reproductions, editor and seeding projects 
coordinator. Is this worth $47,000? Jun had requested 
additional time beyond the April 30th deadline. The 
Commission agreed to an absolute final extension until May 
30th. They felt that the team's year of gathering data and 
conducting research should have been of some value to Jun 
and that he did not necessarily need to begin that process 
again. In addition, the Commission is concerned about the 
loss of credibility regarding this program. It has been so 
long in the making that most people don't actually think 
that anything will happen. 

My preliminary idea is to compensate the team for the time 
and expenses incurred to date. As I mention above, Jun's 
work might be better suited as an artist's dialog about 
the street and the proposed program. I could work with my 
staff to assemble the notes and ideas of the team, which I 
have always found to be insightful and exciting, and we 
could produce the document in-house, properly crediting 
the team and its extended members for all of the creative 
input . 

Besides the immediate issue at hand regarding the format 
of the Master Plan and the future of the Commission's 
contract with the Design Team, I am also concerned that 
this be handled in a sensitive, thorough and careful 
manner. I don't want to alienate the very population of 
artists that I want to participate in the program. 



^ 



•J 



Please call me at either 554-9671 or at my home at 776- 
0704 to discuss this if you wish. I will not take any 
action or make any recommendation to either Jun Jalbuena 
or to the Arts Commission until I hear from you. 

Thank you for working with me on this. 



3 



o 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



STAFF REPORT: 
EMBARCADERO PROJECTS; MARKET -STREET 
Jill Manton 



Embarcadero Gateway Project at 2nd and King Streets 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



At the May 9th meeting of the Selection Panel for the Gateway Project, 
the panelists recommended that the following teams be selected as 
finalists and invited to develop maquettes for the project for a fee 
of $2,500 each. 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Rai Y. Okamoto 
Dodle Rosekrans 



Kristen Jones and Andrew Ginzel 
Site, Inc. 
Mark DiSuvero 

The artist teams will be asked to attend i 
San Francisco scheduled for June 18, 1991, 



OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



project orientation in 

Vote required. Staff recommendation: y 



Embarcadero Promenade Charette 

The 3 finalists teams selected for the Promenade Project will convene 

in San Francisco on June 18th for a project orientation to be followed 

by a 2 day design charette. At the conclusion of the charette, each team 

will present their ideas and concepts to the Selection Panel, Arts Commissioners, 

Advisory Panel. 

Muni Metro Portal and Turnabout Project 

I have just gotten approval from the PUC to distribute the enclosed RFQ, plus 
some minor modifications about MBE and DBE goals. I would like your 
nominations for both artist candidates and selection panelists. Some of the 
artists I would like to consider as candidates are: 



Anne Preston 
Lisa Scheer 
Brad Goldberg 
Vicki Scuri 



PROGRAMS 

Arts Festivals 

Civic Art Collection 

Civic Design Review 

Neighborhood Arts 

POPSSymphonyConcerlsJack Mackie 

Public Art Program James Phillips 

Michelle Oka Doner 



Wobo Holop 
John Roloff 
Mildred Howard 



Street Artists Licenses 



state-Local Partnership This is just a preliminary list. I have not yet given it much thought, because 

415-554-9677 the solicitation process had been on hold. It might also be an opportunity for 
painters or graphic artists, because the artists will not actually have to 
fabricate anything. They will serve as a member of the design team, influencing 

Arts Commission Gallery the form of the portal and the surface treatment of its walls. 

155 Grove Street 



ArtHouse 
415-554-9679 



415-554-9682 



Market Street Art in Transit 




Please see copy of enclosed letter for information regarding draft of 
Master Plan. I think that I may have to terminate the team's contract based 
upon the draft that I have received. I would like to convene a meeting of 
the Advisory Panel established for this project to obtain their advice and 
support regarding this serious action. 






J>/'^Yj'bM./T0^ 



MUNI METRO TURNAROUND AND I'ORTAL INTEGRATED DESIGN PROJECT 
THE SITE 

The Muni Metro Turnaround and Portal U-Wall is a 386 foot long ramp 
and retaining wall structure that rises from the underground to the 
middle of the Embarcadero at a point south of Folsom Street adjacent 
to the future site of Ri neon Point Park. Light rail trains will 
emerge from the tunnel below the level of the road to head south past 
Hills Plaza toward Seventh and King Streets. Northbound trains, 
leaving the Embarcadero wij I descend through the portal to enter the 
Market Street Metro subway. Set between the two northbound and two 
southbound lanes of roadway traffic, the portal and its walls will 
present a long, low visual element for pedestrians and motorists. 

THE PROJECT 

An artist will be commissioned to work with I lie project design team 
to design the visible aspects of the portal and li-wall structure, 
including the form of the retaining walls and the tunnel portal and 
all surface definition and texture. The task of the artist will be to 
create a design of this structure that will make the it a graceful, 
memorable and dynamic feature of the waterfront. 

GOALS 

An artist, working in collaboration with design architects and 
engineers, will develop an integral design for the structure that 
will: 

-Create a sense of transparency for the structure 

-Create a portal and U-wall structure that will flow into the 
earth gracefully 

-Establish the structure as an appropriate counterpoint to the 
Rincon Point Park 

-Establish an aesthetic relationship with the overall waterfront 
urban design 

-Respond to pedestrian, motorist and transit rider sightlines 
and speeds of passage in developing the design concept 

PROJECT RESPONSIBILITIES 

The artist will collaborate with the design team in all phases of the 
project including: 

-Complete concept development of the portal and U-Wall design 

-Design of all visible surface elements including the form and 
texture of the structure 

-Development of working drawings and project specifications for 
incorporation into construction documents 

-Supervisory and inspection support services for the 
implementation of the design during construction 



P ROJECT GUIDKI.TNRS 

-The art work will be integral Lo the portal design and 
construct i on . 

-The art work must not compromise the functional design and 
Structural integrity of the portal and U-Wall structure. 

-The art work design must be completed in accordance with the 
engineering design and construction schedules established by the 
Public Utilities Commission for the project. 

-The art work must not exceed the design and construction 
budgets established by the PUC for this element of the project. 

BUDGET 

$50,000 Design Fee for Artist 

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

All artist applications must include the following: 

-A typed letter of interest indicating previous public art 
experience and how it might be applicable to this project. Describe 
the approach that you envision for this project and how you think it 
might be executed. (2 pages maximum) 

-Current resume with emphasis on public art experience and 
recent public commissions. 

-Up to 20 slides of recent projects you have produced or 
participated in. Please label each slide with your name and a number- 
Include a slide index that corresponds to the number of each slide. 
Indicate title, medium, dimensions, date and location as well as the 
project budget and commissioning agency if applicable. 

-A sel f -addressed stamped envelope for the return of your' 
materials. The San Francisco Arts Commission can not be responsible 
for he loss or damage of application materials. 

SELECTION PROCESS 

Eligibility: This competition is open to all professional artists. 
Women and multi-cultural artists are encouraged to 
part ic ipate . 

Process: A Select ion Panel has been established for this project 
whose members have expertise in public art and urban design. The 
Panel will be advised by non-voting representatives from the various 
City departments involved with the Waterfront Transportation 
Projects . 

A selection of artists' materials will be presented to the panel for 
review. The panel will decided upon a limited number of finalists to 
be interviewed based upon a review of the artist's work and the 
strength of the preliminary concept. At the conclusion of the 
interviews, one artist will be selected to join the design team for 
the Muni Metro Porta] Project. 

All applications should be submitted to the Arts Commission no later 
than February 15, 1991. 



Please send mal eriaJ s to: 



Jill Maul on 

San Krnncisco Arts Commission 

'I T> Van Ness Avenue #210 

San Francisco, CA 9 1102 



» ^ 



3 



J 



PROPOSAL FOR LAST "SEEDING" PROJECT FOR MARKET STREET BEFORE MASTER PLAN PROJECTS 
BEGIN: 

Larth Drama Lab, a SF- based performance organization is sponsoring an 
Ecology-Rap contest which will cul'inate in the creation of an original 
Rap based upon an awareness of the pervasive threat to the environment 
that we face daily as part of our urban existance. Earth Drama Lab would 
like to have the winners of this Ecology-Rap Contest perform their work 
on September 7th in Justin Herman Plaza. The enclosed material describes the 
overall project, of which this performance would be the final component. 
Hie project focuuses on the involvement of youth from San Francisco, East 
Palo Alto, Oakland, San Jose and Richmond. 

we are being asked to sponsor or co-sponsor this last event/performance as 
part of the Market Street Transit Art Program. This will involve underwriting 
the cost of a sound stage, publicity, etc. Earth Drama Lab has not yet given me 
a cost estimate. 

Since the Market Street Master Plan projects will probably not occur until 
late fall, if indeed we are able to print, distribute and announce the first 
series of art projects by August or September, this last event will allow the 
program to have some sort of ongoing visibility and presence throughout the summer 
along with the other "seeding" events envisioned. My recommendation is that 
we agree to co-sponsor this, provided that the budget submitted and program 
format meets with your eventual approval. 



The Ecology-Rap Contest 



The Eco-Rap Contest is one facet of Earth Drama Lab (EDL) 
which will be presenting an arts festival to be held from May 10 to June 10, and 
will showcase comedy, drama, dance, and film screenings that have the 
environment as a principal focus. The entire festival will take place at four 
venues in San Francisco: Life On The Water Theatre, Climate Theatre, Theatre 
Artaud, and the Castro Theater. 

Earth Drama Lab is a project of Life On The Water Theater, a 250 
seat nonprofit theater located in Fort Mason. Life On The Water, created in 1986 
by Leonard Pitt, Ellen Sebastian, Joe Lambert, and Bill Talen, and stages 
experimental and multi-cultural performance. 

Earth Drama Lab grew out of a response to the artistic 
community's increasing concern about the world's ecological health. Its purpose 
is to collaborate with the environmental community in order to effect the larger 
community, and is made up of an advisory council of artists and 
environmentalists. 

Eco-Rap Contest 

The premise is that each group of finalists create an original Rap 
based on an awareness of the pervasive threat to the environment we face in 
our daily lives. The contest developed out of a concern that today's 
environmental movement is made up largely of white, middle class participants 
and has not yet established a strong enough connection to the ethnic urban 
population who receive the brunt of urban pollution. The Eco-Rap Contest is an 
effort to provide a forum to the Rap and Hip Hop community to express their 
concerns and frustrations about their experiences with hazardous environmental 
policies, while offering them promotion as artists. 

How The Contest Works 

Five contest sites - local churches or community centers - will be chosen 
around the Bay Area. These include: San Francisco, East Palo Alto, San Jose, 
Oakland, and Richmond. Any rapper who wishes to participate in the contest 
will submit a cassette tape of an original rap to the Eco-Rap Contest. A panel of 
judges will select a maximum of 24 acts to appear at each site for the first 
round of competition. 



# 



• First stage of the competition - July 27, 28. August 3. 
The 24 contestants will appear at their site and perform an original 

rap. A panel of judges - local DJ's, producers, and rap artists - will 
select 3 acts to go on to the next stage of the contest. 

• Second stage of the competition - August 17. 
The 3 acts chosen from each site will meet at Life On The Water 

Theatre at Fort Mason in San Francisco. The 15 acts will be asked to 
perform an original rap before a panel of 5 judges who will select a 
total of 7 acts. All 7 acts will be awarded first prize. The 8 
remaining finalists will be awarded second prizes. 

• Neighborhood tour - August 24. 
The 7 first prize winners will spend an afternoon touring their 

neighborhood with a local environmentalist (someone who is trained 
in the dangers of urban pollution) Together they will explore the 
rappers personal experiences with health hazards in their community 

• Eco Rap Concert - September 7. 
The 7 award winners will be asked to write an environmental rap 

based on the issues most important to them. They will then be invited 
to take part in a live rap concert to be held in San Francisco. Each group 
will perform their original environmental rap plus a second rap of their 
choice. The concert finale will have all 7 acts performing a group 
environmental rap in the spirit of. We Are The World, which they will 
write together. 

7 rirSt FriZ6S - receive a chance to showcase their work in the Eco- 
Rap concert, plus $200 cash, 10 hours in a recording studio to make a demo 
tape, plus other items from Bay Area merchants. 

8 Second Prizes - $200 in gift certificates for records, tapes and CDs. 
plus a variety of other items from Bay area merchants 

We have begun to contact role models from the Rap and Hip-Hop 
communities, and minority people in the environmental movement, who will be 
visible as consultants, advisors and judges This includes: 

• Carl Anthony - Pres. Earth Island Institute, co-founder Urban Habitat program. 

• Victor Lewis - Environmental activist, founder Environmentalists Against 

Racism. 

• Davy D. - DJ. KPFA, KPOO radio. 

• Ricky Vincent - DJ, KALX radio. 

• Marcos Guitterez - DJ, KSOL radio. 

• Kelley Armstrong - KKSF radio. 

• Cuthroat - DJ: Town's End, DNA and DV8. 

• Jimmy Dright, a.k.a. Chopmaster J. - Digital Underground. 



•Sadiki Nia - local rap artist management, journalist, and community activist. 

• Hyde St. Studios - recording studio. 

• Different Fur - recording studio. 

• Earwax Productions - recording studio. 

Among the environmental groups and organizations who are 
sponsoring the Eco-Rap: 

Threshold Foundation 
Zellerbach Family Fund 
Urban Habitat 
The Trust For Public Land 
West County Toxics Coalition 

Eco-Rap Producers 

• Leonard Pitt - Executive producer. Leonard is a theater artist and has been 

performing for 30 years. He has toured internationally and is co-founder 
of Life On The Water Theatre. 

• Piero El Malo - Associate Producer. Founder and lead singer of the Freaky 

Executives, and Bammie winner. Piero has worked extensively with 
Hip-Hop groups in the Bay Area. 



^ 



- J 




• • 



inorities 
bear brunt 
of pollution 



; Latinos and blacks living in 
State's 'dirtiest' neighborhood 



fly Jane Kay 

FtfAMtlER ENVTBONMEKTAl WWTEH 



CALIFORNIA'S MOST toxic neighborhood 
lies wedged between the state's largest black 
and Latino communities. 
The 1 -square-mile section of Los Angeles 
County — ZIP Code 90058 — is dotted with waste 
dumps, freeways, smokestacks and waste-water pipes 
from polluting industries. Here 18 companies in 1989 
discharged 33 million pounds of waste ■ 
i chemicals in the environment, five times 
the amount in the next-worst ZIP Code in 
Orange County. 

" Environmentalists say it's no accident 
: that ZIP Code 90058, where the popula- 
. tion is 59 percent black and 38 percent 
~:Hispanic, is the state's "dirtiest." It's just - 
one example, they say, of a newly recognized form of 
discrimination: toxic racism. 

")"We've got no drug rehabilitation centers, no treat- 
ment center, no jobs, no programs to upgrade the 
falling population between 35 and 40 years old," said 

-. - [See TOXIC, A- 12] 



EXAMINER 
SPECIAL 

REPORT 

♦ 

Pari I 



LA.'s back yard 
filled with toxics 

resident Juanha Tat* "But WAV* ' 
got toxic industries aud 76. percent 
of the prison* here In South Cen- 
tral." 

From Richmond to Sao Diego 
lo the Sao Joaquin Valley to com 
munitiea across the nation, the 
pattern ia dear. Minoritiea bear the 
brunt of toxic pollution. 

The nation's largest toxic-waste 
dumpa and incinerators operate 
near their homes in cities and in 
rural areas. They have the dirtiest 
jobs. Their children are exposed 
every day to pesticides, lead, asbes- 
tos, PCBs, chemical emissions and 
hazardous waste. t ( M?',- ,.- 

Nobody wants toxic waste, 
Even small amounts of* chemicals 
— scientists still debate how much 
t can cause retardation, cancer, or 
nerve and respiratory damage. 

But as the nation's need to put 
the waste somewhere grows, more 
Ll-S. corporations are moving into 
impoverished communities where 
people's need for jobs surpasses 
concern for a clean environment. 

•These places are ideal because 
of their poweriessness and their 
lack of education and vulnerabili- 
ty," said Robert Bullard, a UC- Riv- 
erside professor and leading expert 
on environmental racism. 
'l "It's £he path of least resistance 
whether it's a municipal landfill, an 
incinerator, a toxic-waste dump or 
a rh+miral plant It's exploiting the 
faars of communities that have a 
high unemployment rata. Any job 
is better than no job." 
' Indeed, the hire of a paycheck 
has prompted some minority com- 
muiiiut*, including poverty •strick- 
en native Americans, to welcome 
waste companies. 

■ Generally, industry save such 
projects enhance s community's 
economic and social circum- 
stances. Bechtel Enterprises of- 
fered s full range — garbage, coge- 
neration, trash furnaces and by- 
dropower facilities — last year to 
the Qglals Sioux on the Pine Ridge 
Reservation in South Dakota. 

A lawyer representing Bechtel 
of San Francisco said the enter- 
prises would be "commercially le 

sound. 

Chemical Waste Management 
Inc. the nation's largest hazardous 
waste disposal company, and 
Waste Tech Services, which has 
sought projects on native Ameri- 
can land in Alaska, Oklahoma and 
New Mexico, say they ttonH pick 
sites for social reasons. 

"Well attempt to tils wherever 
there Is community. support for a 
project whether tt be orUrAbal land 
or private land,** said Dod« John- 
son of Waste Tech in Golden, Colo. 

Still, evidence is plentiful of dis- 
proportionste — and unhealthy — 
pockets of pollution In minority 
communities. 1*1*/ 

. : % * . : I $ 




twsn/1 
Wsmbers of the West County 
Toxics Coalition, a Richmond 
group fighting polluters, r 

demonst rale in front of Chevron '$ , 
plant in Richmond. '•. - ; 



TOXIC RACISM 

Sunday — Minorities bear the v 
brunt of toxic pollution » 

Monday — Farm workers fight pe£ 
ticides and poverty I 

Tuesday — Urban black, Hispanic 
communities hit hard * 

Wednesday — Native Americans • 
at odds over accepting industry • 



0V 



1 



CALIFORNIA'S dirtiest ZIP 
Code, 90058, was discovered 
during Examiner research 
of the federal Community Right to 
Know Act, which requires the larg- 
est manufacturers to report a por- 
tion of toxic discharges. 

The area' and surrounding mi- 
nority communities of South Cen- 
tral and East Los Angeles, Watt*, 
ComptoD, Huntington Park and 
Bell Gardens, have more than their 
share cf the state's chemical emit- 
ters, the data show. 

Some residents are saying 
they've had enough. 

In 1985, when a company tried 
to build one of the country's 14 
toxic-waste incinerators in the 
neighborhood, residents rebelled. 

The move was defeated by Jua- 
nita Tate's group, Concerned Citi- 
zens of South Central, one of the 
nation's first African American en- 
vironmental groups. 

' Another company then tried to 
construct it a few miles away in 
ZIP Code 90068, in Vernon, next to 
the biggest barrio in the United 
States. In an unusual alliance of 
black and Latino communities, 
Concerned Citizens went to the 
Mothers of East LA., an activist 
group bom in a Catholic church, 
and sued the government. A month 
ago. they won. 

"It was the first time the Afri- 
can American and the Spanish 
communities came together on a 
common interest," Tate said. "We 
think they dump on minority com- 
munities because they feel no one's 
out there." 

► In Richmond. bUck and Lati- 
no neighborhoods have sprung up 
around the city's petrochemical 
and chemical companies 

It mokes no difference if the 
industry or the communities came 
first, said Henry Clark, director of 
the West County Toxics Coalition, 
an activist group. "No planning 
agency should allow the communi- 
ty to come up so close. 

"It ultimately comes down to 
power. Are the corporations going 
to rip off the community and use it 
as a dumping ground? Or are the 
people who live there able to exer- 
cise their self-determination and 
hold the industries accountable?" 

► San Francisco's only Super- 
fund site — the nation's most pol- 
luted sites — is the former Hunters 
Point Naval Shipyard, next to the 
Bay view/Hunters Point black 
community. 

► In San Diego County, the 
largest amount of hazardous waslo 
is produced in Barrio Logan, which 
is 99 percenl Latino. ' 

► Chicago's South Side, which 
is predominantly African Ameri- 
can and Hispanic, has the greatest 
concentration of hazardous waste 
sites in the nation. 

► Six of Houston's eight city 
incinerators and ail five of to land- 
fills are located in predominantly 
African American neighborhoods. 



♦ IVXICfromA 1 



LA's back yard 
filled with toxics 



EIGHTY TO 90 percent of 
California's 300.000 farm 
workers are minorities. 
Most are Hispanics of Mexican or- 
igin with Americap blacks the next 
largest group. _ \ -/:* 

Every day in the' fields, workers 
are exposed to pesticides routinely 
applied to the crops. They work 
largely unprotected, and carry 
home chemical residue on their 
clothes, their hands and their tools. 
They eat sprayed food directly 
from the fields and drink water 
containing pesticide runoff. They 
have no protections under the fed- 
eral Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration. 

While pesticide use is not iUegnJL 
only two of 600 agricultural chemi- 
cals have passed California's full 
battery of tests to determine 
whether they cause cancer, birth 
defects, nerve damage or other 
chronic diseases. More than a doz- 
en widely used pesticides are 
known to cause cancer in lab ani- 
mals. 

The state counts about 900 agri- 
culture pesticide-related illnesses a 
year, and the number is unrealisti- 
cally low, officials admit 

In Earlimaxt, 250 miles south of 
San Francisco, 13-year-old Monica 
Tovar died recently of leukemia, 
reviving worries over whether poi- 
son in the fields is endangering 
farm workers' children. 

Nearby, Chemical Waste is try- 
ing to locate a toxic-waste incinera- 
tor in the 95 percent Latino town 
of Kettleman City. 

ON NATIVE American 
lands in California, 12 
tribes are under economic 
pressure to pick a development' 
project, most of them associated 
with toxic waste. Nationwide, cor- 
porations and the government are 
negotiating with 35 native Ameri- 
can tribes regarding hazardous 
waste landfills, toxic incinerators, 
mines or other development 

More than 2 million tons of ra- 
dioactive uranium mill wante have 
already been dumped on nnlivo^ 
American lands, and many clowd 
mines and other nuclear facilities 
are on or near reservations. 

State rnvininmentul lows don't, 
apply to Indian lands, and the U.S.. 
Environmental Protection Agency. 
admits its laws are weaker than 
many states' laws and that it can't 
oversee all projects. 

"From a regulation standpoint, 
there is renlly no advantage to be- 
ing on an Indian reservation be- 
cause we've agreed u> meet nil the 
state environmental regulations if 
they're more Plringcnt than the 
federnl," said Johnson, Woslq 
Tech's spokesman, 

On the Mexican border, the 
tribal governments of the Cnnum 
ond \j\ Po8la Indian reservations 
have agreed to n mull imillion dol- 
lar garbage dump and a hazardous 
waste incinerator. 



"I know what jobs we're going to 
get," said Lance Hughes, n Chero- 
kee who directs native Americans 
for a Clean Environment in Table- 
quah, Okla. "If anyone suffer h, itlj 
be the Indian people because it's 
the low-level jobs thnl are the first 
contact — unloading (rucks, dig 
ging ditches, handling waste wa- 
ters. We're not going to be in the 
control rooms pushing buttons " 

THE PATTEKN emerging 
throughout the country 
confirms 1987 findings bj 
the United Church of Christ^ 
Commission on Racial Justice. \ty 
study was prompted by a I98J1 
General Accounting Office rep*>r1 
that found a strong correlation I* 
tween socioeconomic! and ivnstr 
dumps. 

Among its finding' 

► The percenl of minorilit s wit 
(wire as high in communities wifji 
a toxic -waste facility Hum in llw-j) 
without one. 

► Forty percent of the nation^ 
estimated hazardous waste landfill 
capacity is in three nitcs in pre 
d&minantly black communities in 
Alabama, Louisiana and Koutf> 
Carolina. One of those — Simiujr 
County, Ala. — is home to thr 
nation's largest U.S. toxic-wnsti 
dump. 

Charles Lee. author of lrn- 
study, said last month from Allan 
la: "As long as there pre commum 
ties to put these things in, IhereV 
no incentive to change chemiuil 
dumping practices and no power U> 
influence decision making." 

Four years late*, litlle ha- 
changed. 

"Poor and minority communi- 
ties, in general, are more likely I" 
be located near indup I nnl arras nn'd 
near freeways," said Dr. Lynii 
Goldman of the staU Department 
of Health Services. 

'They're less likely to have safe 
places for children to play, mofe 
likely to inhabit older housing with 
deteriorating lead paint, and more 
likely to work in more hazardous 
occupational settings." 

Still, African American childr^i 
have a higher rate of low-birth 
weight and infant mortality thari 
whites. And minority children, es- 
pecially blacks,' have higher blootl 
lead levels compared with whuV 
children in the same neighbor- 
hoods and social class, Goldmaji 
said. - f. x 

The government has been slow 
to respond to growing evidence 
that minorities bear a dispropor- 
tionate burden of toxic dangers. * 
Three years ago. Congress or- 
dered the US. Agency for ToxJc 
Substances Disease Registry ty 
conduct nearly 1,000 health assess- 
ments in communities harboring 
Superfund sites. Additionally, the 
agency was to pinpoint threatened 
minority communities; H has yet tn 
do so. 



Minorities lack the clout fj> 
complain about poor working cofJ 
ditions and governromt inactiop. 
said Michele Gon7alez Arroyo m 
the federal I>abor Occupational 
Safety Program. ' 

If they've come from Mexico, 
where there is 50 percent unem- 
ployment, "They're concerned?' 
she said. "But the bigger concern is 
'How can I eat frnm one day U> tb> | 




»T ROGERS 

Members of th« West County 
Toxics Coalition, a Riclunond 
group fighting polluters, 
demonstrate in front of Chevron's 
plant in Richmond 



THE CHEMICAL BARRIO 




San Diego McUl worker Rachel Ortiz itandt near a contaminated dump lite in her Barrio Logan neighborhood. 



Ethnic enclaves rebel 
against toxic waste 



Residents angry, 
push for cleanup 

By Jane Kay 

EXA»*€H BWIO*gWT*L WHITER 

BARRlO LOGAN, San Diego 
County — The barrio, the 
fast-beating corazon of the 
Sail Diego Chicano community, is 
a haven for the biggest toxic-wast* , 
generators in the county. 

In Richmond — the Bay AreaV 
most heavily industrialized area — 
dozens of pesti- 
cide, fertilizer and 
other chemical 
companies are 
next to lower-in- 
come black and 
Hispanic neigh- 
borhoods. 

It's no coinci- 
dence, environ- 
mentalist* say, that the largest mi- 




Pari3 



nority communities have more 
than their share of toxic pollution. 
Richmond and Barrio Logan are 
two examples, they say, of toxic 
Tacism. 

Now both communities are re- 
belling, organizing against the dis- 
proportionate burden. 

In Barrio Logan, which lies be- 
neath hydrocarbon-belching High- 
way 6, social worker Rachel Ortiz 
directs the Barrio Youth Station, a 
service center in the 99 percent 
Latino community. 

Ortiz cried "enough is enough" 
last year to a large chemical recycl- 
ing plant across the alley from the 
center. After a tough public hear- 
ing, Pacific Treatment agreed to 
move its 12 million poundB a year 
of recycled chemicals. 

The old barrio, home to genera- 
tions of Latinos, is part of South- 
east San Diego, a larger mixed mi- 
nority sprawl crisscrossed with 
freeways and historic sites. The 
streets teem with parents pushing 
. I baby strollers and landmark res- 
I taurants' like Clme^a. 



In Chicano Park, murals are 
emblazoned with slogans: "Varrio, 
Si — Yonkes, No" (Barrio, Yes — 
Junkyards, No) and "Mas Casas — 
Menos Yonkes" (More Homes — ( 
Fewer Junkyards). 

At its worst, there were "23 ma- 
jor junkyards in Barrio Logan, al- 
most one every block," Ortiz said. 

"All of our properties were 
drenched with oils and battery ac- 
ids. They leaked out after rains, 
and dogs would die. Sidewalks 
turned black and corroded." 

A lot of the junk is gone now. 
But every year 127 companies in 
Barrio Logan produce 63 million 
pounds of chemical waste — one 
third of all chemical waste generat- 
ed in the county, according to a 
community group's research of fed- 
eral, state and local records. 

Nearly 100 companies in the 
five-square miles keep hazardous 
materials on site. And wedged be- 
tween houses are a chemical supply 
house, a plater with tanks of cya- 

:[ See TOXIC, A-8) 



Poor areas have 
toxic neighbors 

nide, a toxic gas company and a 
San Diego Gas and Electric Co. 
power station. 

The proximity of exposed tanks, 
welding, painting and i an dhlssti n g 
bothers Jose Pacheco, 68, a mem- 
ber of the Catholic church's San 
Diego Organizing Project, 

"Children are breathing all this 
stuff. They should take the houses 
out, or they should take the facto- 
ries out They shouldn't be togeth- 



IN THE MINORITY communi- 
ties of Richmond, a city of 
80.000, one out of five families 
lives in poverty. In 14 neighbor- 
hoods closest to heavy industry, 
black residents make up 72 percent 
to 94 percent of the population. 

Minority neighborhood activ- 
ists, angered by the chemicals over 
North Richmond, in 1986 formed 
the West County Toxics Coalition. 
"We had a toxic cloud coming to 
us and the jobs going somewhere 
else. People wanted to be protec- 
ted," said Henry Clark, director of 
the coalition. 

It uses as ammunition a 1989 
report by Citizens for a Better En- 
vironment entitled "Richmond at 
Risk." The report — based on 
wastewater, air, hazardous waste 
and federal Community Right to 
Know reporting — shows that 350 
companies produce hazardous 
waste in the greater Richmond ar- 
ea and shows a link between race 
and waste. 

Industry has dominated the ar- 
ea since 1902, when Standard Oil 
Co. built the first oil refinery. 
There are now hundreds of manu- 
facturing companies employing 
thousands, many of whom live 
nearby. 

But, said Clark, "It doesn't 
make any difference who was here 
first, us or industry. It just showed 
us it was the county's fault for not 
having a buffer zone." 

1.7 million pounds of chemicals 

In 1989, nearly 100 large Rich- 
mond manufacturing companies 
reported 1.7 million pounds of 
chemical discharge to air, water, 
land and hauled off-site, according 
to Community Right to Know re- 
ports. 

Debate continues over the risk 
from toxic discharges, and Envi- 
ronmental Protection Agency 
studies show industrial exposures 
to neighborhoods are relatively low 
compared to exposures they get in- 
side houses and cars. Other studies 
show models of higher chemical 
concentrations outside plants. 

At a recent conference, Dr. 
Wenjlel Brunner, dujxtor of the 



Contra Costa Health Department, 
cautioned that environmental 
causes are difficult to prove. 

There'd have to be an eco-di- 
saster to find an environmental 
problem," ha said. "We know these 
things aren't good for you. You 
don't have to be a rocket scientist 
to know they havs to bs cleaned 
up." 

Residents conducted their own 
unscientific study by knocking on 
doors In Parchester Village and 
other neighborhoods closest to tac- 
toriet and Incinerators. They 
found people who reported cancer, 
respiratory problems and skin 
rashes, Clark said. 

Lucills Allen, a teacher who 



joined the coalition two years ago, 
said people at every other house 
reported breathing difficulties. 

The Bay Area Air Quality Man- 
agement District samples twice a 
month for about a dozen toxic con- 
taminants In central Richmond. 
"We dont see higher concentra- 
tions than we see any place else," 
said toxkologist Pat Holmes. 

However, there are no perma- 
nent air monitors in North Rich- 
mond near two dozen chemical 
plants or hundreds of others. 



No toxic sir standards 

Nor do the state or federal gov- 
ernments have toxic air standards 
for the poisonous organic dU- 



EEESESffiSZa] tESSE 



__ i^ii 



i];uiii--3 




i 10 cities for 



HBMMMHi flMratlOfl 

In millions of pounds 

1. Bsrrto Logan: 83 

2. Chuls Vista: 38 

3. National City: 28 

4. Downtown: IS 

5. TlerrB Santa/Sierra Mesa: 10 
8. Mlra Mesa/Sorrento Valley: • 

7. Linda Vista: 7 

8. Oosanslde: • 
8. Spring Valley: 8 

10. u Jolla/Pacmc Beech: ■ 



Toxk IquM and toOd 
chemical storage 

in millions of pounds 

1. Downtown: 183 

2. Chule Vista: 89 

3. Bsrrto Logan: 83 

4. La Jolla: 43 

3. Linda Vista: 33 
8. National City 13 

7. EscondkJo: 12 

8. Hems Santa/Sierra Mesa: 11 
8. Mlra Mesa/Somjnto Valley U 
10, Cajor: 10 



Ethnic breakdown 

Sm Maf8 Caatrtr BarrteLefai 




Other 0.2% 
Native Amer 4 .t% ■ 




charges that are measured In tons 
at the stacks by the companies and 
measured in tumors in lab anima l s 
by the scientists. 

The citizens' gTOup last year 
tried to get "Good Neighbor Agree- 
ments," or deadlines for improve- 
ments, with the companies, includ- 
ing Chevron Corp.. the largest Cal- 
ifornia company, which has five 
plants and two chemical research 
facilities in Richmond. 

The company has started talks 
with the coalition. 

Chevron, which grew from the 
original Standard Oil in the early 
1900s, says it wants to be a good 
neighbor in Richmond 

"I think these discussions are 
beneficial." Jeff Krag, a spokesman 
for the refinery. "It gives us a per- 
spective that we don't have." 

Reductions in chemicals are 
coming from long-term company 
policy and "Bimple good business," 
Krag said, and not necessarily as a 
direct result of neighborhood re- 
quests. 

Chevron replaced liquefied, 
pressurized chlorine for cooling 
water treatment, as a precaution 
against Bhopal-type accidents. 

"We don't believe there is any 
health risk to our neighbors as a 
result of our operstions," Krag 
said. Under Proposition 65 report- 
ing requireme.its, the refinery h/j 
found no discharges to the commu- 
nity 60 far that require a warning. 



THE NEIGHBORHOOD in 
Barrio Logan changed with 
the construction of the free- 
way system in the 1950s. The com- 
munity was cut in two, recalls Ma- 
ria RiveroU, whose parents lived 
there when they moved from Mexi- 
co. "You couldn't even walk to 
church." 

Industry began buying up cheap 
land. The city and county looked 
the other way as companies put up 
concertina wire, stacks of flattened 
cars and chemical-rich operations. 
The community, glad to have 
low rent, didn't complain. "We 
didn't have enough education," Pa- 
checo said. And Ortiz added: 
"They know we don't respond to 
public hearing notices. We weren't 
used to dealing with white-man 
policy." 

A San Diego group, the Envi- 
ronmental Health Coalition, re- 
cently provided the documentation 
of Barrio Logan's suspicions: the 
county's minority neighborhoods 
have the largest concentrations of 
toxic materials and hazardous 
waste. 

Buffer between Industry, borne* 

In the works is a proposed pio- 
neer zoning ordinance, part of a 
'Toxics Free Neighborhood" cam- 
paign. It would n^end current zon- 



TOXICS IN THE CITY OF. RICHMONMfcsw^ 




Native American: 0.5% 
Total population: 87,42! 

SOURCES: 1990 Csrmjt, CtBnra tor ■ Bl 



Trial population: 5,581 



ing laws to create a buffer btween 
industry and sensitive popultions 
— parks, houses, schools. Vithin 
five years, companies wouldhave 
to cut chemicals, pollutioiand 
noise or move out. Newones 
couldn't move in. 

And a new growth-contnl San 
Diego City Council has explssed 
support for it Yet the sympsjietjc 
majority is threatened as ikey 
member teeters on being ousid in 
a recall election. 

Richmond is trying to soh its 
pollution by encouraging cojpa- 
nies to modernize, voluntaritre- 
duce chemical use and cut the ad 
to Chevron's toxic waste incin-a- 
tor. 

"We're not going to allow tin 
to get away with disrespecting pv. 
pie and blowing toxic smoke , 
their face," Clark said. "We cat 
just move away. We've got roo 
here." \ 



EXAMINER GRAPHICS 

Balio Logan's Ortiz says urban 
blight affects children's behavior. 
"If yo< want to take away violence, 
you t*e away this ugly deteriora- 
tion around them," she said. 

Ndv that action is being taken, 
"the yds' behavior is 600 times 
bettef. You've got to take care of 
livinf conditions or the social prob- 
lemsare never going to go away." 



MIC 



Sunder — Minorities bear the 
bruntbf toxic pollution 
MondQr — Farm workers fight pes- 
ticide and poverty 
• Tuedjy _ Urban black. His- 
panic lommunities hit hard 
Wedmsdiy — Native AmeSS,^, 
at odd over accepting indu"55j-^ 




SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

I 55 Grove Street. San Francisco, California 94 1 02 (415) 554-9682 

May 8, 19 91 

Program Schedule 
Gallery Exhibits 

1. Juana Alicia/Garcia/Loarca/Sapien/Sol.i nas 

June 28 - August 9/ Reception: June 27, 5-7:00pm 

2 - Concurrent Solo Exhibits. Artists to be announced. 

August 23 - October 4/ Reception: August 22, 5-7 :00pm 

3. "Faster, Faster: Kill, Kill" 
Curated by Tony I.abat 

October 18 - November 27/ Reception: October 17, 5-7 :00pm 

4. "Chain Reaction 7" 

December 17 - February 1/ Reception: December 19, 5-7 :00pm 

5. "Real Tears" 

February 15 - March 29, 1991/ Reception: February 14, 5-7 :00pm 
Glen Helfand, Curator 

Exploration: City Si te 

1 . "Sal Terrae" by Mie PrecKler 

June 28 - Sept. 27, 1991/ Reception: June 27, 5-7: 00pm 

2. Work by Charles Gute 

October 18 - December 18/ Reception: October 17 , 5-7 :00pm 

3. "The Archaeology of Intention" by Bernie Lubell 
April - June, 19 91 



m 



A project of the S.F. Arts Commission and Friends of the Arts. 



yssp'' Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Friday:! 1-5, Thursday 11-8, Saturday 12-5 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



AGENDA 

Visual Arts Committee Meeting 

June 26, 1991 

3 p.m. 

25 Van Ness, Suite 240 



MAYOR 
AftAgnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
Dodie Rosekrans 



OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



3:00 I. Approval of Minutes from May 22, 1991 

3:05 II. Consent Calendar 

A. Extend contract for conservation 
report from Jim Bernstein (Ct. 
#2890010) through August 31, 1991. 

B. Approve final payment of $1,987.50 
to Jim Bernstein for FEMA 
conservation contract (Ct. #2890004) 

f" . Approve extension of Alice Aycock's 
design contract for main library 
through August 31, 1991. 

D. Motion to approve team of Daniel 
Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and 
Roger White for Moscone/Howard 
Street Project. 

E. Motion to approve request to 
increase maquette fees for the 
Moscone/Howard Street Project Artist 
Teams by an amount not to exceed 
$6,000 per team. 

F. Approve removal and disposal of 
Robert Irwin's sculptures, 
Black/white Ceremonial Gates, 
Pacific Asian Port of Entry, which 
sustained irreparable damage as a 
result of the 1989 Loma Prieta 
Earthquake ; the 2 onyx rocks 
incorporated in the sculptures will 
be stored until such time as they 
they can be incorporated into an 
appropriate City (non-art) project. 

See Staff report, enclosed 



!■> 



3) 



3 



G. Set July 31st as next regular 
meeting for the Visual Arts 
Committee . 

3:10 III. Murals: 

A. Horace Washington and Ann Sherry 

B. Edwardo Pineda and Ray Patlan 

3:30 IV. New Langton Arts 

Bruce Tomb and John Randolph: Request for 
endorsement of public art project planned 
for Folsom St. 

3:40 V. New Art Enrichment: 

A. Bayview Police Station: 

Jill Manton; Lt. Tom Suttmeier and 
Peter Wong, architect. 

B. Fire Station #37 

Jill Manton; Bruce Flynn, Bureau of 
Architecture 

C. Fire Station #2 

Jill Manton; Roger Wong 

D. Municipal Parking Garages: 5th & 
Million; Ellis O'Farrell; North 
Beach; General Hospital: 

Tonia Macneil 

Request to approve Selection Panel 
for 4 garages and authorization to 
pay an honorarium of $75 per 1/2 day 
to panelists. 

E. Millbrae Facility Expansion 
Jill Manton; Tonia Macneil 
Introduction of new project; report 
on preliminary discussions with UEB 
and proposed art concept. 

4:20 VI. Bush-Polk Garage 

Tonia Macneil; Bruce Hasson, Kevin 
Hagerty, Gordon Chong and Assoc. 
Presentation of artwork and request for 
approval of color proposed by the 
artist . 



agencom6/26 Page - 2 



4:30 VII. Gallery 

Ann Meissner 



A. Implications of having Intersection 
for the Arts as a fiscal agent. 
See enclosed document from 
Intersection for the Arts. 

B. Gallery budget and programming for 

t calendar year 
The California Arts Council declined 
the Gallery's request for a $20,000 
grant for FY91/92. The Gallery has 
received CAC grants each year for 6 
years. CAC felt that programming 
costs should be carried by the City 
at this time. The Committee needs 
to discus the impact on 
programming/staffing as a result of 
this grant loss. 

Presentation of artists for 
concurrent solo exhibits planned 
August 22-Oct. 3, 1991 

5:00 VII T. Collections: 
~^i A. Pioneer Monument 

m> Molly Lambert; staff report 

B. Deaccessioning Policies 
Susan Pontious 

Review and comment on policy draft 
See staff report, copy of exist ing 
policies , and proposed draft of 
policy additions , enclosed 

5:20 IX. Market Street Art in Transit Program 

Jill Manton 

5:30 X. Embarcadero Promenade 

Jill Manton 

A. Selection of artists 

B. Approval of Budget 

5:40 XI . Library 

Jill Manton; Susan Pontious 

Project update 

See Staff report, enclosed 



agencom6/26 Page - 3 



5; 50 XII. Mental Health Facility 

Susan Pontious; project update 
See staff report, enclosed . 

5:55 XII] . Airport 

Susan Pontious; project update 
See minutes of June 6 Airport Art 
Steering Committee , enclosed . 

6:00 XIV. Adjournment 



agencom6/26 Page 



City and County 
of Son Francisco 




MINUTER 

Visual Arts Committee Meeting 

25 Van Ness Avenue June 26, 1991 

Suite 240 o 

San Francisco. CA 94102 nn p ' m ' 

(415)554-%71 25 Van Ness, Suite 70 

The Meeting was called to order at 4:30 p.m. 

Commissioners Present: 

mayor Anne Healy, (Chair) 
ArtAgnos Barbara Sklar 
Robert LaRocca 



COMMISSIONERS 



Staff Present: 



Barbara Sklar JiH Manton 

President 

Tonia Macneil 

Nancy Boas 

Vice President Susan PontlOUS 

Vernon Alley 

Stanley Eicheibaum I. Approval of Minutes from May 22, 1991 

Kim Fowler ,, . , , » . i_ 

DonieiGenera Commissioner Sklar moved to approve the minutes ol the 

AnneHeaiy Visual Arts Committee of May 22, 1991. Commissioner 

John Kriken in j j T ^ j 

Robert f LaRocca LaRocca seconded. Tt was so moved. 

' malia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 

-— Y Okamoto T T „ . „ , , 

> ^ieRosekrans Ix - Consent Calendar 

"~- A. Motion to extend contract for conservation report 

from Jim Bernstein (Ct. #2890010) through August 31, 1991. 

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the B. Motion to approve final payment of $1,987.50 to Jim 

libfa^commbston. Bernstein for FEMA conservation contract (CT. #2890004) 

Planning Commission. 

Commi!'sio 1 n andPC ' rl< C - Motion to approve extension of Alice Aycock's design 

contract for Main Library through August 31, 1991 

DIRECTOR 

Claire N Isaacs D. Motion to approve team and proposal concept of Daniel 

Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and Roger White for Moscone 

programs Center/Howard Street Art Enrichment Project. 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 

CMc Design Review E. Motion to approve request to increase maquette fees 

Nekjhborhood Arts for the Moscone Center/Howard Street artist teams for an 

POPS Symphony Concerts ' 

Public Art Program amount not to exceed $6,000 per team. 

Street Artists Licenses 

F. Motion to approve removal and disposal of Robert 
Suite430 Irwin's sculptures, Black/White Ceremonial Gates, Pacific 

State-Local Partnership * ' ... ,. .,. 

415-554-9677 Asian Port of Entry, which sustained irreparable damage as 

ArtHouse a resu it of the 1989 Lorna Prieta Earthquake; the 2 onyx 

rocks incorporated in the sculptures will be stored until 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
'5-554-9682 



such time as they can be incorporated into an appropriate 
City (non-art) project. 



VAC-MIN626 . 91-twm Page 



G. Motion to set July 31, 1991 as next regular meeting of 
the Visual Arts Committee. 

Commissioner Healy moved approval of the consent calendar, 
Commissioner Sklar seconded. The vote was unanimous. 



III. Art Enric 

Bruce Flynn of 
schematic cone 
Fire Station # 
is $1.3 millio 
$26,000. He a 
opportuni ties 
of the Committ 
be workable fo 
work on the ex 
project will b 
July or August 



hment: Fire Station #37 

the Bureau of Architecture presented 3 
epts for the seismic upgrade and redesign of 
37 on Potrero Hill. The construction budget 
n, and the Art Enrichment budget would be 
sked for the Committee's guidance as to 
for art enrichment at the site. The sense 
ee is that either of the three schemes would 
r art enrichment and that an artist should 
terior public facades of the building. The 
e presented to the Civic Design Committee in 



TV. Art Enrichment: Fire Station #2 

Clyde Cohen, project manager, and Roger Wong, project 
architect, from the Bureau of Architecture, presented the 
schematic design and model for a new fire station at 
Powell Street in Chinatown. The budget for Art Enrichment 
will be $50,000. The presenters suggested that an artist 
might work on the glass surfaces of the bay windows, 
canopies and light fixtures. The Commission approved this 
concept and suggested that the canopies and light fixtures 
might also be treated as sculptural elements by the 
artist . 



V. Art Enrichment: Bayview Police 
Jill Manton and Peter Wong from the 
presented the project to the Commit 
allocated for the artwork. Artists 
opportunity to design projects for 
building. Areas of focus will be t 
entry and the community meeting roo 
panel will consist of the Visual Ar 
participation from the Police Depar 
and Peter Wong from the Bureau of A 
artist/community member will be inv 
the selection process as well. Jil 
Sam or Dewey Grumpier as possible c 
representatives. She noted that ou 
community groups in the neighborhoo 



Station 

Police Department 
tee. $39,000 is 

will have the 
public areas within the 
he public lobby, main 
ms . The selection 
ts Committee with 
tment (Lt. Suttmeier) 
rchitecture. A guest 
ited to participate in 
1 Manton suggested Joe 
ommunity 

treach has been done to 
d. 



VAC-MIN6 2 6.91-twm 



Page - 2 



^ 



VI. Mural Resource Center: 1250 Eddy Street 

Horace Washington and Anne Sherry will create a tile and 
paint mural in the courtyard of the building at 1250 Eddy 
Street. The theme is international plants, which will be 
painted on the ground floor walls to a height of 12'. 
Children from the Head Start Program in the building will 
create flower designs for inclusion in the mural. The 
project is scheduled to begin in the next two months. 
Commissioner Healy moved approval of the concept and 
design. Commissioner Sklar seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 

VII. Mural Resource Center: 24th Street at Balmy Alley 

Eduardo Pineda and Ray Patlan will create a mural on a 
100' long wall at 24th Street between Balmy Alley and 
Harrison. The mural will begin at 4 1/2', above a tile 
wall, and rise to a height of 11'. The mural is dedicated 
to children and is about children playing. Commissioner 
Healy moved approval of the concept and design and 
Commissioner Sklar seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 



VIII. Gallery: Exhibition for August 29-October 3 

Gallery Director Anne Meissner presented slides of the two 
artists proposed for two concurrent solo exhibitions 
beginning August 29. Rudgen Roldan will show bas-relief 
paintings in paint and wax dealing with her family and 
background. Robert Cataluschi will create a large-scale 
work using wood, translucent materials and projections. 
Commissioner Healy recommended that the artists be in 
separate rooms in order to mitigate the difference in 
scale, and moved to approve the artists for the August 29 
exhibition. Commissioner Sklar seconded. It was so 
moved . 

IX. Public Request: New Langton Arts 

Renny Pritikin of New Langton Arts and artists Bruce Tomb 
and John Randolph presented the artists proposal for a 
work of art to be installed in the gallery and on Folsom 
Street in October. The gallery lias received a $10,000 NEA 
grant to fund the project, which is described as an 
acknowledgment of Folsom Street's "freeway" quality. 
Heavy metal construction plates will be laid on the street 
with pressure sensitive equipment and pneumatic pumps 
beneath. The action of cars crossing the plates will 
generate air- pressure which will be stored to activate a 
sculpture within the gallery. The gallery and artists 
requested the Arts Commission's endorsement of the project 



VAC-MI N626 . 91 -twm Page 



and help in guiding them through the City approval 
process. The Commission urged the artists to address the 
possibility of danger to pedestrians and directed staff to 
help the artists with City approvals as possible. 
Commissioner Healy moved to endorse the project and 
Commissioner LaHocca seconded. It was so moved. 



X. Art Enrichment: Municipal Parking Garages 

Tonia Macneil presented the time line for the selection of 
artists for the Parking Garages and a list of potential 
panelists and alternates for the Selection Panel. The 
proposed panelists are: Peter Phau , Rebecca Solnit, Hung 
Liu, Peter Richards and John Woodall. Commissioner Healy 
recommended Martha Heavenston. Commissioner Sklar was 
appointed Committee liaison. The selection panelists 
will receive an honorarium of $75.00 per day for their 
time. Commissioner Healy moved approval of the Selection 
Panel, Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 

XI. Art Enrichment: Moscone Center/Howard Street 

Tonia Macneil requested that the Commission authorize the 
Director to enter into a design development contract with 
the team of Daniel Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and Roger 
White for the Moscone Center/Howard Street Art Enrichment 
project for an amount not to exceed $50,000. Commissioner 
Healy moved to approve the request, Commissioner LaRocca 
seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

XII. Art Enrichment: Bush-Polk Parking Garage 

Artist Bruce Hasson presented one of the completed panels 
for the grillwork for the Bush-Polk Parking Garage. All 
of the panels have been cast and the screens are in the 
process of fabrication. The Committee complemented him on 
the results. The artist requested that the panel approve 
the unpainted aluminum surface for the grillwork. He will 
conduct a test of the panels to determine whether sealing 
with a clear sealant will be necessary, and return to the 
committee to give a report. Commissioner LaRocca moved to 
approve the unpainted aluminum surface. Commissioner 
Sklar seconded. tt was so moved. 

XIII. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero Promenade 

Jill Manton explained the three proposals which had been 
presented to the Selection Panel following a charette for 
the Embarcadero Promenade project. The Selection Panel 
recommended the team of Vito Acconci, Stanley Saitowitz 
and Barbara Stauffacher Solomon. The budget for the 



VAC-MIN626. 91-twm Page 



design and implementation of the artwork on the South and 
North sections of the Promenade is $600,000. Funding for 
the middle section will be obtained from another source. 
During general discussion, the Commissioners noted 
problems presented by the tilt of the light fixtures and 
the troughs, and asked that these be addressed before 
granting final approval for implementation. Commissioner 
Healy moved to approve the team and conceptual proposal of 
Acconci, Saitowitz and Solomon, contingent upon resolution 
of financial, safety, construction and maintenance issues. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

XIV. Art Enrichment: Market Street 

Jill Manton asked the Committee to approve payment of 
$1500 to Earl Gee to create new designs for the Market 
Street Bus Shelters. Commissioner LaRocca made the 
motion, Commissioner Healy seconded. It was so moved. 

XV. Gallery: Fiscal Agent 

Anne Meissner informed the Committee of the Gallery's 
arrangement with Intersection for the Arts as fiscal agent 
and explained the consequences of the relationship. 

-A 10% fiscal agent fee will be taken for each grant 
received. This money cannot be taken from the grant 
itself, but must come from some other source. 

-The Gallery no longer has access to the non-profit 
bulk mail postage rate available through the former 
Friends of the Arts Commission. The new postage rate, for 
bulk mailing, is twice as expensive as previously. 

-All mail must now bear the return address of 
Intersection . 

-Publicity for programs such as City-Site must now 
acknowledge the sponsorship of Intersection. 

-Funding sources will now view the Gallery as one of 
Intersection's sponsored projects, and will assess the 
Gallery's request in competition with other Intersection 
requests . 

Commissioners recommended that the Gallery's address be 
prominently displayed next to Intersection on all 
mailings . 

XVI. Gallery: Budget and Programming 

Anne Meissner presented the Gallery's revised budget for 
1991-1992. She explained that the budget was severely 
constrained because the California Arts Counsel had denied 
the Gallery's request for $20,000 for the new fiscal year. 
This news was received in mid-June. The grant was denied 



VAC-MIN626. 91-twm Page - 5 



because the CAC panel felt that ongoing programming should 
be covered by municipal, rather than state funding. 

The budget has now been cut to a minimum. Artists will 
now receive only $400.00 as an honorarium. The printing 
budget is much lower, and the budget for the outdoor lot 
has been reduced from $9000.00 per project to $6,500.00. 
Expenses for 1991-1992 exceed income by $9,600.00. 

Discussion followed concerning ways and means of balancing 
the budget. Meissner stressed that the Gallery would 
continue to seek funding from private organizations. She 
presented a number of alternative solutions to the current 
crisis. Commissioners made several suggestions to 
increase revenues and decrease expenditures, including: 
-Hold an exhibition of Commission collection or public art 
projects. 

-Extend length of exhibitions, so that there are fewer 
exhibitions per year. 

-Use the City-Site lot at Christmas time as a Christmas 
Tree lot to auction off artist-designed Christmas trees. 
-Hold the Pops Concert Opening Night Reception at the 
Gallery, with proceeds contributed to the Gallery's 
overhead . 

XVII. Art Enrichment: Administrative Fees 

Jill Manton asked the Committee to approve an increase in 
the amount of administrative fees for 1990-1991 for Art 
Enrichment projects, pending authorization of the Board of 
Supervisors and permission of the respective project 
agencies. Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve an 
increase of from 10 to 20%. Commissioner Healy seconded 
the motion. It was so moved. 

XVIII. Collections: Pioneer Monument 

Molly Lambert, acting Collections Manager and Civic Design 
coordinator, reported on a recent informational 
presentation to the Planning Commission by the project 
architects of the New Main Library. She noted that the 
issue of ethnic insensitivi ty regarding the Pioneer 
Monument should be considered carefully in the discussion 
of options for moving the monument well before any action 
is taken by this Committee. 

XIX. Collections: Deaccessioning Policy 

Susan Pontious presented a draft of the new deaccessioning 
policy developed in response to the emergency removal of 



VAC-MIN626.91-twm Page - 6 



the Robert Irwin sculpture at the San Francisco 
International Airport. She noted that the changes are 
additions to the existing policy. 

XX. Art Enrichment: Market Street Art in Transit 

Jun Jalbuena, subcontractor to the Market Street Art 
Master Plan team, requested that the Commission authorize 
staff to develop a separate contractual relationship with 
him with an extended deadline and additional funding. He 
explained that lie had done much of the work on the project 
himself, and wished to continue working on the project 
separately from the team. Jill Manton explained that last 
week, after reviewing a draft of MP prepared by Jun, 
she expressed her willingness to work with Jun through the 
Delancy Cochran Contract, but explained that she as a 
representative of the Commission would have editorial 
control and that no time or financial charges could be 
made. Jun did not accept the conditions. The Committee 
acknowledged the hard work and diligence of Jun and stated 
that the Commission was not involved with his contract 
with the prime contractor. It was unfortunate that he did 
not receive a greater fee; but they could not authorize a 
new contract with Jun. The Committee did not approve the 
request . 

Commissioner LaRocca commented on the billboard proposals, 
remarking that he felt that responses to the billboards 
would be limited and that staff should consider use of 
newspaper, L.E.D. signs and subway posters as well. 

XXI. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero 

Jill Manton reported on a meeting between herself, Margie 
O'Driscoll and Rudy Nothenberg concerning funding for the 
Embarcadero Promenade project. The CAO agreed to a total 
art enrichment expenditure of $1.4 million, for the north 
and south segments of the Promenade and an administrative 
budget of $150,000. 



XXII. Art Enrichment: New Public Library 
Jill Manton and Susan Pontious reported on their 
discussions with Lothar Baumgarten about his fees for the 
project. After lengthy discussion, they asked the artist 
what he would be able to accomplish for the $100,000 fee. 
His reply has not yet been received. Susan Pontious 
passed on the request of Anne Hamilton to include her 
collaborator, Anne Chamberlain, as an equal partner in the 
next design contract. The Committee reminded Pontious 



VAC-MIN626 . 91-twm Page 



that the reason for the current contractual relationship 
was to be sure that the creative input on the project came 
from Anne Hamilton, rather than both artists. The 
Committee denied the request. 

XXIII. Art Enrichment: Mental Health Facility 

Susan Pontious requested that Hilda Shum be able to work 
with a collaborator who would paint Shum's designs on the 
columns she has proposed for the Skilled Mental Health 
Facility. The Committee agreed to her request. 

XXIV. ADJOURNMENT 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:30 p.m. 



REPORTS AND ORDERS: 

1. Ordered: Approval of the May 22, 1991 minutes. 
Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vote; Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Approval to extend contract for 
conservation report from Jim Bernstein ( CT . #2890010) 
through August 31, 1991. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

3. Ordered: Approval of final payment of $1,987.50 to 
Jim Bernstein for FEMA conservation contract (Ct. 
#2890004) 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: Approval of extension of Alice Aycock's 
design contract for main library through August 31, 1991. 
Move: Commisioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Approval of team and proposal concept of 
Daniel Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and Roger White for the 
Moscone Center/Howard Street Art Enrichment Program. 
Move: Commisioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: Approval of increase in maquette fees for 
the Moscone Center/Howard Street Project to an amount not 
to exceed $6,000 per team. 

Move: Commisioner Healy 



VAC-M IN626 . 91 - twm Page 



Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: Approval to remove and dispose of 
Robertlrwin ' s sculptures, Black/White Ceremonial Gates, 
Pacific Asian Port of Entry, which sustained irreparable 
damage as a result of the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake; the 
2 onyx rocks incorporated in the sculptures will be stored 
until such time as they can be incorporated into an 
appropriate City (non-art) project. 

Move: Commisioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

8. Approval of July 31, 1991 as the next regular meeting 
of the Visual Arts Committee. 

Move: Commisioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

9. Approval of mural proposal on the theme of 
international plants by Horace Washington and Anne Sherry 
for a paint and tile mural in the courtyard of the 
building at 1250 Eddy Street. 

Move: Commisioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

10. Approval of mural proposal by Eduardo Pineda and Ray 
Patlan for a mural dedicated to children at 24th Street 
between Balmy Alley and Harrison. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

11. Approval of artists Rudgen Roldan and Robert 
Cataluschi for concurrent solo exhibitions at the Arts 
Commission Gallery from August 29 to October 3, 1991. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

12. Endorsement of New Langton Arts project by artists 
Bruce Tomb and John Randolph. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

13. Approval of members and alternates of the Selection 
Panel for the 4 Municipal Parking Garages. The panelists 
are Peter Phau , Rebecca Solnit, Hung Liu, John Woodall, 
Peter Richards and Martha Heavenston and authorization to 
pay an honorarium of $75.00 per day to each panelist. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN626. 91-twm Page 



14. Authorization to the Director to enter into a design 
development contract with the artists Daniel Martinez, 
Renee Petropoulos and Roger White for the Moscone 
Center/Howard Street project for an amount not to exceed 
$50,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

15. Approval of the unpainted aluminum surface for the 
grill work at Bush-Polk Parking Garage, as requested by 
artist Bruce Hasson. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

16. Authorization of the team of Vito Acconci, Stanley 
Saitowitz and Barbara Stauf f acher-Solomon to create a work 
of art for the Embarcadero Promenade, for a total maximum 
project budget, inclusive of design and implementation, of 
$600,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

17. Approval of payment of $1,500.00 to artist Earl Gee 
for new poster designs for the Market Street bus shelters. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

18. Authorization to charge an art enrichment fee 
ranging from 10 to 20% for all 1990/1991 projects, pending 
authorization by the Board of Supervisors and permission 
from the respective project agencies involved. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN626 .91-twm Page - 10 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



TO: 



FROM: 



RE: 



Coi\<3ewT CaUkJL 



lA^- 



Visual Arts Committee 



Susan Pontious 



Irwin Sculpture 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Rai Y. Okamoto 
^odie Rosekrans 



\ 



OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



History: Dennis Oh, 
review the feasibilit 
submitted a written o 
meeting) stating that 
and maintain their sc 
another earthquake, 
the sculptures cannot 
For the same reason, 
their reinstallation 
city. 



the structura 
y of repairin 
pinion (distr 

the sculptur 
ulptural inte 
Because of th 

be reinstall 
the City Atto 
in any other 



1 engineer engaged to 
g the sculptures, has 
ibuted at the last VAC 
es cannot be repaired 
grity in the event of 
e potential liability, 
ed in the airport, 
rney has prohibited 
public site in the 



The artist has been informed of the situation, and the 
options available, i.e. 1) removal and storage, 
2)transfer of title to him, and, at his expense, 
returning the sculptures to him, and 3)disposal of the 
sculptures . 

He has written a letter authorizing removal and disposal 
of the sculptures, and waiving any rights he may have 
under the California Preservation Act. He has 
authorized the re-use of the sculptures' onyx rocks in 
another City project, as long as it is not an art 
project . 

Staff Recommendation: I see no realistic alternative 
other than the removal and disposal of the sculptures, 
with the exception of the rocks, which should be stored 
until such time as an appropriate (non-art) city project 
can be identified. 



Arts Commission Gallery 
1 55 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 




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VIEW OF TYPICAL STEEL ROAD PLATES LAID ACROSS ENTIRE STREET 






JUNE 26, 1991 



BUREAU OF ARCHITECTURE 

ART ENRICHMENT PROJECT DATA SHEET 



JOB NUMBER: 5224A 

JOB TITLE: NEW FIRE STATION NO. 37 

ADDRESS: 798 WISCONSIN ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

PROJECT MANAGER 1.) BOA - BRUCE FLYNN/ROGER WONG 
2.) ARTS COMMISSION - 

TOTAL PROJECTS COST: $ 1,450,000 

ELIGIBLE COST: $ 1,300,000 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: REMOVE (E) STATION AND BUILD NEW 9,000 SQ. 
FT. STATION 

DATE OF 1.) PROPOSED ADVERTISING DATE: JANUARY 1992 
2.) CIVIC DESIGN PRESENTATION: JULY 1991 

BREAK DOWN OF ART ENRICHMENT FEE: 

MANAGEMENT: 

ARTISTS FEE: 

CONSULTANTS FEE: 

MATERIALS FEE: 

OTHER 

TOTAL: 

PROPOSED SCOPE OF ART ENRICHMENT: 

METHOD OF ARTIST SELECTION: 

ARTIST QUALIFICATIONS: 






San Francisco, Fire Department 

Station #2 - New Facility 

1340 Powell Street 



Art Commission Discussion 

A. Items Presented 

* Photos of existing site and neighborhood 

* Schematic floor plans. 

* Schematic exterior elevations and section. 

* Study model. 

* Study perspective. 

* Sample material/color board. 

B. Highlight of Exterior Design. 

* Compatibility with Chinatown Street scene. 

* Use of bay window and front canopies. 

* Introduction of planting. 

* Use of patio decks to relieve massiveness of structure and provide exterior 
relaxation for fire fighters 

* Choice of materials to project permanence and importance of life/ safety 
functions. 

C. Potential Art Enrichment . 

* Glass Street Canopies (3 at 6'-0 wide X 1 1 '-0" long) 

* Glass at Bay Window (9'-0" X 9'-0") 

* Sidewalk (9'-0" wide X 46'-6" long). 

* 4 exterior wall light lanterns. 

* Interior wall mural at front apparatus Room. 






City and County of San Francisco 



Art Commission 




Memorandum 



Claire N. Isaacs 
DIRECTOR 



Date: 
To: 
From: 
Subject: 



June 20, 1991 

Members of the Visual Arts Committee 

Tonia Macneil 

June 26 Visual Arts Committee Meeting 
Staff Report 




(415)554-9671 



I . Consent Calendar 

D. On June 20, 1991, the Selection Panel for the 
Moscone Convention Center/Howard Street Project met to 
select a finalist for the project. The Panel, made up of 
members of the Visual Arts Committee and guest curator 
Helene Fried, unanimously selected the team of Daniel 
Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and Roger White. Their 
proposal was approved contingent upon development of a 
feasible budget and design and re-evaluation of the use of 
language . 

E. The Visual Arts Committee has previously approved 
a maquette fee of $3,500 as well as some related travel 
and housing expenses. For administrative reasons, it is 
necessary to identify a dollar amount for these additional 
expenses. The candidates have submitted receipts and will 
be reimbursed for approved costs which should total less 
than $6,000 per team. 

II. New Art Enrichment 

D. Municipal Parking Garages. 

BACKGROUND 

At the May 22 meeting of the VAC, the Committee agreed to 
a combined selection process for the 4 upcoming Parking 
Garage projects, combining the selection of artists for 3 
new garages with the Ellis-0 ' Farrell project which is 
already underway. 

A pool of artists is being developed, which will be 
reviewed by a Selection Panel who will recommend a small 
number of artists for each of the four sites. The Visual 
Arts Committee, with advice from the client agency and the 
project architect, will then select the finalist and award 
the commission for each site. 

25 VAN NESS AVE. SUITE 240 SAN FRANCISCO, 94102 



TIMELINE 

Deadline for submission of applications: July 19, 1991 

Meeting of the Selection Panel to review slides and develop 
short lists: July 29 or 30 

Selection of finalists for El 1 is-0 ' Farrell and Hospital 
Parking Garages: July 31, 1991 

(Selection of finalists for the other projects will be held 
at a later meeting) 

ACTION REQUIRED: 

Identify a Selection Panel and authorize the payment of a 

small honorarium. 

A 6-member panel including 5 outside members and a liaison 
from the Visual Arts Committee would be adequate for this 
project. In addition it would be useful to select at least 
two alternates to insure availability. The following names 
are proposed by staff: 

Peter Phau , architect 
Rebecca Solnit, art critic 
Hung Liu, artist 
John Woodall, artist 
Peter Richards, artist 

I will be contacting you to receive your suggestions for 
panelists before the meeting, so that the Selection Panel 
can be finalized at that time. 



II. Bush-Polk Parking Garage 

BACKGROUND 

Bruce Hasson has completed the fabrication of the grillwork 
for Bush-Polk Garage. He suggests that the grillwork remain 
un-painted, retaining the silver-grey aluminum surface. The 
panels would be coated with a clear sealant for protection. 
Commissioner LaRocca and the project architects from Gordon 
Chong and Associates have viewed the completed panels and 
concur with the artist's judgement. 

The artist will present a completed grillwork panel and 
samples of color proposed for the building. 

ACTION REQUIRED 

Approval of a color for the grillwork for the Bush-Polk 

Parking Garages. 



.,) 




A^uiflL X4au ZZL 



SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

I 55 Grove Street, San Francisco. California 94 1 02 (415) 554-9682 



For Immediate Release: 

June 1, 1991 

Contact: Anne Meissner 

Kathleen Kolba 

(415) 554-9682 

Juana Alicia 

Carlos Loarca 

Darryl Sapien 

Rico Solinas 

in memoriam 

Eva Garcia aka VENUS 

Exhibition: June 28 - August 9,1991 
Reception: Thursday, June 27, 5:00-7:00PM 

Works by five artists with roots in the Latino community, on exhibit in 
the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery's upcoming show, will highlight 
the diversity of artistic interests among these Bay Area artists. 

Juana Alicia. Los Puntos Cardinales. Portraits of four women 
suspended from the Gallery rafters in a pattern corresponding to four 
directions together with a floor painting in the center create a "circle of 
balance". As Juana Alicia explains, the circle is "a fundamental world view 
of all indigenous people of the Americas: the concept of life forces from five 
cardinal points - four directions and the center". Each direction offers 
qualities, values and sensibilities essential for the other. For the individual, 
this construct applies to being centered in yourself and connected to family, 
community, and by extension to the rest of the world. Juana Alicia 
approached the portraits as a collaboration between herself and the sitter. She 
asked the sitter to assume a mood of defiance and then depicted the differing 
body languages to reveal strength in anger. Like the murals for which she is 
known locally and internationally, Los Puntos Cardinales is from 
multicultural perspective and serves to empower the viewer. 

Carlos Loarca. Art and Space/All the Relationships. For the past ten vears 
Loarca's artistic concerns have been twofold: the animistic mythological 



world of his Guatamalan heritage and the element of space in painting. He's 
included space under different formats; for example, graphically, color fields, 
symbols, and ultimately combining the painting with 'Real Space Around It'. 
Using the Gallery's rafters and building easels beneath, Loarca will install his 
Yellow Series paintings and sculptures back to back, creating two identical 
views of the same art work. 

Darryl Sapien. But When TJiey Looked There Tiie Cupboard Was Bare; 
Oh, Icarus; Huevos Pendejos. Sapien continues his commentary on 
personal, social, and political issues with these three new works. Using 
assemblages of old commercial signs, product trademarks, found objects and 
painting, Sapien suggests catastrophic losses for which man, with arrogance 
or ignorance, should be held responsible. 

Rico Solinas. Solinas' painting formats are a large scale book (5' x 7') and 
used saws. On the blades of the saws Solinas paints images of semi-rigs 
barrelling across the American landscape. He captures the suspenseful 
moment when the truck may not make the curve, an embankment may give 
way, or falling rocks may wreck havoc. Man and nature are pitted against 
each other. The saw's format contributes to the impact of the painting. The 
work is composed in conjunction with or in opposition to the shape of the 
blades. The painting and the act of painting resonate with the work ethic 
found in the human shape inscribed in the saw handles and the strength of 
the saw's teeth. To Solinas saws and trucks signify man's ingenuity in 
creating the means to dominate and destroy the landscape. Solinas looks at 
his artistic process and subject as a tragicomical cycle: on site, preliminary 
studies of trucks; back to the studio to paint; creating the tension of truck vs. 
nature; the truck must be strong enough to win out so the artist can leave the 
studio and continue his studies. 

In memoriam an installation by Mia G. de Gonzalez and Lorraine Garcia- 
Nakata celebrates Eva Garcia aka VENUS who died in May following a brief 
illness. Eva worked as a visual and performance artist and dancer, and she 
created over twenty-five of Galeria de la Raza's outdoor billboards. This 
installation includes her charcoal works Gabriela and Can Do , work tools 
and step ladder, an array of shoes, and her "Venus" leather jacket. Eva's 
charcoal portraits, wrote her sister Lorraine, "incorporated other objects or 
animals to further her subject; more recently the animals claimed more a 
protagonist role rather than a supportive role.. .In cultures as our own, alter or 



spiritual selves, 'allies', have surfaced as animal entities marking an even 
more accurate view of self and our role in this and other realities. ..If ever it 
can be said that an artist's life ran parallel to her work, this is surely the time" 



####### 
Photographs available on request. 

####### 

Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Friday, llam-5pm; 

Thursday, llam-8pm; 

Saturday, 12-5pm. 

Closed, July 4 
Extended hours: in celebration of the San Francisco Arts Commission/Symphony POPS 
Concerts, the gallery will be open on July 18, 19, 20, 24, 26, 27, 30, 31 and August 3 from 
6:30pm until showtime. 
Free admission. Handicap accessible. 

The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery is a not-for-profit exhibition space under the 
auspice of the San Francisco Arts Commission, City and County of San Francisco. It is also 
funded in part by the California Arts Council, the LEF Foundation, Bank of America, and 
other business and private contributions. The Gallery's Exploration: City Site program 
receives sponsorship from Intersection for the Arts. The Gallery is a member of the National 
Association of Artists' Organizations (NAAO), Bay Area Consortium for Visual Arts 
(BACVA), Non-Profit Gallery Association (NPGA) and the San Francisco Convention and 
Visitors Bureau. 




Aguuk. J^umM 



SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

1 55 Grove Street, San Francisco. California 94 102 (415) 554-9682 

For Immediate Release 

May 15, 1991 
Contact: 
Anne Meissner 
Kathleen Kolba 
(415) 554-9682 

ARTISTS CHARLES GUTE, BERNIE LUBELL, and MIE PRECKLER NAMED 
RECIPIENTS OF EXPLORATION: CITY SITE 1991 AWARDS 

Mie Preckler, Sal Terrae, 

Exhibition: June 27-September 27 

Reception: Thursday June 27, 5:00-7:00pm 
Charles Gute 

Exhibition: October 18 - December 18 

Reception: Thursday, October 17, 5-7:00pm 
Bernie Lubell, The Archaeology of Intention 

Exhibition: April - June, 1992 

Bay Area artists Charles Gute, Bernie Lubell and Mie Preckler are 
recipients of Exploration: City Site 1991 awards sponsored by the San Francisco 
Arts Commission Gallery. Each artist is commissioned to install a temporary 
site-generated project in the 6,000 square foot lot adjacent to the Gallery in 
Civic Center. 

Exploration: City Site jurors were Gyongy Laky, Renny Pritikin and 
Larry Rinder. Applicants were challenged to submit proposals for projects 
which explore the inherent qualities of the underdeveloped and highly 
visible Civic Center site. Winning projects demonstrate alternatives to 
traditional modes of public art and explore the viability of these art forms 
within the context of urban design. 

Sal Terrae by Mie Preckler will be on view June 27 through September 
27, 1991. To Preckler, the site suggests a duality of ruins and remains ; its slope 
suggests shift/ movement/ and change. She will divide the site by placing 
dark soil in the Northern Grove Street section, and course rock salt in the 
sloped Southern, Ivy Street side. Where salt and earth meet, she'll construct 
a salt brick wall patterned on existing brick walls and chimney remains . The 



2 

installation will suggest a slide/shift movement of the salt boulders into the 

earth area. 

Sal Terrae , the salt of the earth, speaks specifically about salt being vital 
for life and capable of destroying it. The installation continues the artist's 
dialogue with materials and ideas addressed in previous work. Her 
investigations highlight salt's capacity "to embrace seemingly contradictory 
qualities"; for example, it "corrodes /preserves, hurts/heals, is vital for 
life/destroys life." Her conceptual framework is also based on dualities, she 
explores the simultaneous necessity and redundancy of the past and the 
proposition that disintegration and corrosion of materials may lead to 
integration and correlation of ideas. 

Preckler was born in Belgium and studied there at the National Higher 
Institute for Architecture and Urban Development. She holds an MFA from 
JFK University in Orinda, California. Previous works include To the Wall, 
New Langton Arts in 1990, A Bridge Piece, Berkeley Art Center, 1990; and 
Revference (sic), Headlands Center for the Arts, 1988. 

As the title of his most recent solo exhibition -- / like Conceptual 
Art/Conceptual Art Likes Me — suggests, Charles Gute's artmaking methods are 
conceptual in nature. A past student of such Bay Area conceptual artists as 
Howard Fried and Paul Kos, Gute's influences are clear. But rather than 
merely trafficking in the increasingly familiar strategies of a now historicized 
art movement, Gute infuses his conceptual investigations with a playful, 
often challenging irreverence. Using diverse and unseemly materials such as 
needlepoint and breakfast cereal, Gute's work simultaneously critiques and 
revitalizes a now comprised but still vital artistic agenda; one in which idea 
takes precedence over more traditional aesthetic concerns. Regarding his 
project for Exploration: City Site this fall, Gute says it will be "an exercise in 
site-specificity, taken to an extreme but logical degree." 

Gute's degrees include a B.F.A. from the University of Arizona and a 
M.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute, where he has taught classes in 
performance and video. 

The Archaeology of Intention by Bernie Lubell is scheduled for 
installation in Spring, 1992. With a "seriously whimsical" installation, Lubell 
continues his investigation of the process of thought and the problems of 
constructing reality from fragmentary information. Approaching the site as 
an archaeological field project, Lubell will dig trenches and holes throughout 



and place datum points and locating grids at points of interest. The 
excavation will reveal an "ancient" rope and pulley computer. "Although 
much of the function of the partially exposed device will seem to have been 
lost to time," he wrote, he "will be repair and reconstruct it so that portions 
are operational." Visitors will be encouraged to play with the work. By 
pulling ropes and levers at some locations, they'll see the effects produced in 
others. Cause and effect, chaos, catastrophe, together with the tactile aspects of 
the installation are part of the process of understanding "understanding" and 
reality. 

Lubell studied at the San Francisco Art Institute and holds a Masters 
Degree in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin. His recent solo 
installations include The Second Story; A Twice Failed Tale at LACE, Los 
Angeles and New Langton Arts, San Francisco and The Dangling Participle; A 
Catastrophe of Self-Organization at Bluxome Gallery in 1987. 

The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery has sponsored 
Exploration: City Site since 1986. Each artist receives up to $6,000 for materials 
and honoraria. Exploration: City Site funds are provided by the California 
Arts Council, the Public Art Fund of the San Francisco Arts Commission The 
LEF Foundation, and private contributions. 

####### 
Photographic materials available on request. 

####### 

The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery is a not-for-profit exhibition space under the 
auspice of the San Francisco Arts Commission, City and County of San Francisco. It is also 
funded in part by the California Arts Council, the LEF Foundation,Bank of America, and 
other business and private contributions. The Gallery's Exploration: City Site program 
receives sponsorship from Intersection for the Arts. The Gallery is a member of the National 
Association of Artists' Organizations (NAAO), Bay Area Consortium for Visual Arts 
(BACVA), Non-Profit Gallery Association (NPGA) and the San Francisco Convention and 
Visitors Bureau. 

Accessible viewing all hours. 

Admission to Exploration: City-Site projects during Gallery hours: 

Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Friday, llam-5pm; 

Thursday, llam-8pm; 

Saturday, 12-5pm. 

Closed, July 4, August 31. 
Extended hours: in celebration of the San Francisco Arts Commission/Symphony POPS 
Concerts, the gallery will be open on July 18, 19, 20, 24, 26, 27, 30, 31 and August 3 from 
6:30pm until showtime. 
Free admission. Handicap accessible-. 







SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

155 Grove Street. San Francisco. California 94102 (415) 554-9682 

May 8, 1991 

Program Schedule 
Gallery Exhibits 
1. Juana Alicia/Garcia/Loarca/Sapien/Sol i nas 

June 28 - August 9/ Reception: June 27, 5-7:00pra 

2- Concurrent Solo Exhibits. Artists to be announced. 

August 24 - October 4/ Reception: August 22, 5-7:00pra 

3. "Faster, Faster: Kill, Kill" 
Curated by Tony Labat 

October 18 - November 27/ Reception: October 17, 5-7:00pn? 

4. "Chain Reaction 7" 

December 17 - February 1/ Reception: December 19, 5-7 :00pm 

5. "Real Tears" 

February 15 - April 29, 1992 Reception: February 14, 5-7 



OOom 



Glen Helfand. Curator 
May/ June 199 2 - tba 



Exploration: City^Si te 

1. "Sal Terrae" by Mie Preckler 
June 28 - Sept. 27, 1991/ Reception: June 27, 5-7:00p"i 

2. Work by Charles Gute 
October 10 - December 18/ Reception: October 17. 5-7:00pr 

3. "The Archaeology of Intention" by Bernie Lubell 
April - June, 19 9 2 

A project of the S.F. Arts Commission and Friends of the Arts. 
IMP 7 Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Friday :1 1 -5, Thursday 11-8, Saturday 12-5 



s 



(fyudaL. Hau^W-Q 



Robert Catalusci 

936 Noe Street 

San Francisco, C A 94114 

415-285-4256 

415-626-7747 

Born: 1964, Los Angeles, CA 

EDUCATION 

1991 B.F.A. San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA 

1984 Santa Barbara City College, Santa Barbara, CA 
Independent Study Abroad in France and Italy 

1982-84 A.A. in Fine Arts, Santa Barbara City College, Santa 
Barbara, CA 

ONE-PERSON EXHIBITIONS 

1 990-91 On Site, Santa Cruz, CA 

Lighthouse, Public Installation on Pacific Garden Mall, Santa 

Cruz, CA 
1989 Southern Exposure Gallery, San Francisco, CA 

Destructive Architectural Response 

1 988 Richard/Bennett Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 
Exhibition of Sculpture, Constructions and Drawings 

1 986 Atkinson Gallery, Santa Barbara, CA 
Sculpture and Woodcuts 

GROUP EXHIBITIONS 

1989 Momentum Gallery, Ventura Arts Council 
Transformations: Four Artists 

1 988 Richard/Bennett Gallery, Los Angeles, CA Almost Functional 

Richard/Bennett Gallery, Los Angeles, CA Modern Markings 
La Arcada Plaza, Santa Barbara, CA Art Walk 

1987 Los Angeles Convention Center, Second International 

Contemporary Art Fair 
Richard/Bennett Gallery, Los Angeles, CA The Art of Politics 
Richard/Bennett Gallery, Los Angeles, CA California 

Figurative Sculpture Now 
1 986 Los Angeles Convention Center, First International 

Contemporary Art Fair 

1 985 Brooks Adobe Center for the Arts, Santa Barbara, CA 



R. Catalusci 



page 2 



GRANTS AND AWARDS 

1991 Chauncey McKeever Award, San Francisco Art Institute 

1991 Clinton Walker Foundation, Individual Artist Grant 

1989 Golden Seal Award, Sculpture, San Francisco Art Institute 

1983 SIFF Foundation Award 



EMPLOYMENT 

1989-present 

1990-present 

1990 

1986 

1983-85 

1983-84 



Installation Director, Capp Street Project, San 

Francisco, CA 

Instructor, Dublin High School. Artists in Education 

Program, Southern Exposure Gallery, San Francisco, CA 

Instructor, McCormick High School. Artists in Education 

Program, Southern Exposure Gallery, San Francisco, CA 

Apprenticeship with artist/architect Tom Kress, 

Santa Barbara, CA 

Teaching Assistant. Sculpture and bronze casting. Santa 

Barbara City College, Santa Barbara, CA 

Apprenticeship with sculptor Paul Lindhard 



SELECTED PUBLICATIONS AND REVIEWS 

Meg Sullivan, "Work Arises from Ashes", Los Angeles Time . Feb. 2, 1989 

Glen Helfand, "Chronology of Decay", Artweek . January 25, 1990 

Lee Quarnstrum, "Lighthouse Casts Artificial Light on Ruins", San Jose Mercury 

News . February 6, 1991 

Kathy Kreiger, "Mall Lighthouse Shows way to S. C.'s Safe Harbor" Santa Cruz 

Sentinel . April 7, 1991 



tyuAPL /«Tg 




SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

I 55 Grove Street. San Francisco. California 94 1 02 (4)5) 554-9682 



San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery 


Budget - FY 91 




Expenses - Stiff 




Salaries 


$ 68.393 


Fringes 


$ 20.09J 


Toul 




Expenses - Operations 




Phone 


$ 2,400 


Reproduction 


$ 600 


FieldExpense/Travel 
Office Postage 


$ 600 


$ 800 


Supplies 


$ 500 


Off iceEq uipmcntMaint. 




Computer/Typewriter 


$ 500 


ADTSecurity 


$ 900 


Insurance - Ftne Arts 


$ 1,000 


Shipping/Deliveries 


$ 400 


BmldingRepairtMaint. 


$ 7.500 


ARTWEEK + Sub sen ptions 


$ 600 


Total 




Total Operating Expenses 


Expenses - Exhibitions - Indoor 


Per Exhibit: 




Graphic Design 


$ 300 


Hostage - Announcements 


$ 400 » 


- press releases 


$ 50 


Printing 


$ 1,000 


AdmimstrativcAssistance 




Security + Reception 


$ 1,400 


Install ation- 




TechmcalA.s si stance 


< 500 


Arustvlateriais/Honoraria 


$ 400 


Recepf iodK eireshments 


$ 200 


InstallalionSupplies 


$ 200 


Signage - window 


$ 50 


Photodocuineatation 


$ 150 


Total '6wfc exnihit 


$ 4.650 


TotaI6exhibits/yeai 








$ 88.484 



$ 15,800 



$ 104.284 



$27,900 



►' 



fcipeRses - Kxploratton: City Site 

Per project 

Artist s Honorana $1,000 

Materials* Insurance $5,000 

Signage at site $ 200 

Press releases $ 1 00 

Pbotodocnraentation $ 200 

EachExhibit $ 6,500 

!'"tal for 3 exhibits/year $ 19,500 

(City Site is now announced and promoted 
together with indoor exhibits. Line items 
such as graphics, postage and printing are 
included id indoor exhibits budget above 
This is a savings of $3000+ /City Site project.) 
TotaJrixhiNt'onhxpenses $47,400 

Kxpenses - Other 

Fiscal Agent Fees 

10% ot LEF grant $ 75(J+ 

Social Security B encf its*' 

GaileryAttendants 

andTechnicalAssistants 3%(?) 

Slide Registry 

ClcricalAssisUinceprovided 

by Gallery Attendants -0- 

Advertising $ 400 

PnntedMatenals $ 400 

Postage $ 100 

Total $ 900 

TOTAL EXPENSES $ 153 .334 



INCOME 

City Hands - Salaries with Fringe $ KH.4K4 

-Operations $ 9,200 

-Building Repair $ 7,500 

Total $105,184 

(Jrants 

Public Art Fund - POPS/1991 (Tending) 
HaJI'isavailablelorFYVl Programs, 
Half is held in reserve for FY92. 
Program $ 10,000 

OpcratingExpense $ 9,700 

Total Grant $ 19,700 

Total Available for FY91 $ 9,850 

Reserves: 

PublicArtFund'Gallerv $ 9,000 

(includes POTS '$0 Grant) 
LF.F Grant/Intersection torthe Arts $ 7,500 
CACFY90/91 $ 6.000 

Total $22,500 

OtherRevenwe 

ReceptionRefreshments $ 1,200 

Donations at door $ 600 

Use of building 

(receptions, workshops) $ 1 ,500 

Commission on sale of artwork $ 400 

Slide Kegistrv Fees $ 2.500 

Total $ 6,200 

Total Income $143,734 



in Kind Support 

City Building, PG&E, Utilities 

Other; in-kindscrvicesandmaterials obtained 

as needed and identified by artists projects. 

Deficit ($ 9.600) 



A»rtii/ft/i Thin .&■ vur p 



Options foe a balanced budget for FY 9 1 

1. Obtain tundingtotH- pnvatx^c aor: 
Suggestions: 

Jewett Foundation lor Citv Sue (pending) $5,000 

Bank of America - apply in Dec. '91 for 1992 $2,500 

Increase revenue from use of the gallery for receptions $1 ,000 

Printing by xerox for 2 announcements $1 ,000 

ortobtain one ui-kind donation +$9,500 

1 a.i s ut one indoor show $4,650 

Postpone City Site Spring Show , seek outside funding $6,500 

Total -$11,150 

Advantages. 
Savings 
Dis advantages 

Suggests Festival 2000, and liability tor cancelled contracts 
Disastrous public relations problem „ l I 

Z. a. Cut one show l kee ^ eo^^er ^LSUJc - < $4 ' 650) t^ 

Offer exhibition opportumty to local arts organization 
who can pay the above line items $ 4,650 

who would he selected 
from an advertised call for applications. 
Organizations such as: 
Galeria de la Raza 
Neighborhood .Arts Center 
Women's Caucus for Arts 
' >pen Studios/SF 
Artists' Societies 
PaintbrushDipIomacy 
CappStreet 
Headlands Center for the Arts 

3. b. Cut printing costs for all shows: 

Print on uncoated stock, one color, printing 

by City's Reproduction Bureau 

Savings of $500/show x 5 shows $2.500 

$2,450) 

4. Cut two shows - indoors ($9,300) 
Make Gallery available on rental basis for exhibitions -i '???? 



Long Ramie Funding Suppou 

I Increase Support from City General Funds $10 000 

Advantages 

• Operating funds are the most 

difficult monies to i"aise through CAC and Private 
foundations 

• Increasing the City's support, makes die Gallery s 



Arf> n/«/» Tiers,, .& \flll p 



piogram funding grants more attractive to outside funders. 
Disadvantages 

• Support through Cit> funds has been reduced by 34%/year 
since FY 89 

• City geaeral funds arc not available in the forseeable future. 

2. Change pool of artists from Bay Area to national 

•Gallery would quality forNFA Visual Arts Organization Gram 

• Change of policy - reduction of exhibit opportunities for Bay 
Area artists 

3. Charge admission tothegallery, e g., $1'person 

•Immediate source of income $5,000 

• ( .oss of accessibility to wider community 

? How many from current audience would not pay to see the exhibits. 

4. Create Gallery Membership 

•Requiresplanmng, management, provision of benelits per 
catagory of membership. 

• Requires staff 

5 Seek grant lor San Francisco Foundation for Development Consultant 
to advise on long range funding for the Gallery. 

6. Offer City Site commissions only when funding is assured by outside grants. 

• Seek renewal of LEF grant ($7,500) 

•Apply for NEA Forums Grant for 1 992 projects 

7. Pay to be on mailing list 

•2,000 (&> $5.00 each =$10,000. 

• Increases clerical work 

• May decrease mailing list. 

8. Increase Slide Registry Fees 

• Increase from current $ 1 0. 00 to $25. 00/year 

• M ay req uire increase of services 

• May decrease number of participants. 

• Requires increased clerical assistance; tncreasefees may only cover clerical costs. 

9 rVomote and book gallery for private receptions: increase donations for usage 

• Could genertate needed operating funds. 

• Requires staff topromote and manage bookings and supervise receptions. 
•User to pay for liability insurance, 5 security staff, set-up & clean-up time 

• Current fee for use 300-450/event; gallery stall has given overtime to 
supervise the events. 

• C>alJery staff offices and exhibitions at risk for theft and damage 

• Gallery has one utility sink and one toilet. Health Department may not permit catering 
public use. Facilities may need to be improve 

10 Kxpand usage policy to a rental policy 

•Generate income from renters such as individuals, fundraising projects, political, 
religious and commencal enterprises 

• Cannot discriminate as to purpose of function. 

• Artists may wish to withdraw works Irom functions whose purpose they do not support 

• Artists may require a rental fee for use of their work. 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



TO : 



ftyM^J^&MTB 



MEMO 

AIRPORT ART STEERING COMMITTEE 
MARGIE O'DRISCOLL 
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
PUBLIC ART STAFF 
COLLECTIONS MANAGER 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



FROM : 



RE: 
PROCEDURES 



SUSAN PONTIOUS 

DRAFT OF NEW DEACCESSION1NG POLICY AND 



COMMISSIONERS 

Baibaia Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boa! 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 

St. it iley Elchelbaum 

Kim Fowler 

Daniel Genera 

Anne Healy 

John Krlken 

Robert F. LaRocca 

Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 

Ral Y. Okamoto 

Dodle Rosekrans 



+> 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 




History: At the first meeting of the Airport Art 
Steering Committee, I was asked to draft deaccessioning 
guidelines for the airport art collection. As I began 
to undertake this task, it seemed to me that rather than 
write something just for the airport, I should draft 
general guidelines that would apply to all the artwork 
under the Arts Commission's jurisdiction, and then, if 
special conditions applied to the airport, incorporate 
them as an addendum. 

Existing Policy: The Arts Commission has an existing 
deaccessioning policy adopted in 1983. The means by 
which the Commission can dispose of a work of art 
through public auction or private sale, and the 
allowable uses of the funds obtained in this manner, are 
dictated by San Francisco Administrative Code Section 
1.16. Both the Commission's existing policy and the 
provisions of the Administrative Code are incorporated 
in this current policy draft. 

Review of Policies and Guidelines from Other Cities: 

With the help of Jodi Moise, one of our interns, I 
collected and reviewed policies from cities all over the 
country including, Portland, Sacramento, Seattle, 
Carlsbad, Phoenix, Miami, Dallas, and the State of 
Cal i f orn i a . 

Additional Provisions: In general, what I have done is 
incorporate provisions or language in the policies of 
other cities that I thought would be desirable to 
include in our own. In addition, recent events 
relative to the Irwin sculpture prompted me to address 
emergency removal and provisions under the California 
Art Preservation Act. 

Action: This is a working draft, in need of review and 
revision. I would like the Arts Commissioners and staff 
to review it in terms of overall Arts Commission policy, 
and the Airport. Art Steering Committee to review it 



relative to any additional provisions 
airport collection. 



,ropriate to the 



QoUtXi* ArAofWl (1ST3 



r 



W 



E, DEACCESSION 



In considering deaccession, the Arts Commission must be 
v-are of its role as trustee of the collections for the benefit 
: the public. Objects are acquired for permanent retention and 
>t with the thought of quick disposal. However, when it is 
?emed prudent to do so, deaccessioning may be considered. 

In considering various alternatives for the disposition of 
^accessioned objects, the Art Commission should be concerned 
lat : 

1. The manner of disposition is in the best interests of 
the Commission and the public it serves, 

2. Preference should be given to retaining works that are 
are a part of the historical, cultural, or scientific 
heritage of San Francisco and California. 

3. Consideration should be given to placing the art objects, 
through gift, exchange, or sale, in another tax-exempt 
public institution wherein they may serve the purpose 
for which they were acquired inititally by the 
Commission . 

P4. Objects should not be given or sold privately to 
City employees, officers, members of the governing 
authority, or to their representatives except as 
specified below. 

On occasion there are instances when a marginally 
gnifican art work has deteriorated to such an extent that it is 
iexhibitable and unrepairable and has consequently lost most of 
s art historical function. Once a work of this nature has been 
lly deaccessioned it may be the decision to physically destroy 

Sales or exchange of collections objects must also conform 
th the requirements of Section 1.16 of the San Francisco 
ninistrative Code, as enunciated below: 

1. When the Commission determines that it would be 
•antageous to the City, a work of art under the jurisdiction of 
Arts Commission may be sold or exchanged. The Commission may 
cute and accept all deeds of conveyance necessary and proper 
effect a duly authorized sale or exchange. A work of art to 
sold or exchanged shall be catalogued, listed and described 
h reasonable certainty and a copy of such catalogue be 
nished to the purchaser of supplies. 

^ : 



2. The Arts Commission may exchange a work of art on such 

terms as the Arts Commission, by a 2/3 vote of the members of the 

Commission determines appropriate, provided that any exchange is 

subject to the approval of the purchaser of supplies. 



A work of art under the jurisdiction of the Commission 
;old at public auction to the highest and best bidder and 
lission may contract with a licensed auctioneer for the 
of conducting the sale or sales. The contract shall 



3. A work of art under the jurisdiction of the Commission 
may be so n ' 
the Commi 

pUrpOSe O*. uuuuutLUlH LUC 3 a J. c wi. o u j. v- w ■ .!.♦.»- w*-**w»~*w- 

specify the compensation to be paid for the auctioneer's services 
and set forth the terms and conditions under which the sale or 
sales are to be conducted. Each such contract shall be approved 
by the purchaser of supplies. 

4. A work of art under the jurisdiction of the Commission 
may be sold by private sale under the following circumstances: 

(a) if the work is offered at public auction and no bids 
are received, or if the bids are rejected or 

(b) if the Arts Commission determines, by a 2/3 vote of the 
members that the work may be sold on terms more 
advantageous to the City if sold through private sale. Any 
contract for the private sale of a work of art is subject 
to the approval of the Purchaser. A work of art on which 
bids have been rejected shall not therafter be sold through 
private sale for less than the amount of the highest bid 
received . 

Before disposing of any objects from the collections, 
reasonable efforts should be made to ascertain that the 
Commission is legally free to do so. Where restrictions as to 
use or disposition of the objects in question are found to apply, 
the Arts Commission should comply with the following: 

1. Mandatory restrictions should be observed strictly unless 
deviation from their terms is authorized by a court of 
competent jurisdiction. 

2. Objects to which precatory restrictions apply should not 
be disposed of until reasonable efforts are made to 
comply with the restrictive conditions. If practical 
and reasonable to do so, considering the value of the 
objects in question, the Commission should notify the 
donor if it intends to dispose of such objects within 
ten years of receiving the gift or within the donor's 
lifetime, whichever is less. 

3. If there is any question as to the intent or force of 
restrictions, the Commission should seek the advice of 
the City Attorney. 

15 



4. An adequate record of the conditions and circumstances 
under which objects are deaccessioned and disposed of 
should be made and retained as part of the Collections 
Management records. 

5. Prior to disposition of any object having a value of 
$2,000 or more, two independent appraisals must be 
obtained . 

6. The Commission will abide by the California Resale 
Royalties Act with respect to notification and payment of 
the Artist . 

The Arts Commission shall deaccession and dispose of works 
of art .in its collections only in the public interest and as a 
means of improving the quality of the collections. Thus, in 
accordance with Section 10.117-1 of the San Francisco 
Administrative Code, all proceeds from any sale or auction shall 
be credited to the public art media fund. The monies in this 
Fund are for the exclusive purpose of acquiring or maintianing 
one or more other works of art for the same public structure or 
purpose for which the original work of art was acquired. 



16 



iJ 



DEACCESSIONING POLICY AND PROCEDURES 
DRAFT - 5/30/91 

OBJECTIVES : 

J. To establish an orderly process for reviewing the 
status of public artworks. 

II. To establish a procedure for removal of public works of 
art . 

DEFINITIONS: 

De accessioning is defined as the procedure for the removal 
of an artwork from public exhibition through disposition, 
and includes gifts, sales, exchanges and any other 
transactions by which title of outgoing works of art are 
transferred from the collections to another institution or 
individual, as well as disposal by intentional destruction. 
Outlined below are the policies and procedures employed by 
the San Francisco Arts Commission to dispose of a work of 
art in its collection. 

ELIGIBLE WORKS OF ART: 

All artworks owned by the City and County of San Francisco 
under the juristiction of the San Francisco Arts Commission, 
whether acquired through Art Enrichment Program, donation, 
or any other method. 

OVERVIEW OF ACQUISITION POLICY: 

Acquisitions should be directed towards works of art of the 
highest quality. Acquisition by the City and County of San 
Francisco implies a commitment to the preservation, 
protection and display of the artwork for the public 
benef it . 

Acquisition should imply permanency within the collection, 
as long as the work maintains its physical integrity, 
identity and authenticity, arid as long as it remains useful 
to the purposes of the people of the City and County of San 
Francisco. When these conditions no longer prevail, the 
Arts Commission may consider removal from public display 
and/or deaccess ion ing . 

REMOVAL OF ARTWORK FROM PUBLIC DISPLAY: 

T . Gene ra 1 

While the intent of acquisition is for permanency 
public display, circumstances and/or conditions may 
arise that make it prudent for- the Commission, on 



SFDEACC Page - 1 



behalf of the public interest, to remove an artwork 
from public display. 

The conditions and process under which the Commission 
would consider removal of an artwork from display are 
listed under the " Condi tions " section below. The 
Commission has the following options for artwork it has 
decided to remove from display: 

III. Options 

A. Relocation of Public Display: 

If the Commission decides that an artwork must be 
removed from its original site, and if its 
condition is such that it could be re- instal led , 
the Commission will attempt to identify another 
appropriate site. [f the object was designed for 
a specific site, relocation must be to a new sit'' 
consistent with the artist's intention, and the 
artist's advice assistance will be requested to 
help make this determination. 

B. Store object 

C. Sale or Trade of Object 

III. Provisions for Emergency Removal 

In the event that the structural integrity or condition 
of an artwork is such that, in the opinion of the Art 
Commission's Director of Cultural Affairs, the artwork 
presents an eminent threat to public safety, the 
Director may authorize its immediate removal, without 
Commission action or the artist's consent, and have the 
work placed in temporary storage. The artist and the 
Arts Commissioners must be notified of this action 
within 30 days. The Commission will then consider 
options for disposition: repair, reinstallation, 
maintenance provisions or deaccessioning . 

In the event that the artwork cannot be removed without 
being irreparably damaged or destroyed, and if the 
Artist in his Agreement with the City and County has 
not waived his/her rights under the California Art 
Preservation Act in these circumstance, the Director- 
must attempt to gain such written permission before 
proceeding. In the event that this cannot be 
accomplished before action is required in order to 
protect the public health and safety, the Director will 
proceed according to the advice of the City Attorney. 



SFDEACC Page 



w 



DEACCESSIONING: STATEMENT OF GENERAL POLICY 

The Arts Commission shall deaccession and dispose of works 
of art in its collections only in the public interest and as 
a means of improving the quality of the collections. Thus, 
in accordance with Section 10.117-1 of the San Francisco 
Administrative Code, all proceeds from any sale or auction, 
less any payment due the artist under the California Resale 
Royalties Act, shall be credited to the public art media 
fund. The monies of this Fund are for the exclusive purpose 
of acquiring or maintaining one or more other works of art 
for the same public structure or purpose for which the 
original work of art was acquired. 

Because the disposal of artworks may have serious 
implications for the artist, the community, and the cultural 
heritage of San Francisco, deaccessioning should be a 
deliberate and seldom used procedure. Therefore, it is not 
the policy of the City and County to dispose of works simply 
because they are not currently in fashion, or whose worth 
might not yet be recognized. Deaccessioning procedures will 
be instituted ONLY after a careful and impartial evaluation 
of the object in question within the context of the entire 
col lection . 

In considering various alternatives for the disposition of 
deaccess ioned objects, the Arts Commission should be 
concerned that: 

I. The manner of disposition is in the best interests of 
the Commission and the public it serves. 

[I. Preference should be given to retaining works that are 
a part of the historical, cultural, or scientific 
heritage of San Francisco and California. 

III. Consideration should be given to placing the art 
objects, through gift, exchange, or sale, in another 
tax-exempt public institution wherein they may serve 
the pur-pose for which they were acquired initially by 
t lie Commi ssi on . 

IV. Objects may not be given or sold privately to City 
employees, officers, members of t lie governing 
authority, or to their representatives, except as 
specified below. 



SFDEACC Page 



RAMIFICATIONS 

I. Any decision to deaccession can effect the SF Arts 
Commissions' ability to commission other works of art. 
Consideration should be given to the effects on the 
artist's career, other works in the collection by that 
artist and the Arts Commission's working relationship 
with the artist. ( PorLland) 

II. The decision to deaccession may implicate basic 
questions of public trust, freedom of artistic 
expression, censorship, contractual obligations, 
copyright, moral rights and integrity of the artwork. 
(Phoenix ) 

CONDITIONS: 

A work of art may be considered for removal from public 
display and deaccessioning if one or more of the following 
conditions apply. 

I. The work presents a threat to public safety 

II. Condition or security of the work cannot be 
guaranteed, or the Commission cannot properly care 
or store the work. 

III. The work requires excessive or unreasonable 
maintenance, or has faults in design or 
workmansh ip 

IV. The condition of the work requires 
restoration in gross excess of its aesthetic 
value, or is in such a deteriorated state that 
restoration would prove either unfeasible, 
impractical or misleading. 

V. No suitable site for the work is available, or 
significant changes in the use or character of 
design of the site affect the integrity of the 
work . 

VI. The work interferes with the operations of the 
client agency. 

VII. Significant adverse public reaction over an 
extended period of time (5 years or more). 



SFDKACC Page - 4 



VIII. The work is judged to have little or no aesthetic 
and/or historical or cultural value. 

tX. Arts Commission wishes to replace a work with a 
more appropriate work by the same artist, 

X. The work can be sold to finance, or can be traded 
for, a work of greater importance. 

XI. Written request from the artist has been received 
to remove the work from public display. 

XII. The work is duplicative in a large holding of work 
of that type or of that artist. 

XIII. The work is fraudulent or not authentic 

XIV. The work is not, or is rarely displayed 

XV. The work can be used to finance, or can be traded 
for a work of greater importance 

PROCESS: 

In general, no work of art will be deaccessioned within 10 
years after acquisition. (Note: Seattle, Sacramento, CA 
Arts Council: permanent acqu i s i tons- 1 yrs from date of 
i nstallat ion/5 yrs for acceptance of portable works) 

Every 5 years, the Public Art Collection should be evaluated 
by the Visual Arts Committee. The committee shall act as 
the panel, or name an independent qualified panel to review 
works designated for deaccess i oni ng consideration. (See 
Conditions Below) (General consensus: 5 yrs/Dallas 10 yrs) 

The following steps shall be followed for works being 
considered for deaccessioning: 

I. The Collection's Manager must prepare a report that 
indicates: 

A. The opinion of the City Attorney regarding any 
restrictions which may apply to a specific work 

B. An analysis of the reasons for deaccessioning and 
its impact on the collection and the artist. 

C . Staff evaluation of the artwork 



SFDEACC 



Page 



D. Public and agency feedback on the work in question 

E. Provide Lhe opinions of 2 or more independent 
professionals qualified to recommend on the 
concern prompting review (conservators, engineers, 
architects, critics, safety experts etc.) 

F. Provide written correspondence, press and other 
evidence of publ ie debate 

G. Options for disposition 

H. Acquisition method and purchase price 

I. Current market appraisal for sale purposes 
( Portland) 

J. Replacement Costs 

II. Deaccessioning proceedings will be considered by the 
Visual Arts Committee. Proceedings shall be open to 
the public as part of the Committee's regular or 
special meeting. 

The Committee shall make its recommendation to the San 
Francisco Arts Commission for approval by resolution. 

III. If the Commission determines that it would be 
advantageous to the City, a work of art under its 
juristiction may be sold or exchanged. The Commission 
may execute and accept all deeds of conveyance 
necessary and proper to effect a duly authorized sale 
or exchange. A work of art to be sold or exchanged 
shall be cataloged, listed and described with 
reasonable certainty and a copy of such catalogue be 
furnished to the Purchaser. 

IV. The Arts Commission may exchange a work of art on such 
terms as the Arts Commission, by a 2/3 vote of the 
members of the Commission determines appropriate, 
provided that any exchange is subject to the approval 
of the Purchaser. 

V. A work of art under the jurisdiction of the Commission 
may be sold at public auction to the highest and best 
bidder and the Commission may contract with a licensed 
auctioneer for the purpose of conducting the sale or 
sales. The contract shall specify the compensation to 



SFDEACC Page - 6 



■ i 



be paid for the auctioneer's services and set forth the 
terms and conditions under which the sale or sales are 
to be conducted. Each such contract shall be approved 
by the Purchaser. 

VI. A work of art under the jurisdiction of the Commission 
may be sold by private sale under the following 
circumstances : 

A. If the work is offered at public auction and no 
bids are received, or if the bids are rejected, or 

B. If the Arts Commission determines, by a 2/3 vote 
of the members that the work may be sold on terms 
more advantageous to the City if sold through 
private sale. Any contract for the private sale 
of a work of art is subject to the approval of the 
Purchaser. A work of art on which bids have been 
rejected shall not thereafter be sold through 
private sale for less than the amount of the 
highest bid received. 

No te : Some cities give first option for the purchase 
or trade of the artwork to the artist (at current 
market price? ) . 

VII. Before disposing of any objects from the collections, 
reasonable efforts should be made to ascertain that the 
Commission is legally free to do so. Where 
restrictions as to the use or disposition of the 
objects in question are found to apply, the Arts 
Commission should comply with the following: 

A. Mandatory restrictions should be observed strictly 
unless deviation from their terms is authorized by 
a court of competent jurisdiction. 

B. Objects to which precatory restrictions apply 
should not be disposed of until reasonable efforts 
are made to comply with the restrictive 
conditions. If practical and reasonable to do so, 
considering the value of the objects in question, 
the Commission should notify the donor if it 
intends to dispose of such objects within ten 
years of receiving the gift or within the donor's 
lifetime, whichever- is less. 



SFDF.ACC Page 



C. If there is any question as to the intent of force 
of restrictions, the Commission should seek the 
advice of the City Attorney. 

D. An adequate record of the conditions and 
circumstances under which objects are 
deaccessioned and disposed of should be made and 
retained as part of the Collections Management 
records . 

E. Prior to disposition of any object having a value 
of $2,000 or more, two independent appraisals must 
be obtained. 

F. The Commission will abide by the California Resale 
Royalties Act with respect to notification and 
payment of the Artist: five percent (5%) of the 
sale price of any work valued over $1,000.00 will 
be given to the artist who created the work, 
provided that the artist can be located by 
reasonable means. If the artist cannot be found, 
the Resale Royalty will revert to the City and 
County of San Francisco Arts Commission. 

( Sacramento ) 

ALTERATION, MODIFICATION, OR DESTRUCTION OF ARTWORK: 

I . General Policy 

It is the primary responsibility of the Art Commission 
to preserve and protect the collections under its 
management for the people of the City and County of San 
Francisco. However, under certain conditions, and in 
accordance to the constraints of the California Art 
Preservation Act, the Commission may authorize actions 
that would alter, modify or destroy an artwork. 

In the event that the condition of the artwork 
represents an eminent safety hazard, and cannot be 
removed without risk of damage or destruction, the 
Director of Cultural Affairs will proceed in accordance 
with the provisions specified under "Emergency 
Removal " . 

I I . Summary of California Preservation Act 

The California Preservation Act (Civil Code 987) 
provides artists with two major rights: The "right 
of integrity", which empowers the artist to sue to 
prevent the deliberate physical alteration or 
destruction of an object, or where the object has 



SFDEACC Page - 8 



r 

w already suffered injury, to recover monetary damages, 

and the "right of authorship", which protects the 
artist's right of ownership to claim or disclaim an 
object if significant alterations have eliminated the 
option of restoring the work to its original state. 

These rights can be waived only if the artist executes 
a signed writing expressly so agreeing. It does not 
matter whether the particular work of art was created 
before or after these laws went into effect, and the 
provisions are in effect for 50 years after the 
artist's death. 

This act applies only to original paintings, 
sculptures, drawings or works of art in glass deemed to 
be of "recognized quality". In determining quality, 
the courts handle each situation independently, and 
rely on the recommendations of arts professionals. 

In situations where works of art are an integral 
component of a building , and cannot be removed from a 
building without suffering substantial injury , Section 
h(l) makes special provisions. The law affords the 
artist no protected "right of integrity " unless the 
owner has both signed and recorded with the county a 
letter of agreement expressly reserving that right to 
the art ist . 

III. Condi t ions 

Removal and disposal of an artwork, art place or 
applied art concept may be considered under the 
following circumstances: 

A. The work has faults of design or workmanship, or 
is damaged so that repair or remedy is 
impractical , unfeasible or an unjustifiable 
allocation of resources. 

B. Work poses a threat to public safety, or in some 
other way poses a potential liability for the City 
and County of San Francisco. 

C. The Commission deems it necessary in order for the 
City and County to exercise its responsibilities 
in regard to public works and improvements, or in 
furtherance of the City's operations , or for any 
other good cause. 



SFDEACC Page 



1 V . Opt ions : 

If, for any of the above reasons, the City and County 
find it necessary pursue plans that would modify, 
remove, destroy or in any way alter an artwork, 
artplace, or applied art concept, arid the Arts 
Commission approves such action, then the Arts 
Commission shall make a reasonable effort to notify the 
artist by registered mail of the City's intent and 
out] i ne possible opt ions: 

A. Transfer of Title to the Artist 

The artist will be given the first option of 
having the title to the artwork transferred to 
him/her. If the artist elects to pursue title 
transfer, he/she is responsible for the object's 
removal and all associated costs. 

B. Disclaim Authorship 

In the case where the City contemplates action 
which would compromise the integrity of the 
artwork, the artist shall be given the opportunity 
to disclaim authorship and request that his/her 
name not be used in connection with the given work 

C. Removal and Destruction: 

If destrucl ion is of an artwork protected under 
Civil ("ode 987 is contemplated, the Commission 
must secure a written waiver of the artist's 
rights under this section. In the case of 
emergency removal that may result in destruction 
or irreparable damage, the Director- will act in 
accordance with the advice of the City Attorney. 

If the Commission's efforts to contact the artist are' 
unsuccessful, the City shall proceed with its plans. 



SFUFACC 



Page - Id 



City and County 
of San Francisco 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



FROM: 






DATE: 6/19/91 

TO: Visual Arts Committee 



Susan Pontious 



RE: 



Main Library Project Update: 
Aycock re-design. 



Baumgarten Fees: 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 



Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
Dodie Rosekrans 

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



Baumgarten Fees: The Arts Commission has authorized a 
fee of 885,000 for Lothar Baumgarten for Design 
Development and implementation of his concepts for the 
main library. (This would make his total fees for all 
phases of the project 8100,000). The artist had 
originally requested 8200,000. At the direction of the 
Commission, staff wrote to the artist with the 
Commission's offer and explained the reasons why we 
could not offer what he had requested. We received no 
reply to this letter. 

On June 12th, Jill Manton and I met with the artist here 
in San Francisco and discussed his fees at length. The 
artist has not accepted the Commission's offer and made 
the following points: 

1. His standard fees are between S150,000 - 8250,000. 
His projects have all been for other non-profit 
institutions like museums. 

2. For the fee he proposes he is offering 5 different 
projects that carry the same theme throughout the 

1 ibrary . 

3. His work is very precise, involving exacting 
mathematical calculations. The architects' various 
redesigns have already forced him to redo his work 
several times. 

4. He in intimately involved in all phases of 
implementation, overseeing all details. If 
necessary, he fabricates himself to insure that the 
work is up to his standards. 

Staff agreed to make the Committee aware of these facts, 
and to ask the Committee if they wanted to reconsider 
the fee range for this artist. We also asked Lothar to 
consider whether or not he would consider doing perhaps 
only one or two of the proposed if the Commission would 
not increase his fees. 




r 

%r Alice Aycock: Alice and the architects are lookii 

designing two spiral stairways; one that goes from the 
glass reading room down to the next floor, and one from 
that floor to the atrium. At this writing, the 
architects are discussing the inclusion of these 
stairways with the library. If approved (an answer is 
expected before the June 26th VAC meeting) by the 
library, then the artist will proceed with design. Her 
proposal would be presented at the July 31st VAC 
meeting . 

We need a second extension of her contract through 
August 31st to accommodate this work. 



"1 



City and County 
of San Francisco 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



RE: 



fv\&v\JV- _ire**v_ yjl. 



DATE: June 20, 1991 

TO: Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Susan Pontious 



Mental Health Facility: Proposed 
collaboration between Hilda Shum and Lisa Lee 
for design and painting of day room columns. 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Rai Y. Okamoto 
Dodle Rosekrans 

. i 

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



Background: At the February Visual Arts Committee 
meeting, the Committee approved the conceptual plan for 
the interior of the facility. One of the components of 
this plan called for painting the columns in the day 
rooms (2 for each room, 16 in all). Hilda Shum would 
take responsibility for directing this work with 
assistants as necessary. 

Since then, Hilda has identified another painter, Lisa 
Lee, with whom she would like to work. The two have 
decided on four major themes for the columns -- fish, 
clouds, flowers, and water -- and plan to have final 
designs for the July meeting. Hilda will be paying Lisa 
Lee's fees out of her honorarium. 

Committee Action: At the June 26th VAC meeting, I will 
show slides of Lisa Lee's work for the information of 
the Committee. I don't believe Committee action is 
required at this time, unless the Committee has serious 
problems with the participation of Ms. Lee in the 
project . 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 




T2SHT 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(416)554-9671 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowter 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
Dodle Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9662 



MINUTES TO AIRPORT ART STEERING COMMITTEE 
JUNE 6, 1991 

Airport Art Master Plan 

A. Role of Committee 

The committee reviewed an expanded version of 
the "Airport Art Steering Committee Purpose, 
Goals and Objectives", which listed in 
greater detail the Committee's role in 
developing the Airport Art Master Plan. The 
Committee added "Review of the sites for 
proposed artworks" and "Review of the standard 
artist contract" to the Committee's 
object i ves . 

R . Review of Artistic Direction 

The Committee reviewed a preliminary analysis 
of the environment for art at the airport, the 
recommended artistic direction for the future, 
and the objectives for the Art Master Plan for 
the new terminal. 

The Committee was in general agreement with 
these recommendations, with the exception that 
the commissioning of temporary works shoLtld 
remain the purview of the Airport's Fine Arts 
Hit reau . 

C . Role of Artists and other consultants in 
Master Plan : 

It was the consensus of the Committee that one 
artist would be selected to work with the 
Committee and the project architects to 
identify areas of artist involvement in the 
new terminal . 

The Committee did not want to involve a group 
of artists in a symposium developed around the 
issue of art. at the airport. 

D . Ti me 1 i ne : 

Jason Yuen reported that the Environmental 
Impact Report would be distributed on July 
11th. In August he will request that the 
Airport Commission approve the hiring of the 
project architects and other- consultants. 




It was agreed that at the next meeting, the 
Committee will review applicants for the 
artist consultant to help develop the art 
mas terplan . 

II. Deaccessioning Policies 

The Committee reviewed the draft of the revised 
"Deaccessioning Policy and Guidelines" developed 
for the Commission by Susan Pontious. They did not 
identify any additional provisions relative to the 
airport. Susan said that she would be asking the 
Visual Arts Committee to consider this revised 
document for adoption at their June 26th meeting. 



III. Irwin Sculpture 

Susan Pontious reported that a letter had been sent 
to Robert Irwin regarding his wishes relative to 
the dispensation of the dam|aged airport sculptures. 
If the sculptures are to be disposed of, the Arts 
Commission would need a letter from his authorizing 
this ac t ion . 

Based on his response, the matter will be 
considered by the Visual Arts Committee at their 
June 26th meeting and sent to the full Commission 
for resolution on July 1st. 

IV. List of Artworks in Collection Currently not on 
Display : 

As per the Committee's request, a list was 
distributed of the artworks commissioned or 
purchased for the Airport that are currently in 
storage or on loan. 

V. Minutes from April 4, 1991 

Bill Coblentz moved for adoption of the April 4 
minutes. Jason Yuen seconded. The minutes were 
approved . 

VI. Next Meeting and Agenda 

It was agreed that the next meeting would be on 
Thursday, July 25th, at 9 a.m. At that meeting the 
Committee will consider the consultant applicants 
and the issue of the Freda Koblick sculpture. 



airport/ junmin 



Page 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. C A 94102 

(415)554-9671 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



AIRPORT ART STEERING COMMITTEE: 
Purpose, Goals, and Objectives 

Revised: June 6, 1991 

PURPOSE: The purpose of the Airport Art Steering 
Committee is to develop policy and make program 
recommendations for the Art Enrichment Program at the 
San Francisco International Airport. The scope of the 
committee's purview includes both the existing 
collection and new art enrichment projects. Steering 
Committee recommendations must be formally approved by 
the full Airport and Arts Commissions. 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
Dodle Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



GOAhS: To promote an art enrichment program for the 
airport that meets the following criteria: 



1 . 



-1 . 



Results in an art program/collection of the highest 

aesthetic standards 

Provides enjoyment for the airport visitor 

Functions within the airports' operational 

requ i rements 

Enhances the national and international prestige of 

SFO and the City and County of San Francisco 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



OBJECTIVES: 

1. To develop policy and program procedure guidelines 
relative to the permanent art collection at the San 
Francisco International Airport. This includes, 
but is not limited to: 

a. Evaluation of existing collection 

b. Development of a de-accessioning policy and 
guidelines for the existing collection. 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



c. Approve recommendations regarding works to be 
de-accessioned and/or re-sited. 

d. Approvcil of a maintenance schedule and annual 
budget re com mend a t i ons . 

2. To develop a master plan for the commissioning new 
works for the new proposed international terminal. 

a. To approve a planning budget and timeline 

b. To review and approve master planning 
objectives arid activities 

c. To approve hiring of consultants for- planning 
process . 




d. To approve language to be included in RFQ for 
architects regarding their interaction with 
artists for project 

e. To solicit involvement of additional staff 
and/or community members in planning as deemed 
appropriate . 

f. Review drafts of master plan and comment as 
necessary 

g. Review and approve recommended locations for 
siting of artwork. 

h. Review wording of standard artist contracts 
for commissioning work. 

i. Present and support adoption of all of the 
above to Airport and Arts Commission 

To oversee the commissioning of new works 

a. Review and approve project guidelines and 
budget 

b. Establish selection panels and procedures 

c. Review selection panel recommendations and 
recommend approval to respective commissions 

d. Review and approve artist proposals 

To promote and support Committee recommendations to 
Arts and Airport Commissions. 



AIRPORT ART MASTER PLAN: ARTISTIC DIRECTION 

Preliminary Analysis of Artistic Environment: SFIA is a 
dynamic environment that offers unique opportunities and 
challenges for a public art program. As an internat inal 
transportation center, it is a point of exchange for world 
cultures, and it is the first point of contact these 
visitors have with San Francisco and the Bay Area. 

One of the particular challenges a public art program must 
address here is that an airport is an ever-changing 
environment. The design of almost every aspect is dreven by 
some operation related to its function, and this physical 
plant frequently must be modified to respond to changes in 
operational needs. 

Historically, the Arts Commission has administered the 
program for permanant art acquisitions for SFIA. This 
acquisition program has focused on the commissioning of 
discreet sculptural pieces and 2-1) works, such as paintings, 
textiles, and ceramic wall murals. 

Undeniably, the art enrichment program has been responsible 
for commissioning some of the most significant artworks in 
the City and County's art collection. However, an analysis 
of the past approach also reveals some problems. These are 
as follows: 

1. Work often not suited to the operational realities of 
the airport, such as pedestrian traffic patterns and 
frequent redesign of space and/or changes in space 
usage . 

2. Traditional painting and sculpture require a neutral 
"museum" type setting and opportunity for contemplation 
to be best seen and appreciated. Often neither of 
these opportunities exist at the airport. 

3. Ongoing change at the airport often means the 
elimination of exhibit ion space, which requires removal 
and re-siting of the artwork. Often, another 
appropriate wall or floor space do not exist, 
necessitating either re-siting of the artwork in a less 
than optimum setting, storing, or deaccessing artwork. 

4. Conservation needs of these works have been 
underestimated and no budget exists for their ongoing 
care. 

5. While SFtA's permanent public art program was one of 
the first in the country, and has served as a model for 
other airports developing programs, newer programs have 
taken advantage of more innovative and inventive means 



for artistic involvment and may soon eclipse SFlA's 
prestige and standing in this area. 

Future Artistic Direction: 

In light of this analysis, 1 would suggest the following as 
a guideline to developing the art program for the new 
international terminal. 

1. Taking the operational needs and ever-changing 
environment of the airport as a "given", and develop a 
program that works in harmony with this reality. This 
approach would put greater emphasis on the following: 

a. Early involvment with the artists with the project 
architects so that work could be integrated into 
the architecture and/or architectural design and 
specifications could be developed to accomodate 
later artistic involvment. 

b. Look to commission works not so dependent on a 
neutral "art setting", video for instance, that 
can easily be more easily relocated if necessary. 

c. Identify areas less subject to usage change as 
sites for artwork. 

d . n n n i i i lrr i'I'ttiii 1 i 'i ' i m n i ng — a — serie 3 — e-f- — tempui aij — or 
tumpoi al — wuiks. 

e. Encourage artists to consider addressing 

environments or systems, (a la Denver's plan), not 
just s i tes . 

2. Place greater emphasis on work that more directly 
addresses the social and cultural environment of the 
airport, and more directly engages its intended 
audience . 

3. Consider multi-disciplinary approaches 

4. Look for opportunities for cooperation and possibility 
for shared resources w/Airport Exhibition Program. 



Objectives for Art Master Plan for New Terminal: 

The art enrichment master plan for the new terminal should 

contain the following: 

1. Mission and goals for airport program 

2. Analysis of the airport environment and identification 
of special conditions and problems. 



3. Identification of sites and opportunities for future 
artist involvement; outline of method and sequence of 
implementation . 

4. Develop criteria and guidelines for future commissions, 

5. Define scope of work of artists who will be 
commissioned for airport projects. 

6. Assemblage of materials and criteria regarding 
technical and operational matters. 

7. A preliminary multi-year budget. 



*1 



List of Artworks Currently In Storage/On Loan: 

1. Mark Adams Tapestries (on loan) 

2. Author Carraway painting (Bureau of Architecture) 

3. Judith Linaires painting (Jason's office) 

4. Freda Koblick sculpture (storage) 

5. Joyce Kozloff ceramic mural (storage) 

6. Bill Martin painting (Jason's office) 

7. Ben Tre sculpture (storage) 

Collection Manager's Recommendations for Deaccessioning : 

Martin, Carraway and Linaires 

Approach Ben Tre regarding the possibility of trading the 
sculpture we own for a more appropriate piece. If that's 
not possible, then deaccession. 




MINUTES 

Visual Arts Committee Meeting 

25 Van Ness Avenue June 26, 1991 

Suite 240 3pm 

San Francisco. CA 94102 „ r ' ' ,, 

(415)5549671 ^ Van Ness, Suite 70 



The Meeting was called to order at 4:30 p.m. 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



Commissioners Present: 

Anne Healy, (Chair) 
Barbara Sklar 
Robert LaRocca 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
'■nalia Mesa-Bains, Ph.D. 

■ L '. Okamoto 
: *"' 3 Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



Staff Present: 
Jill Manton 
Tonia Macneil 
Susan Pontious 

I. Approval of Minutes from May 22, 1991 

Commissioner Sklar moved to approve the 
Visual Arts Committee of May 22, 1991. 
LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 

II. Consent Calendar 

A. Motion to extend contract for conse 
from Jim Bernstein (Ct. #2890010) throng 

B. Motion to approve final payment of 
Bernstein for FEMA conservation contract 

C. Motion to approve extension of Alic 
contract for Main Library through August 

D. Motion to approve team and proposal 
Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and Roger Wh 
Center/Howard Street Art Enrichment Proj 



minutes of the 
Commi ss ioner 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 

Public Art Program amount not to exceed $6,000 per team. 

Street Artists Licenses 



E. Motion to approve request to increa 
for the Moscone Center/Howard Street art 



rvation report 

h August 31 , 1991 . 

$1 ,987.50 to Jim 
(CT. #2890004) 

e Aycock's design 
31, 1991 

concept of Daniel 
ite for Moscone 
ect . 

se maquette fees 
ist teams for an 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
'5-554-9682 



F. Motion to approve removal and dispo 
Irwin's sculptures, Black/White Ceremoni 
Asian Port of Entry, which sustained irr 
a result of the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthqu 
rocks incorporated in the sculptures wil 
such time as they can be incorporated in 
City (non-art) pro jet: t . 



sal of Robert 

al Gates, Pacific 

eparable damage as 
ake ; the 2 onyx 
1 be stored until 
to an appropriate 



L_^ 



VAC-MIN626. 9 1 -twin 



Page 



G . Motion to set July 31, 1991 as next regular meeting of 
the Visual Arts Committee. 

Commissioner Healy moved approval of the consent calendar. 
Commissioner Sklar seconded. The vote was unanimous. 

III. Art Enrichment: Fire Station #37 

Bruce Flynn of the Bureau of Architecture presented 3 
schematic concepts for the seismic upgrade and redesign of 
Fire Station #37 on Potrero Hill. The construction budget 
is $1.3 million, and the Art Enrichment budget would be 
$26,000. He asked for the Committee's guidance as to 
opportunities for art enrichment at the site. The sense 
of the Committee is that either of the three schemes would 
be workable for art enrichment and that an artist should 
work on the exterior public facades of the building. The 
project will be presented to the Civic Design Committee in 
July or August. 

TV. Art Enrichment: Fire Station #2 

Clyde Cohen, project manager, and Roger Wong, project 
architect, from the Bureau of Architecture, presented the 
schematic design and model for a new fire station at 
Powell Street in Chinatown. The budget for Art Enrichment 
will be $50,000. The presenters suggested that an artist 
might work on the glass surfaces of the bay windows, 
canopies and light fixtures. The Commission approved this 
concept and suggested that the canopies and light fixtures 
might also be treated as sculptural elements by the 
artist . 



V. Art Enrichment: Bayview Police Statio 
Jill Manton and Peter Wong from the Police 
presented the project to the Committee. $ 
allocated for the artwork. Artists will h 
opportunity to design projects for public 
building. Areas of focus will be the publ 
entry and the community meeting rooms. Th 
panel will consist of the Visual Arts Comm 
participation from the Police Department ( 
and Peter Wong from the Bureau of Architec 
artist/community member will be invited to 
the selection process as well. Jill Manto 
Sam or Dewey Crumpler as possible communit 
representatives. She noted that outreach 
community groups in the neighborhood. 



Department 
39,000 is 
ave the 

areas within the 
ic lobby, main 
e selection 
ittee with 
Lt . Suttmeier ) 
ture. A guest 

participate in 
n suggested Joe 

y 

has been done to 



VAC-MTN626. 91-twm 



Page 



VI. Mural Resource Center: 1250 Eddy Street 

Horace Washington and Anne Sherry will create a tile and 
paint mural in the courtyard of the building at 1250 Eddy 
Street. The theme is international plants, which will be 
painted on the ground floor walls to a height of 12'. 
Children from the Head Start Program in the building will 
create flower designs for inclusion in the mural. The 
project is scheduled to begin in the next two months. 
Commissioner Healy moved approval of the concept and 
design. Commissioner Sklar seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 

VII. Mural Resource Center: 24th Street at Balmy Alley 
Eduardo Pineda and Ray Patlan will create a mural on a 
100' long wall at 24th Street between Balmy Alley and 
Harrison. The mural will begin at 4 1/2', above a tile 
wall, and rise to a height of 11'. The mural is dedicated 
to children and is about children playing. Commissioner 
Healy moved approval of the concept and design and 
Commissioner Sklar seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 



VIII. Gallery: Exhibition for August 29-October 3 

Gallery Director Anne Meissner presented slides of the two 
artists proposed for two concurrent solo exhibitions 
beginning August 29. Rudgen Roldan will show bas-relief 
paintings in paint and wax dealing with her family and 
background. Robert Cataluschi will create a large-scale 
work using wood, translucent materials and projections. 
Commissioner Healy recommended that the artists be in 
separate rooms in order to mitigate the difference in 
scale, and moved to approve the artists for the August 29 
exhibition. Commissioner Sklar seconded. It was so 
moved . 

IX. Public Request: New Langton Arts 

Renny Pritikin of New Langton Arts and artists Bruce Tomb 
and John Randolph presented the artists proposal for a 
work of art to be installed in the gallery and on Folsom 
Street in October. The gallery has received a $10,000 NEA 
grant to fund the project, which is described as an 
acknowledgment of Folsom Street's "freeway" quality. 
Heavy metal construction plates will be laid on the street 
with pressure sensitive equipment and pneumatic pumps 
beneath. The action of cars crossing the plates will 
generate air pressure which will be stored to activate a 
sculpture within the gallery. The gallery and artists 
requested the Arts Commission's endorsement of the project 



VAC-MI N62b . 91 -twm Page 



s. 






and help in guiding them through the City approval 
process. The Commission urged the artists to address the 
possibility of danger to pedestrians and directed staff to 
help the artists with City approvals as possible. 
Commissioner Healy moved to endorse the project and 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 



X. Art Enrichment: Municipal Parking Garages 

Tonia Macneil presented the time line for the selection of 
artists for the Parking Garages and a list of potential 
panelists and alternates for the Selection Panel. The 
proposed panelists are: Peter Phau , Rebecca Solnit, Hung 
Liu, Peter Richards and John Woodall . Commissioner Healy 
recommended Martha Heavenston. Commissioner Sklar was 
appointed Committee liaison. The selection panelists 
will receive an honorarium of $75.00 per day for their 
time. Commissioner Healy moved approval of the Selection 
Panel, Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 

XI. Art Enrichment: Moscone Center/Howard Street 
Tonia Macneil requested that the Commission authorize the 
Director to enter into a design development contract with 
the team of Daniel Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and Roger 
White for the Moscone Center/Howard Street Art Enrichment 
project for an amount not to exceed $50,000. Commissioner 
Healy moved to approve the request, Commissioner LaRocca 
seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

XII. Art Enrichment: Bush-Polk Parking Garage 

Artist Bruce Hasson presented one of the completed panels 
for the grillwork for the Bush-Polk Parking Garage. All 
of the panels have been cast and the screens are in the 
process of fabrication. The Committee complemented him on 
the results. The artist requested that the panel approve 
the unpainted aluminum surface for the grillwork. He will 
conduct a test of the panels to determine whether sealing 
with a clear sealant will be necessary, and return to the 
committee to give a report. Commissioner LaRocca moved to 
approve the unpainted aluminum surface. Commissioner 
Sklar seconded. It was so moved. 

XIII. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero Promenade 

Jill Manton explained the three proposals which had been 
presented to the Selection Panel following a charette for 
the Embarcadero Promenade project. The Selection Panel 
recommended the team of Vito Acconci, Stanley Saitowitz 
and Barbara Stauffacher Solomon. The budget for the 



VAC-MIN626.91-twm Page 



design and implementation of the artwork on the South and 
North sections of the Promenade is $600,000. Funding for 
the middle section will be obtained from another source. 
During general discussion, the Commissioners noted 
problems presented by the tilt of the light fixtures and 
the troughs, and asked that these be addressed before 
granting final approval for implementation. Commissioner 
Healy moved to approve the team and conceptual proposal of 
Acconci, Saitowitz and Solomon, contingent upon resolution 
of financial, safety, construction and maintenance issues. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

XIV. Art Enrichment: Market Street 

Jill Manton asked the Committee to approve payment of 
$1500 to Earl Gee to create new designs for the Market 
Street Bus Shelters. Commissioner LaRocca made the 
motion, Commissioner Healy seconded. It was so moved. 

XV. Gallery: Fiscal Agent 

Anne Meissner informed the Committee of the Gallery's 
arrangement with Intersection for the Arts as fiscal agent 
and explained the consequences of the relationship. 

-A 10% fiscal agent fee will be taken for each grant 
received. This money cannot be taken from the grant 
itself, but must come from some other source. 

-The Gallery no longer has access to the non-profit 
bulk mail postage rate available through the former 
Friends of the Arts Commission. The new postage rate, for 
bulk mailing, is twice as expensive as previously. 

-All mail must now bear the return address of 
Intersec t ion . 

-Publicity for programs such as City-Site must now 
acknowledge the sponsorship of Intersection. 

-Funding sources will now view the Gallery as one of 
Intersection's sponsored projects, and will assess the 
Gallery's request in competition with other Intersection 
requests . 

Commissioners recommended that the Gallery's address be 
prominently displayed next to Intersection on all 
mail ings . 

XVT . Gallery: Budget and Programming 

Anne Meissner presented the Gallery's revised budget for 
1991-1992. She explained that the budget was severely 
constrained because the California Arts Counsel had denied 
the Gallery's request for $20,000 for the new fiscal year. 
This news was received in mid-June. The grant was denied 



VAC-MTN626 . 91-twm Page 



because the CAC panel felt that ongoing programming should 
be covered by municipal, rather than state funding. 

The budget has now been cut to a minimum. Artists will 
now receive only $400.00 as an honorarium. The printing 
budget is much lower, and the budget for the outdoor lot 
has been reduced from $9000.00 per project to $6,500.00. 
Expenses for 1991-1992 exceed income by $9,600.00. 

Discussion followed concerning ways and means of balancing 
the budget. Meissner stressed that the Gallery would 
continue to seek funding from private organizations. She 
presented a number of alternative solutions to the current 
crisis. Commissioners made several suggestions to 
increase revenues and decrease expenditures, including: 
-Hold an exhibition of Commission collection or public art 
projects . 

-Extend length of exhibitions, so that there are fewer 
exhibitions per year. 

-Use the City-Site lot at Christmas time as a Christmas 
Tree lot to auction off artist-designed Christmas trees. 
-Hold the Pops Concert Opening Night Reception at the 
Gallery, with proceeds contributed to the Gallery's 
overhead . 

XVII. Art Enrichment: Administrative Fees 

Jill Manton asked the Committee to approve an increase in 
the amount of administrative fees for 1990-1991 for Art 
Enrichment projects, pending authorization of the Board of 
Supervisors and permission of the respective project 
agencies. Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve an 
increase of from 10 to 20%. Commissioner Healy seconded 
the motion. It was so moved. 

XVIII. Collections: Pioneer Monument 

Molly Lambert, acting Collections Manager and Civic Design 
coordinator, reported on a recent informational 
presentation to the Planning Commission by the project 
architects of the New Main Library. She noted that the 
issue of ethnic insensi t ivi ty regarding the Pioneer 
Monument should be considered carefully in the discussion 
of options for moving the monument well before any action 
is taken by this Committee. 

XIX. Collections: Deaccessioning Policy 

Susan Pontious presented a draft of the new deaccessioning 
policy developed in response to the emergency removal of 



VAC-MTN626.91-twm Page 



the Robert Irwin sculpture at the San Francisco 
International Airport. She noted that the changes are 
additions to the existing policy. 

XX. Art Enrichment: Market Street Art in Transit 

Jun Jalbuena, subcontractor to the Market Street Art 
Master Plan team, requested that the Commission authorize 
staff to develop a separate contractual relationship with 
him with an extended deadline and additional funding. He 
explained that he had done much of the work on the project 
himself, and wished to continue working on the project 
separately from the team. Jill Manton explained that last 
week, after reviewing a draft of MP prepared by Jun, 
she expressed her willingness to work with Jun through the 
Delancy Cochran Contract, but explained that she as a 
representative of the Commission would have editorial 
control and that no time or financial charges could be 
made. Jun did not accept the conditions. The Committee 
acknowledged the hard work and diligence of Jun and stated 
that the Commission was not involved with his contract 
with the prime contractor. It was unfortunate that he did 
not receive a greater fee; but they could not authorize a 
new contract with Jun. The Committee did not approve the 
request . 

Commissioner LaRocca commented on the billboard proposals, 
remarking that he felt that responses to the billboards 
would be limited and that staff should consider use of 
newspaper, L.E.D. signs and subway posters as well. 

XXI. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero 

Jill Manton reported on a meeting between herself, Margie 
O'Driscoll and Rudy Nothenberg concerning funding for the 
Embarcadero Promenade project. The CAO agreed to a total 
art enrichment expenditure of $1.4 million, for the north 
and south segments of the Promenade and an administrative 
budget of $150,000. 



XXII. Art Enrichment: New Public Library 
Jill Manton and Susan Pontious reported on their 
discussions with Lothar Baumgarten about his fees for the 
project. After lengthy discussion, they asked the artist 
what he would be able to accomplish for the $100,000 fee. 
His reply has not yet been received. Susan Pontious 
passed on the request of Anne Hamilton to include her 
collaborator, Anne Chamberlain, as an equal partner in the 
next design contract. The Committee reminded Pontious 



VAC-MIN626. 91-twm Page 



that the reason for the current contractual relationship 
was to be sure that the creative input on the project came 
from Anne Hamilton, rather than both artists. The 
Committee denied the request. 

XXIII. Art Enrichment: Mental Health Facility 

Susan Pontious requested that Hilda Shum be able to work 
with a collaborator who would paint Shum's designs on the 
columns she has proposed for the Skilled Mental Health 
Facility. The Committee agreed to her request. 

XXIV. ADJOURNMENT 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:30 p.m. 



REPORTS AND ORDERS: 

1. Ordered: Approval of the May 22, 1991 minutes. 
Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vote; Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Approval to extend contract for 
conservation report from Jim Bernstein (CT. #2890010) 
through August 31, 1991. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

3. Ordered: Approval of final payment of $1,987.50 to 
Jim Bernstein for FEMA conservation contract (Ct. 
#2890004) 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: Approval of extension of Alice Aycock's 
design contract for main library through August 31, 1991. 
Move: Commisioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Approval of team and proposal concept of 
Daniel Martinez, Renee Petropoulos and Roger White for the 
Moscone Center/Howard Street Art Enrichment Program. 
Move: Commisioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: Approval of increase in maquette fees for 
the Moscone Center/Howard Street Project to an amount not 
to exceed $6,000 per team. 

Move: Commisioner Healy 



VAC-MIN626 . 91-twm Page - 



Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: Approval to remove and dispose of 
Robertlrwin ' s sculptures, Black/White Ceremonial Gates, 
Pacific Asian Port of Entry, which sustained irreparable 
damage as a result of the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake; the 
2 onyx rocks incorporated in the sculptures will be stored 
until such time as they can be incorporated into an 
appropriate City (non-art) project. 

Move: Commisioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

8. Approval of July 31, 1991 as the next regular meeting 
of the Visual Arts Committee. 

Move: Commisioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

9. Approval of mural proposal on the theme of 
international plants by Horace Washington and Anne Sherry 
for a paint and tile mural in the courtyard of the 
building at 1250 Eddy Street. 

Move: Commisioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

10. Approval of mural proposal by Eduardo Pineda and Ray 
Patlan for a mural dedicated to children at 24th Street 
between Balmy Alley and Harrison. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

11. Approval of artists Rudgen Roldan and Robert 
Cataluschi for concurrent solo exhibitions at the Arts 
Commission Gallery from August 29 to October 3, 1991. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

12. Endorsement of New Langton Arts project by artists 
Bruce Tomb and John Randolph. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

13. Approval of members and alternates of the Selection 
Panel for the 4 Municipal Parking Garages. The panelists 
are Peter Phau , Rebecca Solnit, Hung Liu, John Woodall, 
Peter Richards and Martha Heavenston and authorization to 
pay an honorarium of $75.00 per day to each panelist. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote : Unan i inous 



VAO-MTN626. 91 -twin Page - 9 



14. Authorization to the Director to enter into a design 
development contract with the artists Daniel Martinez, 
Renee Petropoulos and Roger White for the Moscone 
Center/Howard Street project for an amount not to exceed 
$50,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

15. Approval of the unpainted aluminum surface for the 
grill work at Bush-Polk Parking Garage, as requested by 
artist Bruce Hasson. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

16. Authorization of the team of Vito Acconci, Stanley 
Saitowitz and Barbara Stauf f acher-Solomon to create a work 
of art for the Embarcadero Promenade, for a total maximum 
project budget, inclusive of design and implementation, of 
$600,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

17. Approval of payment of $1,500.00 to artist Earl Gee 
for new poster designs for the Market Street bus shelters. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

18. Authorization to charge an art enrichment fee 
ranging from 10 to 20% for all 1990/1991 projects, pending 
authorization by the Board of Supervisors and permission 
from the respective project agencies involved. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN626.91-twm 



Page 



10 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 

„-illa Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
. Okamoto 
"^idle Rosekrans 



3 p.m. I 
3:05 II, 



- ,,,, 



AGENDA 

Visual Arts Committee 

July 31, 1991 

3 p.m. 

Approval of June 26th Minutes 

Consent Calendar 

A. Approval of progress payment of 
$1,500 to Jaap Bongers for 
completion of fabrication of artwork 
for Richmond Police Station. 

B. Approval of the site in front of 
City Hall currently occupied by the 
reflecting pools (scheduled for 
removal) as another possible 
relocation site to be considered for 
the Pioneer Monument. 

C. Approval to increase the honorariums 
for the Four Garages Selection 
Panelists by $15 each, for a total 
not to exceed $90 per panelist. 



L 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Drlscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
,c 5 Grove Street 
■ 554-9682 



3: 10 III 



3:40 IV, 



D. Approval of contract extension for 
Shelley Jurs (Richmond Police 
Station) to September 30, 1991. 

See Staff Report 

Embarcadero 

Jill Manton 

A. Historical & Interpretive Signage 
Project 

Michael Manwaring and Nancey Leigh 
Olmstead; Preliminary presentation 
of Design Concept 

B. Embarcadero Promenade: Status 
Report 

See Staff Report Enclosed 

San Andreas Water Treatment Plant #2 
Tonia Mcneil 



Presentation of final proposal by artists 
Tim Collins and Reiko Goto 

4:15 V. Gallery 

Ann Meissner and Tony Labat 

Proposal for "Faster Pussycat! Kill! 

Kill!" exhibit -- concept and artists. 

4:30 VI. Ellis-O'Farrell Garage 

Tonia Mcneil 

Selection of artist to create a design 

proposal for Ellis-O'Farrell Garage. 

See Staff Report Enclosed 

5:00 VII. Moscone/Howard St. 

Tonia Mcneil 

Review of artist's scope-of-work and 

payment schedule. 

See Staff Report Enclosed 

5:15 VIII. Market St. Master Plan 

Jill Manton 

A. Text and Design 

B. Seeding Projects 

a. photo series 

b. banner design 

See Staff Report Enclosed 

C. Letter from Paul Kos's Attorney 
Enclosed 

5:30 IX. Library 

Susan Pontious 

Response from Lothar Baumgarten regarding 
fee proposal and request for additional 
travel expenses 

Artist has agreed to do one major work 
for $85,000 fee offered, but wants 
additional travel money. 

5:40 X. Kezar Stadium 

Contract extension and modification 



5:45 XI. Firestation #2 
Susan Pontious 
Prospectus 

Enclosed for your information ; unless 
there are questions , no discussion 
necessary . 

5:50 XII. Committee Business 

A. Set standing meeting dates 

B. Mural Project Approvals: 
Recommendation for staff review 

5:55 XIII. Suzanne Lacey 

Request for Commission endorsement of 
Application to National Endowment for the 
Arts to support a book dealing with 
public art issues. 
See Project Description Enclosed 

6:05 XIV. Capp St. Project 

Request for Endorsement of Capp St. 
Project off-site installation at Justin 
Herman Plaza by Morrie Baden. 
Presenter: Susan Miller 
See Project Description , Enclosed 

6:15 Adjournment 



City and County 
of San Francisco 




MINUTES 
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

25 Van Ness Avenue JUL.Y 31 , 1991 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 _, 

(415)554-9671 * " e meeting was called to order at 3:10 p.m. 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



Commissioners Present: 
Anne Healy, Chair 
Nancy Boas 
Barbara Sklar 
Bob LaRocca 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heary 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
~ -1 Y. Okamoto 
die Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Staff Present: 

Joanne Chow Winship, Director 
Jill Man ton 
Tonia Macneil 
Susan Pontious 
Anne Me i ssner 

L Minutes for June 26, 1991 

Commissioner Sklar moved to approve the Committee minutes 
of June 26, 1991. Commissioner Boas seconded. It was so 
moved . 

II. Consent Calendar 

The following items were on the consent calendar: 

A. Approval of progress payment of $1,500 to Jaap 
Bongers for completion of fabrication of artwork for 
Richmond Police Station. 

B. Approval of the site in front of City Hall 
currently occupied by the reflecting pools (scheduled for 
removal) as another possible site to be considered for the 
Pioneer Monument. 

C. Approval to increase the honorariums for the 
Four Garages Selection Panelists by. $15 each, for a total 
not to exceed $90 per panelist. 

D. Approval of contract extension for Shelley Jurs 
(Richmond Police Station) to September 30, 1991. 

Commissioner Boas moved approval of the consent calendar. 
Commissioner Sklar seconded. It was so moved. 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



III. Embarcadero 

Jill Manton introduced Michael Manwaring, who presented 
the preliminary design concepts he has developed in 
teamwork with Nancy Leigh Olmstead for the Historical and 
Interpretive Signage Project. Several members of the 
Embarcadero Arts Master Plan Advisory Committee were also 



VAC-MIN7. 91-twm 



Page 



present to review the proposal: Peg Divine, Martha 
Ketterer, Leonard Tom, Emilio Cruz and Stan Reinfeld. 

The team's concept is to tell the story of the Embarcadero 
through signs and stories depicted in embossed bronze 
inlays and porcelain enamel photographs. For the South 
Embarcadero, the tale will be told through a variety of 
bronze inlays incorporating poetry, facts and images, a 
series of six vertical columns depicting events of major 
importance, and two viewer podiums which pose photographic 
images and reminiscences of the former skyline against the 
contemporary reality. 

The design team is in the process of developing a site 
plan to identify the exact location of the signage. The 
site plan will be reviewed as part of the final 
presentation to the Committee. The project's landscape 
architect will develop a plan for imbedding the bronze in 
the sidewalk so as to avoid cracking. 

Commissioner Healy moved for approval of the preliminary 
design concepts and requested that the team submit their 
proposal for further review as part of a 3 phase process. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

Concerning the Promenade Project, Jill Manton reported 
that the structural engineer is concerned about removing 
part of the sea wall. The current plans call for the 
extension of the promenade geographic boundary into the 
marginal wharf which would require Port and DPW approval 
and adds additional costs to the project. In addition, the 
seating as currently designed is almost continuous and 
appears to act as a barrier. The artists need to 
reconsider these issues. Currently they are narrowing and 
refining their scope of work, and as their designs are 
resolved, they will return to the Visual Arts Committee 
for further review. The Commissioners emphasized the 
importance of the Promenade team coordinating their work 
with the Signage artists. 

IV. San Andreas Water Treatment Plant 

Artists Tim Collins and Reiko Goto presented the detailed 
proposal for the two-part book project for the San Andreas 
Water Treatment Plant. The Water Department reviewed the 
proposal and indicated it's support in a letter to the 
Arts Commission. The artists will now begin research, 
final design and fabrication of the book and on-site 
installation. They will return to the Committee for 



VAC-MIN7 . 91-twm Page 



additional review at three additional points in the 
project's development.. 

The viewer-activated sound system at the installation will 
be a very high quality, low-maintenance system. It will 
be maintained by engineers from the Treatment Plant's 
control room. 

Commissioner Healy moved approval of the final proposal 
and authorization to the director to enter into contract 
for fabrication for an amount not to exceed $50,000. 
Commissioner Sklar seconded the motion. It was so moved. 

IV. Moseone Center/Howard Street Project 

In response to direction by the Arts Commission at it's 
July meeting, staff presented a proposed scope of work and 
fee schedule for Art Enrichment at Moseone Center/Howard 
Street. The Committee approved a schedule of fees in 
relation to the following services to be completed by the 
artists: resolution of text; completion of working 
drawings; budget, maintenance and feasibility studies; 
compliance, if required, with the City's approval process. 
The scope of work is subject to review and revision by the 
City Attorney before a contract can be let. 

Commissioner Healy moved approval of the scope of work in 
relation to fees. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The 
ayes were unanimous. 

Jill Manton read comments concerning the project from the 
following citizens: Nikki Rothman, Marie Chaput, Mrs. 
Corbett. Their comments are available upon request. 

Commissioner Healy asked that the public be informed as to 
the source of Art Enrichment funds, the Selection process 
and the role of the Arts Commission. 

V. Arts Commission Gallery 

Director Anne Meissner introduced Tony Labat , who 
explained the concept and background for an exhibition he 
proposes to curate titled "Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kill!". 
The exhibit would be installed from October 2 to December 
6, 1991. Mr. Labat presented slides of previous work of 
some of the artists and descriptions of proposed work for 
the show. The Committee asked that he return to their 
next meeting with a detailed description of each artist's 
installation and/or performances. 



VAC-MIN7 . 91-twm Page - 3 



VI. Ellis-O' Farrell Garage 

Tonia Macneil presented the results of the Selection Panel 
meeting for the Municipal Parking Garages which was held 
on Monday, July 29. The Selection Panelists included 
Barbara Sklar, who acted as Commission liaison, art critic 
Rebecca Solnit, architect Peter Pfau, and artists John 
Woodall and Hung Liu. The Panel reviewed the work of 80 
artists and selected 4 semi final ists for the Ellis- 
O'Farrell garage. 

Short lists have also been developed for two other garages 
and the Committee will be asked to select finalists for 
those projects at a later date. 

Staff asked the Visual Arts Committee to select a finalist 
for the Ellis O'Farrell project, so that the artist could 
begin working with the architects and incorporate the new 
designs into working drawings. After viewing slides of 
the four artists, the Committee unanimously approved 
artist Christopher Sproat for the commission. 
Commissioner Boas moved approval of the artist and 
authorization to the Director to enter into contract with 
the Commission for an amount not to exceed $55,000. 
Commissioner Sklar seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

VII. Request for Approval of Resolution 

Commissioner Boas asked the Visual Arts Committee to 
approve a resolution requesting that the Smithsonian 
Institute reconsider plans to close the De Young Museum 
site of the Western Regional Office of the Archives of 
American Art. Commissioner Healy moved to approve the 
resolution. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so 
moved . 

VITT. Market Street Master Plan 

Tonia Macneil asked that the Committee approve a contract 
extension for the design team until September 30, 1991. 
Commissioner Healy moved the extension, Commissioner 
LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. Commissioner 
Boas registered her opinion that the phrase selected for 
the billboard project would not have a big impact. 

IX. New Main Library 

Susan Pontious reported on the progress of contract 
negotiations with Lothar Baumgarten. The artist has 
proposed creating a single piece involving a painted 
phrase on a large semi-circular wall under the central 
skylit cupola. The artist will spend two weeks on the 



VAC-MIN7 . 91-twm Page 



site once the building is complete and do measurements and 
make a template and supervise the painting. He is 
requesting a travel allowance and a per diem during his 
stay in the City in addition to his fee of $85,000. 

In response to questions concerning the scope of work, 
Susan Pontious stated that originally the artist had 
created five or six drawings for various parts of the 
building. The designs are no longer workable because the 
final dimensions and designs of those sites have changed. 
Commissioner Boas moved to approve an additional $10,000 
in travel allowance and per diem for the artist, 
conditional upon receipt and approval of a drawing 
illustrating his proposal. Commissioner Healy seconded. 
The ayes were unanimous. 

X. Kezar Stadium 

Susan Pontious reported that the gates at Kezar Stadium 
had been installed, but that there was a difference in the 
as-built grade at the site from the grade as planned, so 
that it is possible now to crawl under the gates. The 
situation must be corrected and the cost of the necessary 
changes to the gates will be $2,825.00. The Recreation 
and Parks Department has been informed of the problem and 
asked to reimburse the Commission for the cost of 
modifications to the gates. Commissioner Sklar moved to 
approve modification of the contract with artist Allen 
Fleming, increasing the contract amount by $2825.00, 
contingent upon receipt of a work order of funds from the 
Recreation and Parks Department, for design modification 
of the bottom of the gates at Kezar Stadium and extension 
of the contract through October 31, 1991. Commissioner 
Boas seconded. It was so moved. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:35 p.m. 



REPORTS AND ORDERS: 

1. Ordered: Approval of the June 26, 1991 minutes. 
Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vote: Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Approval of progress payment of $1,500.00 
to Jaap Bongers for completion of fabrication of artwork 
for the Richmond Police Station. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN7 .91-twm Page - 5 



3. Ordered: Approval of the site in front of City Hall 
currently occupied by the reflecting pools (scheduled for 
removal) as another possible site to be considered for the 
Pioneer Monument. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: Approval to increase the honorarium for the 
Four Garages Selection Panelists by $15 each, for a total 
not to exceed $90 per panelist. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Approval of contract extension for Shelly 
Jurs (Richmond Police Station) to September 30, 1991. 
Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: Approval of design concepts as presented by 
Michael Manwaring and Nancy Leigh Olmstead for the 
Historical and Interpretive Signage project. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: Approval of design proposal for the San 
Andreas Water Treatment Plant Expansion #2 and 
authorization to the Director to enter into a fabrication 
contract with artists Tim Collins and Reiko Goto Collins 
for an amount not to exceed $50,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

8. Ordered: Approval of artist Christopher Sproat to 
design, fabricate and install a work of art for the Ellis- 
O'Farrell Garage and authorization to the Director to 
enter into contract for an amount not to exceed $55,000. 
Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vote: Unanimous 

9. Ordered: Approval of Design Development contract 
payment schedule in relation to fees for the Moscone 
Center/Howard Street project. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN7 . 91 -I win 



Page 



10. Ordered: Approval of resolution requesting that the 
Smithsonian Institute reconsider plans to close the 
Western Regional Office of the Archives of American Art. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

11. Ordered: Approval of contract extension for the 
Market Street Master Plan until September 30, 1991 for 
administrative purposes. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

12. Ordered: Approval of up to $10,000 for travel and 
per diem for Lothar Baumgarten in addition to the design 
fee of $85,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

13. Ordered: Approval of contract modification for Allen 
Fleming increasing contract by $2825.00, contingent upon 
receipt of a work order of funds from the Recreation and 
Parks Department, for the design modification of the 
bottom of the gates at Kezar Stadium and extension of 
contract through October 31, 1991. 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MINT . 91-twm 



Page 



IT 



CONSENT CALENDAR ITEMS 

PROJECT: Richmond Police Station 

PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macneil 

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE: September, 1991 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 

1 . Shelley Jurs 
Ornate glass panels will be installed in the front doors 
and transom of the remodeled Police Station. 

2. Jaap Bongers 
Marble and granite floor pieces will be installed in the 
floor of the station. The 6' square marble piece is made 
of closely-fitting marble and bronze pieces in a radiating 
circular design and will be located under the central 
skylight. The 4' square granite piece is a simple sand- 
blasted design on black granite and will be installed 
immediately inside the front door. 

STATUS: The artists are completing fabrication now. 

TIMELINE: The installation of the 6' floor piece will 
take place on August 1. The -1 ' piece will be completed 
and installed by the end of August. The glass pieces are 
scheduled for installation by the end of August. 

ACTION REQUESTED: 

1. Approval of contract extension for Shelley Jurs, to 
September 30, 1991. (The fabrication and installation of 
her piece were delayed due to delays in the construction 
schedule ) . 

2. Approval of progress payment to artist Jaap Bongers 
following fabrication of artwork for Richmond Police 

S tat i on . 



u 



PROJECT: Four Municipal Parking Garages/ Selection 
Process 

PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macneil 

PROJECT STATUS: A guest Selection Panel will meet on July 
29 to identify a short list of artists for each of the 
four garages. The Panel will recommend 3 to 5 artists 
per site to the Visual Arts Committee, which will then 
select finalists. 

Because of the length of the Selection Panel meeting, we 
would like to serve food to the Panelists, however, now 
that the Friends is no longer in place, it is not possible 
to set aside funds for this purpose. Therefore, we are 
requesting an increase in the honorarium to cover the cost 
of reimbursing the Panelists for their food. 

ACTTON REQUESTED : 

Approval of increase of $15.00 in the honorarium for Guest 
panelists for the Selection Panel for the 4 garages. 



JK & 



WATERFRONT TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS 
DATE: JULY 17, 1991 



PROJECT MANAGER: 
TOTAL BUDGET: 



PROJECT DURATION 



DESCRIPTION: 



JILL MANTON 

$1,557,500 (INCLUSIVE OF 
IMPLEMENTATION COSTS FOR 
ART PROJECTS AND RELATED 
ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS) 



DESIGN AND 
4 INTEGRATED 



JUNE 1990 THROUGH JANUARY 1994 



The City utilized a unique and innovative approach to 
urban design in the conception and development of the 
Waterfront Transportation Projects. Through the lobbying 
and advocacy efforts of the Arts Commission, an artist was 
selected to participate in the design of these projects 
which span a 2 1/2 mile stretch of the waterfront from 6th 
and King Street to Bay and Northpoint Street. Part of his 
scope of work involved the development of a comprehensive 
Arts Master Plan to be implemented in conjunction with the 
Waterfront Transportation Projects. 

The four projects which have been approved and funded are: 

The Historical and Interpretive Signage Project - an 
artist and historian team will tell the story of the 
waterfront with words and images along the 2 1/2 mile 
project length. The will include information about the 
past, present and will also provide information about the 
bayside ecology. 

Artist: Michael Manwaring 

Historian/Writer: Nancy Leigh Olmstead 

Design Fee: $80,000 

Implementation budget: $450,000 (exclusive of mid- 

Embarcadero which will be funded from a separate source at 

a later date . ) 



The Promenade Ribbon Project - an artist/ architect team 
have developed a concept that is based upon the notion 
that the Embarcadero is the edge of the City. In their 
project, they propose to reveal the juncture of land and 
water and re-create it where it doesn't naturally exist, 
this will involve the removal of the sidewalk that rests 
upon the seawall which will reveal the bay water beneath. 
They will replace the sidewalk with a long continous 
industrial grate that can be walked or driven upon. 
Another part of their proposal involves the introduction 



-JSL 



of bay water to the promenade where the large bulkhead 
buildings preclude any access to or visibility of the bay. 
The trough would feature circulating bay water which would 
be brought to the promenade by a simple, low tech pumping 
device - a paddle wheel or a conveyor belt. The third 
aspect of the artists' proposal involves the building up 
or ramping up of the sidewalk so that it actually provides 
the function of seating. The sidewalk would be elevated to 
a height of 24 inches and would recall the movement of the 
tide and waves in its gentle undulations. 



At this point, the artist 
project design integrated 
documents for the sidewal 
D.P.W. (Department of Pub 
number of issues have to 
in the process of consult 
determine where the artis 
sidewalk without damaging 
preliminary drawings are 
for comments. The Port's 
liability issues. Meeting 
representatives of variou 
their requirements and co 
BCDC (Bay Conservation De 
regulatory agency) has be 
potential approval of thi 
obtaining their approval 
permitting process. This 
process that must be hand 
manner . 



s would like to have their 

into the overall construction 
k and roadway being prepared by 
lie Works). In order to do this a 
be immediately resolved. We are 
ing with a structural engineer to 
ts can actually remove the 
the seawall. The artists' 
being reviewed by Port engineers 
attorney is being consulted about 
s have occurred with 
s disabled groups to learn of 
ncerns relative to the design, 
velopment Commission, a state 
en consulted regarding their 
s project and the likelihood of 
without undertaking a year long 
is a time-consuming, complicated 
led in a careful systematic 



Project Artists: Vito Acconci 

Barbara Stauffacher Solomon 
Project Architect: Stanley Saitowitz 



Total Budget: 



$600,000 (design and implementation 
for south and north Embarcadero only) 



Artist Design Fee for South Embarcadero: $45,000 

Artist Working Drawing Fee for South Embarcadero: $15,000 

Contract Status: Contract is being written at this point 
by staff and should be ready for review and signatures by 
July 26 to July 31 , 1991 . 



Muni Metro Portal and Turnaround 



We are currently announcing this project opportunity where 
an artist will be selected to work witli project engineers 
on the design of the MUNI Metro Portal as it emerges from 
the earth on the Embarcadero between Howard and Folsom 



nr 



Streets. The artist will design the above-ground form of 
this portal and will be able to influence the surface 
treatment of visible walls. The art and design are totally 
integrated. 

RFQ Deadline: July 30, 1991 

Project budget: $50,000 (design only) 

Project goal: Select artist by fall of 1991 



South Gateway at 2nd and King Streets 

Three artists have been selected as finalists for this 
project. They are currently in the process of preparing a 
maquette which will be submitted by September 16, 1991. 
The objective of this project is to celebrate and announce 
the transition between the City and the waterfront. 
The finalists are: Mark DiSuvero 

Si te , Inc. 

Kristen Jones and Andrew Ginzel 



Project Budget: 



$295,000, design and implement ion 



Project specifications due (only information needed for 
sidewalk construction drawings): November 1, 1991 



3Z 



PROJECT: Ellis O'Farrell Parking Garage 

PROJECT MANAGER : Tonia Macneil 

PROJECT STATUS: The Selection Panel for the Four Garages 
has identified a short list of artists for the project. 
The Visual Arts Committee is responsible for selection of 
a final ist . 

Staff is requesting that the Committee select an artist 
for the project at this time. This timing will result in 
a considerable increase in the overall project budget, as 
some engineering and mechanical costs can be absorbed in 
the building construction budget. The artist will have 
about 30 days to work with the architects to develop a 
final proposal and to integrate the design into the 
architect's working drawings. 

ACTION REQUESTED: Approval of artist and 

authorization to the Director to enter into contract with 
the artist for an amount not to exceed $55,000. 



V//_ 



STAFF REPORTS, JULY 1991 

PROJECT: Moscone Center/Howard Street 
PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macneil 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 

The proposal by Los Angeles- based team of Daniel Martinez, 
Renee Petropoulos and architect Roger White was approved 
in concept for the exterior of Moscone Center at Howard 
Street . 

The proposed art work spans the street at four points in 
the block of Howard Street between 3rd and 4th Streets. 
The phrase "This isa Nice Neighborhood" is broken into 
four parts, each word/phrase being created in aluminum 
letters 15' high and 90' wide starting 18' above the 
street. The letters are attached to 'off the shelf' 
freeway-sign structures which span the street. The phrase 
is also created in neon in Chinese facing east and Spanish 
facing west. 

Other elements of the sculpture include: 

1. Sandblasted sentences in the sidewalks on both sides of 
the street . 

2. In front of Moscone North, flagpoles topped by globes, 
each with a different continent. 

3. Enlarged street mar-kings on Howard Street between Third 
and Fourth. 

4. Trees in selected locations on the site. 

PROJECT STATUS: The proposal by Daniel Martinez' team was 
approved with contingencies by the Arts Commission at the 
July meeting. The artists have been asked to respond to 
concerns about language used in the artwork, to develop a 
workable budget and to provide assurance that the project 
is feasible. The Commission has agreed to a fee of 
$50,000 to resolve these issues during design development. 

The artists will return to a special meeting of the Visual 
Arts Committee in mid-August to present their response to 
the language issues. An appropriate meeting date should 
be identified at this time. 



aZil. 



The proposed scope of work and payment schedule is as 
f ol lows : 

Scope of Work: 

1. Resolve to the satisfaction of the Arts Commission, 
issues raised concerning the language used in the 
sculpture . 

2. Develop a workable budget, including a plan which 
identifies funding and jurisdiction for maintenance and 
repai r . 

3. Provide assurance to the satisfaction of the Arts 
Commission that the project is technically feasible. 

Payment Schedule: 

(It is standard procedure for an Art Enrichment contract 
to identify several interim payments to artists in order 
to assure that they have the necessary funds to do their 
work. ) 

Payment #1: Upon contract certification: For resolution 
of language issues and an advance payment on production of 
design development drawings and development of a budget 
consistent with the total available funds of $500,000. 

Payment #2: Upon completion of drawings, approval of 
preliminary budget and advance on all costs associated 
with procuring city approvals as needed. 

Payment #3: Upon approval of budget, completion of 
working drawings and resolution of maintenance issues. 

Payment #4 : Upon resolution of all contingencies, receipt 
of city approvals as needed, and upon approval of the Arts 
Commission to commence fabrication. 

Staff will provide the proposed fee schedule in relation 
to these payments during the Visual Arts Committee 
meeting . 



TTMKLINE: The artists hope to be able to work with the 
contractor now on the site to install the footings for the 



Ujj 



sculpture by June of 1992, which puts this project on an 
extremely fast track. 

The opportunity to work with the on-site contractors will 
afford considerable savings to the project, as the north 
side of the street wilL still be open, and the contractors 
could also be hired to install the footings on the south 
side . 

Briefly, in order to meet the contractor's construction 
schedule, the following timeline is required: 

Mid-August - Meeting of VAC to hear resolution of language 
issues. Approval of proposal in regard to language 
issues . 

End September - Contract certification. 

End October - Approval of preliminary budget. 

November to end December - Project feasibility studies, 
assurance of compliance with City codes and regulations. 

End December- Approval of final budget, project 
feasibility, authorization to enter into contract for 
f abr icat ion . 

J anuary, 1992 - Authorization to contractor to install 
footings on Howard Street. 

June, 1992 - Completion of footings. 

Spri ng , 1993 - Installation of artwork. 

ACTION REQUESTED: 

1. Approval of scope of work and payment schedule in 
relation to fees for Design Development phase. 

2. Designation of appropriate meeting date to hear 
artists' responses to language issues. 



jjjh b 



MARKET STREET ART IN TRANSIT - MASTER PLAN AND SEEDING 
PROJECTS 

PROJECT MANAGER: JILL MANTON 
PROJECT INTERN: ELEANOR BEATON 

18 July 1991 

Status Report: Market Street Seeding Projects 

Castro Theatre/Muni Metro Project: 

Our intent is to pipe the live organ sound from the Castro 
Theatre into the Muni station. We are awaiting permission of 
the Castro Theatre to proceed with a sound engineer's 
technical analysis. Mr. B lumenf eld , the theatre owner, has 
not returned our repeated phone calls and letters. 

Questionnaire Project: 

The question: "What do you consider to be the highest form 
of public art?"* is to be presented on a series of posters 
(and other display spaces) to encourage the public to enter 
into the discussion of public art. The design for the 
posters, which will be displayed on Gannett shelter kiosks 
along Market Street, will be finalized and ready for print 
production in approximately 2 weeks. If space is available, 
through Patrick Media or Gannett, the question will also be 
displayed a billboard on Market Street. Approval has been 
secured to display questionnaire responses on the L.E.D. 
signs in Muni stations. 

Banner Series: 



Banners will be hung along Market Street from the 
Embarcadero to Van Ness Avenue, celebrating the street. The 
RFQ for the first banner design competition, to select 5 
artists to prepare banner designs, is now being distributed. 
Potential banner manufacturers have been identified. S.F. 
Beautiful, a non-profit organization has been approached for 
possible funding of this project. 

Photo Documentation/Poster Series: 

The RFQ for the photo documentation of Market Street 

neighborhoods resulting in a poster series on the Gannett 

kiosks is now being distributed. Photographers to be 

selected and documentation estimated to begin in October, 

1991. 

Vitrines for temporary installations: 

Sites have been identified in the Bart stations along Market 
Street for the possible placement of display vitrines for 
changing exhibits - potential "mini-museums" for 
collaboration with other cultural organizations. Dimensions 
and design of vitrines still to be determined. Design and 



m 



placement to be approved by BART as well as MUNI because 4 
of the Market Street. MUNI Metro stations are under the 
jurisdiction of BART. 

Master Plan Publication: 

Text is expected to be finalized by 7/22/91. Graphic 
designers are currently being interviewed for availability 
and ability to work within the budget as well as 
appropriateness to the project. 

A Design Team including two landscape architects, Delaney 
and Cochran and an artist, Paul Kos has been selected by the 
Commission in 1990 to produce the Market Street Arts Master 
Plan. Because of a de teriori za t ion in personal and 
philosophical relations among team members, the process has 
been delayed and problematic in terms of management. 
Ultimately, the Commission voted to terminate the team's 
contract. At the advice of our City Attorney, we were 
obliged to offer the design team the option to remedy their 
contract. In other words, if they could fulfill their 
obligation by the termination date, the Commision would 
accept the material, make final payment and conceivably 
extend the contract if necessary for "editing and fine- 
tuning." Paul Kos withdrew from the team and did not 
participate in writing the text of the final document. 
Topher Delaney and Andrea Cochran produced a document that 
would be usable with substantial editing and revision. In 
evaluating all of the options available to me as Project 
Manager and because of the Commission's promise to the 
public to have this program in operation by the fall, I 
decided to accept their document if they were willing to re- 
write/revise to my specifications. They were amenible. City 
Attorney has no problem with this. Commission is aware of 
all that has transpired. 

The City Attorney advised Margie and I that the Commission 
had the right to proceed with several of the "seeding 
projects" proposed by Paul Kos earlier in the year when he 
was a member of the team. 



This week, the Arts Commission received a letter from an 
attorney representing Paul Kos proposing: 

1. Reimbursement of $1500-$2000 for research expenses 
on the questionnaire 

2. The Bruegel image be included as an integral part 
of the questionnaire 

3. The Arts Commission contract with Paul Kos to 
consult on the completion of elements of the 
program . 



~vm 



Consultation with Kathryn Pennypacker, City Attorney, 
regarding this letter will take place next week when she 
returns from vacation. 



DEENA K. ZACHARIN 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

90 New Montgomery, 1 5th Floor 
San Francisco. California 94105 
415 777 0313 
FAX 415 777.9380 

July 15, 1991 

Jill Manton. 

San Francisco Arts Commission 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Re: Paul Kos 

Dear Ms. Manton: 

Paul Kos has requested that I write to you regarding the 
Market Street Art in Transit Program ("the Program") . 

Mr. Kos has informed me that he developed certain 
concepts for the Program pursuant to a subcontract he entered 
into with landscape architects Delaney & Cochran. One of the 
most important aspects of Mr. Kos 1 contribution to the Program 
is a query he researched and sent to about one hundred people. 
The question, "what do you consider to be the highest form of 
public art?" was sent in conjunction with a color photocopy of 
a Bruegel painting of a street scene. Mr. Kos obtained several 
responses which he had proposed be included in the Program by 
way of posters that would include both the question and the 
Bruegel image. 

When the working relationship between Delaney & Cochran 
and Paul Kos broke down, Delaney & Cochran's contract with the 
City was terminated. Mr. Kos has informed me that he 
understands that the Arts Commission now plans to use his 
ideas in the Program, particularly the concepts of the 
question and the music in the Castro Street Muni station. It 
is our position, that while ideas per se are not 
copyrightable, Mr. Kos' concepts are his protected artistic 
property under basic doctrines of unfair competition and 
contract law, as well as statutory "moral rights" protection. 

As you know, Mr. Kos is an internationally recognized 
conceptual artist. He has received several grants and awards 
for his work, including a Guggenheim, a grant from the 
Rockefeller Foundation, and a SECA award. He teaches in the 
conceptual-art based "New Genres" department at the San 
Francisco Art Institute. My client's concepts are his art and 
must be protected as such. 



Mr. Kos is not opposed to the City incorporating his 
concepts into the Program. He is, in fact, committed to the 
Program. He used his Guggenheim grant to stay in San 
Francisco and participate in the Program, and has planned a 
course at the SFAI on Market Street as public art for the Fall 
semester. However, my client is concerned that the way his 
ideas are being used strips away the basic concepts, and thus 
the integrity, of his work. For example, the Bruegel image is 
integral to Mr. Kos' idea as it provides for a response to the 
question that is not object-based. The image compels the 
viewer to think of public art in a life-style, or community 
sense, rather than simply objects that might be considered 
"art". 

Moreover, Mr. Kos paid $1,500 to $2,000 from his own 
pocket to pay for the research of the question and 
accompanying image. His concept was included in the 
substantial proposal he submitted at the request of the 
Commission. While the Arts Commission did not want to pay for 
Mr. Kos' research assistant, Mr. Kos has been informed that a 
designer and researcher are now being paid to incorporate my 
client's concepts into the Program! 

To alleviate Mr. Kos 1 concerns, while continuing to 
assist in the development of the Program, we propose the 
following resolution: 

1. The Commission reimburse my client the $1,500 to 
$2,000 he paid out-of-pocket for research on the 
question stated above. 

2. The Commission use the Bruegel image in 
conjunction with my client's question on the posters 
planned for distribution as part of the Program. 

3. The Arts Commission contract directly with 
Mr. Kos to consult in the completion of certain 
aspects of the Program. 

Because of the time deadlines involved with printing the 
posters for the Program, it is imperative that this matter be 
resolved as soon as possible. Please call me by July 19, 1991 
to discuss this further. Thank you for your cooperation in 
this matter. 




DKZ:bp 

cc: Paul Kos 



JUL-30-91 TUE 20:15 P , 02 



>\L/^N FLEMING 



SSO A Napoleon Street 

San Prancisco, Ce 

415 641 . 3453 



July 30, 1991 

Re: Gaps at Pavillion and Frederick St. Entrances 

Regarding the changes required at the bottom of the gates for the gaps resulting from the changes 
in grade elevations, the following additional costs will be incurred by Nelson Iron works: 

Extension of 1 4 cane bolts: 1 hour x $50.00 x 1 4 bolts = $ 700.00 

Fabrication of bottom fins: .75 hours x $50.00x14 gates = $ 525.00 

Installation of bottom fins: 2 hours x $ 50.00 x 1 4 gates - $1 ,400.00 

Galvanizing: - 200.00 

Total for changes $ 2,825.00 



•The bottom fins will be a T section, galvanized, and tapped and screwed to the bottom of the 
gates in a consistent manner to reduce this gap. 

•Micheal Lane has requested that these changes be approved so that the work can commence and 
the situation be corrected. 



JUL-30-91 TUE 20:14 P. 01 



gfc ■ -£^<»v^ "Fo^Tiaji 



ffc©**'. At^AiJ fte-T^iMA. 



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25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco, C A 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF PUBLIC ART PROJECT AND 
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS: FIRE STATION #2 

APPLICATION DEADLINE: September 2, 1991 



BUDGET: 

Commiss ion : 

Finalist Honorariums: 



$38,500.00 
$500 ea. 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 

..xilla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
' ' I Y. Okamoto 
^odle Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Drlscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
J55 Grove Street 
5 554-9682 



PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 

Fire Station #2 will be a new facility located at 1340 
Powell Street near Broadway, replacing the current 
structure. One of the goals of the buildings 
architecture and art enrichment project is to harmonize 
with the character of the surrounding Chinatown 
neighborhood . 

PROJECT ARCHITECT: 

Clyde Cohen, San Francisco Bureau of Architecture 

SCOPE OF THE PROJECT: 

* Design of art work in cooperation with the building 
architect and project manager. 

* Production of required drawings and project 
specifications to be incorporated into construction 
documents . 

* Fabrication, transportation and installation of the 
art work. 

PUBLIC ART POSSIBILITIES: 

* Glass Street Canopies (3 at 6'-0" wide X ll'-O" 
long ) 

* Glass in Bay Window (9'-0" X 9'-0") 

* 4 Exterior wall light lanterns. 

SELECTION PROCESS: 

Eligibility 

This commission is open to all artists residing in 
California. Women and multi-cultural artists are 
encouraged to apply. 

Procedure 

Submissions will be pre-screened by the projects curator 
before being submitted to the San Francisco Arts 
Commission's Visual Arts Committee and project advisors 
for review. 



The Committee may select up to three finalists who will 
receive a $500.00 honorarium for the creation of a site 
proposal. After the review of proposals, the Committee 
will select one to recommend to the full Arts Commission 
for the award of the commission. 

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: 

All applications must include the following: 

1. A brief letter of interest. 

2. 10 Slides of recent work numbered and labeled with 
your name, title, dimensions, and material of art 
work . 

3. A typed slide list with the corresponding 
information listed above, as well as location, 
cost, agency and a brief description. 

4. Two copies of your resume. 

5. A sel f -addressed stamped envelope for the return of 
materials . 

TIMELINE: 

Application deadline: September 2, 1991 

Construction documents completed: December 31, 1991 

Construction completed: Spring 1993 

Please Address Applications To: 

Firestation #2 Project 
Attn. Susan Pontious 
San Francisco Arts Commission 
25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 240 
San Francisco, CA 94102 



SET 



BOOK PROPOSAL 
MAPPING THE TERRAIN: THE NEW PUBLIC ART 

Phase I : Manuscript Preparation 
Fall 1991 



Contact: 

Suzanne Lacy 

Dean, School of Fine Arts 

California College of Arts and Crafts 

5212 Broadway, Oakland, California 94618 

415-653-8118 



Book Proposal: Mapping the Terrain Page 2 



REQUEST 

We reguest funding to pay for the preparation of a book-length 
manuscript. Money will be used to pay internationally known 
writers and artists to develop essays and for editors to assemble 
descriptions and photos of exemplary artworks. University of 
California Press has expressed a strong interest in publishing 
this book. A prepared manuscript is needed to translate that 
interest into commitment. 



PURPOSE 

To engage a wide audience (see Audience for Book, page 7) in 
guestioning what is public art and what is its relevance to 
our culture. 

To offer examples of new forms of public art that embody 
unigue models of engagement and demonstrate a range of social 
concerns beyond that normally associated with visual art. 

To articulate concerns for the future of public art and 
create a more cohesive analysis and theory for what we are 
calling "new genre" public art — art that uses both 
non-traditional and traditional media to communicate and 
interact with a broad and diversified audience about issues 
directly relevant to their lives. 



STRUCTURE OF BOOK 

The book will feature eight to ten essays, each approximately 10 
book-pages in length, by selected artists and critics. These 
essays will explore contemporary practice in new genre public art 
and its implications for the role of artists. Together the essays 
will constitute a cohesive look, from the vantage of some of the 
best thinkers in the field, at the future of public art. 

Interwoven with the essays will be a running text of written and 
visual material in the form of sidebars, photos with extended 
captions, short descriptions, and excerpts from interviews. This 
text describes numerous examples of the best experimental public 
artwork being done today and the thinking behind it. It will 
serve as background and illustration to the essays, and in itself 
will be a valuable resource. 



RATIONALE 

Public art is a "growth concern" in the art world today. The 
advent of increased funding through percent-f or-art programs has 
created a highly competitive alternative gallery system, where 
artists vie with each other, architects, and landscape designers 



Book Proposal: Mapping the Terrain Page 3 



for public works commissions. A broadened consumer interest in 
art stimulated by mass media features, along with several highly 
publicized controversies involving artists, have brought our 
attention to art in general and public art in particular. 

Our curiosity has been stimulated: just what is public art, how 
does it get made, and whom does it address? Whose interest does 
it serve? New genre public art, motivated by social issues, 
constitutes an art form that frequently falls outside the current 
discussion. This field is still dominated by sculptural ideas and 
administrative concerns. In recent years, outstanding examples of 
art has emerged, art shaped neither exclusively by visual or 
political information, but by an internal necessity perceived by 
the artist in close collaboration with a defined constituency. 
This art — such as Judith Baca's expanded mural projects and Mierle 
Laderman-Ukeles' work with waste disposal — is based in 
communication, cooperation and community. It suggests that 
artists working in the field have defined new roles for 
themselves. 

These artists are not from traditional molds. They are not always 
studio-trained. As in the case of John Malpede, who works with 
the homeless on collaborative performances, they may not make 
objects recognizable as "art." Instead we might consider them 
problem-solvers, teachers, sculptors of the public imagination. 
They work in a variety of art media and often have extensive 
experience working in communities. They are multicultural, 
community-based, feminist, and political artists who have chosen 
to address audiences that reflect the extremes of our social 
fabric. 

It is evident that there is a need to describe and evaluate this 
new genre of socially interactive public art, to identify its 
themes and work processes, understand the relationship between 
strategy and aesthetics and develop forms of analysis. This book 
will play a major role in clarifying and shaping the critical 
discourse around public art. Each essay will both serve as a 
model for criticism and present a philosophical position that 
accounts for current practice and intention. The editors hope 
that taken together these essays will persuasively reframe the way 
we currently read public art. 



PREMISES TO BE EXPLORED 

In November, 1991, California College of Arts and Crafts (with 
support from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Gerbode Foundation, 
and the National Endowment of the Arts) will convene 25 
internationally prominent artists, writers and public arts 
presenters to consider together those issues they feel are urgent 
to the field. Essayists for this book are among those invited. We 
expect this discussion will stimulate and further their individual 
writing. It will also provide the editors with a comprehensive 



Book Proposal: Mapping the Terrain Paqe 4 



overview that will inform the direction of each essay and its 
interrelationship with the others. 

Some of the premises to be explored include: 

o How might a community of concerns serve as the basis for 
defining a genre of art, rather than basing comparisons 
on a similarity in media, e.g. painting? 

o Does the role and language of critics change when 

considering new genre public art? Do their audiences 
change along with those for the art itself? 

o Do artists have particular skills and perceptual modes 
to bring to the table in formulating a public agenda? 
How are their endeavors seen in the context of the 
broader social picture? 

o Modes of working and their implications, including 

collaboration, involvement of non-artists in planning 
and production, interests that "cross-over" with other 
disciplines, intentional community creation within an 
artwork, and bringing attention to public issues through 
art. 

o The peripherality or centrality of the artist as she/he 
positions themselves within the public process. Does 
the artist posit community, for example, or take 
advantage of the outsider position? 

o The implications of a more specified and multilayered 
audience for art. 

o Effectiveness of the artwork. How is it measured, and 
by whose terms? What is the relationship between the 
artist's intention and the actual result? 

o Revising art education to prepare young artists for new 
environments and new roles 

o What is the role of artists in educating a broader 
public? 



PARTICIPANTS 

Editors have two roles. They will select the essayists, work 
with them to determine direction of individual essays 
and ensure their interrelationship so that a 
comprehensive whole rather than a loose collect.-.on ..s 
developed. They will determine with the. research 
editor the selection of artists whose worj: will be 
included in the examples. The research editor will 



Book Proposal: Mapping the Terrain 



Page 5 



Writers 



collect names for consideration, select pieces of 
writing describing the work, and draft essays, 
interviews and other short pieces. 

Editors are Suzanne Lacy and Arlene Raven (see Appendix 
for bios) . The research editor has not been selected. 
Editorial advice from Leonard Hunter (see Appendix for 
bio) . 

are charged with drafting individual essays. These 
people are critics, theorists, and visual artists of 
national and international reputation, who were selected 
for their familiarity with this work and their ability 
to articulate ideas about art and the social whole. 



The editors have invited the following to write essays: 
Lucy Lippard, Suzi Gablik, Patricia Phillips, Arlene 
Raven, Allan Kaprow, and Guillermo Gomez-Pena. These 
people are widely published with extensive track records 
in art theory. We feel they are uniquely qualified to 
articulate the urgent themes of contemporary art (see 
Appendix for bios) . 

An additional two to four essayists will be selected 
from among the 25 participants of the conference after 
it is over. We are reserving this option in order to be 
able to respond to gaps in the outline of issues that 
will be formulated by conferees. 

Designer will graphically articulate the conflicts and challenges 
for artists working in the public sector. His challenge 
will be to coherently interweave the essays with the 
running text produced by the research editor, so that 
they are seen as a whole. The artwork examples will 
serve as the ground upon which theory is explored. 

Michael Manwaring has agreed to design the book (see 
Appendix for bio) . 

Artists will provide the material for the running text-- 

examples of work, texts from interviews, photos and 
descriptions. Selected artists will include Mierle 
Laderman Ukeles, David Hammons, Hans Haacke, Ann 
Hamilton, Newton and Helen Harrison, Judith Baca, Adrian 
Piper, Didi Halleck, Sheila de Bretteville, Victor 
Masayevasa, Edgar Heap Of Birds, Mildred Howard, John 
Malpede, Tim Rollins, Carlos Villa, Houstin Conwill, 
Guillermo Gomez Pena, Maya Lin, Jennie Holzer, and 
others. 



Book Proposal: Mapping the Terrain 



Page 6 



WORK PLAN/TIMELINE 

Aug/Sept Editors, with essayists, will hold extended phone 1991 
conversations to elicit emerging issues in their own 
writing and their observations of artists' practices. 
Essayists will identify themes to be explored at the 
retreat. They will be asked to begin an outline for 
their written piece. 

The research editor will develop a preliminary list of 
names of artists to be considered for the running text. 
She/he will write to these artists to collect photos, 
project descriptions and other material. Ideas for how 
this material will appear in final form will be 
developed. 

November Public Symposium and Retreat sponsored by CCAC. A 
1991 one-evening public symposium will identify urgent issues 
as seen by the 25 participants plus Bay Area audience 
members. These will be presented in a speak-out format 
where each speaker has the microphone for three minutes. 
These brainstormed topics, along with the more 
thoroughly shaped themes from the editors extended 
conversations with essayists, will constitute the 
discussion agenda at the retreat. 

The retreat will be tape-recorded for future use as 
background material for the introduction and essays. 
Brief and well-edited sections of the transcript may 
prove to be valuable for the book. 

All participants at the retreat will be asked to 
contribute names of artists to the research editor for 
use in the running text portion of the book. 

At the end of the retreat essayists will meet with 
editors to consider how their initial outlines may have 
been changed by the proceedings of the retreat, how 
their ideas intersect, and what shape of the whole 
should be. Gaps will be filled out by invitations to 
other essayists. Essayists will leave with the focus of 
their essay more clearly defined. 

Nov/Jan Editors will review retreat transcripts and notes to 
91/92 continue refining themes for the book. They will work 
with essayists as needed in the preparation of a ten 
book-page manuscript that is appropriately formated in 
disc and hard copy formats. This includes counseling as 
to content, setting deadlines, specifying delivery 
form. 



Research editor determines list of artists in 
consultation with editors, contacts them and gathers 
relevant examples. First draft of running text is 



Book Proposal: Mapping the Terrain 



Page 7 



February 
1992 



Mar/Apr 
1992 



prepared. This includes both format suggestions and 
written text for captions, sidebars, guotes, interviews, 
exchanges between artists and mini-essays. 

Essays due to editors. A few of these may be presented 
this month at the College Art Association in Conference, 
in a panel chaired by Suzanne Lacy and Leonard Hunter. 

The designer will review material and consider 
preliminary graphic design ideas. 

Revisions in essays and running text as needed to create 
more cohesive total manuscript. Photographs collected. 
Editors draft and revise introduction. Designer 
receives material as it becomes available. 



May 
1992 



Manuscript ready for publication, 
draft of graphic design plan. 



Designer completes 



AUDIENCE FOR BOOK 

This book will be of interest to practitioners in the field of 
visual arts, including artists, critics, historians, curators and 
theoriticians. As mentioned previously, public art is an 
important and growing concern today. Even more so are these 
particular issues, targeted by experts in the field during a 
recent planning conference at University of Southern California, 
essential to art education in the future. 



It will serve as an educational tool for the college and 
university level arts programs in the country, as well as for 
specific courses in cultural theory and popular culture. It will 
provide a valuable resource of examples of contemporary artists 
working in this area. There is also indication that some parts of 
Europe's educational and art communities will be interested in 
this book. Several schools in England are experimenting with 
relevant educational ideas that can be informed by these ideas. 
Alf Lohr, German critic attending the retreat, is currently 
drafting a book of new American public artists in German. 

The new and rapidly growing field of administration for public art 
includes managers of percent for art programs, city, county and 
national programs, independent consultants, curators and public 
officials (such as those in public works, transportation and city 
planning) . These professionals constitute a major audience for 
this book. Currently the San Francisco City Arts Commission, an 
agency of the City government, is working with MAPPING THE TERRAIN 
conference planners to use ideas generated at the retreat as an 
agenda for their statewide administrators conference. They feel 
these issues foreshadow their own future practice, and they must 
be prepared to support these art practices in the public sector. 



Book Proposal: Mapping the Terrain Page 8 



There is a large body of professional and non-professional 
surveyors of popular culture. These people, including social and 
media theorists, as well as informed laymen, will be interested in 
the notion of a public practice of what has been construed in this 
country as a private process. That is, it will expand and 
challenge their notions of art, and stimulate them to think more 
broadly of the role of artists in culture. The alignment of 
artists with larger social concerns will draw those people 
interested in the issues of the work itself, such as ecologists, 
who will see in this book models for their own work. The editors 
have been approached recently to be on the national board of a 
Washington, D.C. -based organization whose mission is to bring such 
artists as those described in this book in contact with national 
social change organizations. 

It is the editors intent to appeal to a popular audience in the 
same manner as much of this artwork reaches a broad constituency. 
As such, we will encourage a lively and readable tone in the 
essays. The running text will allow people to browse through the 
book, picking up intriguing examples and short sections, as well 
as read the more involved essays. The pacing of the whole, 
supported by the graphic design, will be entertaining as well as 
thought-provoking . 

The book will reach these audiences through art and educational 
channels—bookstores, advertising and reviews in trade journals, 
assignment as classroom text. Most important to note, the 
reputation of several of these contributors is such that the 
combination of them together in one book will be an enormous draw 
among their followers. If it seems advisable to the publisher, 
some of these essays can be published in part or in whole in 
leading journals. 



RELATED BOOKS 

Art in the Public Interest , Arlene Raven, Ed., UMI Press, 1989 
Going Public , Jeffery Cruickshank and Pam Korza, NEA publication, 

1988 
Mixed Blessings , Lucy Lippard, Pantheon, 1990 
Reenchantment of Art , Suzi Gablik, Hudson Thames, (to be 

published) 
Reimaging America, The Arts of Social Change , Mark O'Brien and 

Craig Little, ed. , New Society Publishers, 1990 
Insights/On Sites , Stacey Paleologos Harris, NEA, 1984 



07'25/91 12:13 



SOT 

6/26/91 



Capp Street Pro|ect/AVT and Mowry Baden 

Proposal for a Temporary Sculpture In 

Justin Herman Plaza 

Capp Street Project is proposing to exhibit a temporary sculpture by public artist 
Mowry Baden for Justin Herman Plaza from September 1991 through April 1992. 
Baden Is developing a human-scale structure made ot steel, aluminum and concrete 
for the lowest level of the Plaza approximately 30 feet beyond the perimeter steps 
(specific site contingent on Rec. & Park requirements with consideration for the 
artist's preference of location and orientation). 

The artist has chosen Justin Herman Plaza because of his interest in the diverse 
social and cultural activities of this large, public gathering place. At present the 
Plaza is used by tourists, business people, shoppers, skateboarders, and others. 
The proposed sculpture will be a quiet refuge, a sanctuary, into which pedestrians 
can enter in order to view the activities of this busy metropolitan site from a new and 
unusual vantage point. Structural elements within the piece will double as seating. 

"What Interests me about the site is its position between the city and the sea. 
Pedestrian flow In the plaza can be compared to ocean currents. As tidal changes 
occur in Ihe Bay nearby, so do social changes occur in and around the plaza. 

The plaza is also more than a simple thoroughfare; people dine at Its perimeter, 
tourists approach it from all sides and commuters cross it to reach the ferry. My 
selection of materials and forms has been guided by complex forces. Consequently, 
disjunctive metaphors have surfaced during the design process. One metaphor is 
that of the 'refuge' or 'sanctuary.' Another is linked to the sea. The latter reference is 
Imbedded in some of the found elements In the design: a shipwright's jig forms the 
central hub of the piece. A crow's nest from a trawler stands at the perimeter of the 
work. To these I have added other components like the bulk food barrels that are 
today's equivalent of the wooden, shipboard barrel. 

When 'brought ashore' these elements behave In unexpected ways. Their maritime 
history disintegrates, but doesn't disappear. Perhaps the barrels become buoys, the 
crow's nest becomes the operator's cage on a backhoe and the shipwright's jig 
becomes an armored sanctuary. This second set of metaphors seem to point to a 
larger, more embracing meaning; the sculpture begins to look and feel like a refuge, 
its perimeler marked by barrels/buoys and crow's nest/cage and its center anchored 
by a massive shipwright's jig." -- Mowry Baden 



"Mowry Baden expects people to use his sculptures physically; he does not make 
sculpture solely for people to look at. He intentionally designs his sculptures to 
provide the viewer with a kinesthetic experience - a bodily awareness of movement. 
The sculptures provide space for self-revelation and opportunities to awaken 
unconscious sensory faculties." - Llane Davidson, "Mowry Baden: Sculpture," 1989. 



87/25/-91 12:14 S 415 626 7791 



6/26/91 Capp Street Project/Mowry Baden Page 2. 

Justin Herman Plaza 



Baden's work consistently explores human exertion and motion. A specific example 
of this exploration Is "Silage Beach" (1988) for the San Francisco Exploratorium. 
Consisting of a cylindrical space formed out of walls of moving stripped fabric, the 
piece experiments with the phenomenon of clrcularvection (the sensation of 
rotation). After several moments in the space watching the walls go around, visitors 
experience the sensation of moving themselves. Other works such as "Allegheny 
Corn Slice" (1988) and "Going Against the Grain" (1984) explore other aspects of 
motion, those of futile or unattainable goals, through visitor participation. 

In Baden's proposal for Justin Herman Plaza, viewer participation takes the form of 
quiet intervention. Motion is recorded in the viewer's field of vision from Baden's 
sculptural "sanctuary." Participants, coming from each of the varied communities 
that use Justin Herman Plaza, will find a quiet place from which they can view the 
activities surrounding them. 



i?'25/91 12: 14 



2 415 626 7791 



6/26/91 



Capp Street Project/Mowry Baden 
Justin Herman Plaza 



Page 3. 



DESCRIPTION and INSTALLATION 



Artist: 

Presenting Institution: 

Proposed Location: 

Exhibition Period: 

Materials: 

Approx. Dimensions: 

Weight: 
Maintenance: 

Maintenance Budget: 
Bond: 



Mowry Baden, 5450 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, British 
Columbia, V8H-4M6, CANADA. 604-727-3119. 
Capp Street Project/A VT, 270 14th Street, San Francisco, 
CA 94103. 415-626-7747 
Justin Herman Plaza; the lowest level of the Plaza 
approximately 30 feet beyond the perimeter steps. 
September 1991 through April 1992 (or renegotiated for 
extension). 

Steel, aluminum, concrete, plastic bulk food barrels, safety 
matting. 

25 ft wide x 15 ft long x 11ft high (sculpture itself) 
50 ft wide x 30 ft long (with exterior concrete castings) 
Approximately 700 lbs. 

Supervised by Mowry Baden and Susan Miller, Capp 
Street Project, with volunteer assistance. 
$1 ,000 over length of the installation period. 
$1 ,000 or whatever Recreation and Park deems 
appropriate. 
Insurance: Insurance Company of North America through Marsh and 

McLennan, San Francisco. 
Policy #: D1 82 83 64 3 

General Liability: $2,000,000 aggregate; $1,000,000 each 
occurence 
Property: $12,500 

Additionally Insured: Recreation and Park Commission, If 
necessary. 

The artist's drawings describe a basic eight-sided figure with a side cut out for an 
entrance/exit. It is fully exposed and is to be viewed trom both the outside and Inside. 
Except for a few planar elements overhead, the sculpture is virtually transparent. 
Interior structural elements double as seating lor participants. 

The sculpture will be made of aluminum, concrete, playground mat and stainless 
stell tamperproof fasteners. Typical aluminum sections are- 

1 1/4" schedule 40 pipe 

6" schedule 40 pipe 

6" triangular section (12 ga wall) 

10" pentagonal section (12 ga wall) 

In addition, the sculpture contains - 

3 45-gallon plastic bulk food containers 

1 low concrete cound approximately 8' diameter x 4" high 



6/26/91 Capp Street Project/Mowry Baden Page 

Justin Herman Plaza 



For placement, the artist is unaware of what the substrate is and is assuming that the 
bricks/tiles on the Plaza floor can be removed to reveal a concrete structure 
underneath. The sculpture would then be bolted with threaded steel rods (17 in all) 
Into the supporting concrete under the Plaza surface. 

The pouring of the concrete would occur at the site. Plastic sheeting would be 
employed as a preventive barrier to protect the exposed brick/tiles. All materials will 
be hauled from an appropriate work site as determined by Recreation and Park 
and/or the Embarcadero Management. 

At the end of the exhibition period, the piece would be removed and the site returned 
to Its original condition. 



07/25/91 12:15 2 415 626 7791 CSP BUT P. 06 

6/26/91 Capp Street Project/Mowry Baden Page 6. 

Justin Herman Plaza 

CAPP STREET PROJECT and the OFF-SITE INSTALLATION PROGRAM 

The Capp Street Project Is a non-profit arts organization founded In 1983 as an 
artist-in-residence program. Concleved as an experimental venue for site-specific 
Installation, the residency program continues to provide artist working in diverse 
media an opportunity to create and present new work In San Francisco. Capp Street 
programs have expanded to also Include Off-Site Installations, Experimental Project 
exhibitions, educational workshops, lectures, performances, and other events. 

Mowry Baden's sculpture is being developed under the auspices of Capp Street's 
Off-Site Installation Program with major support from the John D. and Catherine T. 
MacArthur Foundation. The Off-Site Installation Program creates an opportunity each 
year for an artist to create and present a new temporary art installation In the public 
arena. 

HISTORY 

In 1987 and 1988, Capp Street presented its first five Off-Site projects in the 
community. In 1987, San Francisco video artist Tony Labat presented "Es-Que Mata: 
Fat City" that filled an entire floor (17,000 square feet) of the Monadnock Building. 
Based on the successes of Labat's installation, Capp Street reoriented Its entire 
annual program In 1988 to presenting all work in the community. Artists Tim Collins, 
Hung-Liu, Daniel Reeves, and William Maxwell worked with Capp Street to select 
and negotiate the most ideal locations for their Installations Including abandoned 
waterfront pilings, the office for the Chinese for Affirmative Action (formerly San 
Francisco's first bookstore), the nunnery chapel across from Mission Dolores, and 
the lagoon at 1he Palace of Fine Arts (in collaboration with the Exploratorium). 

In 1990, Capp Street chose to develop a much larger public project and with the 
Headlands Center for the Arts and the Society for Arts Publications of the Americas 
collaborated to sponsor "The Halda Project In the Fall of that year. The project's 
focus was the residency of Halda artists, Jim Hart and Reg Davidson, both from the 
Queen Charlotte Islands in British Columbia. Working with two assistants, these 
artists carved a lotem pole and sea going canoe from two massive cedar logs at East 
Fort Baker in the Marin Headlands. With numerous lectures and public events, the 
project Introduced audiences to the processes of making traditional objects from a 
contemporary perspective, considerations common to all indigenous peoples. 

In 1991, Capp Street received a major grant from the MacArthur Foundation 
providing the program with the financial support to present a single temporary public 
Installation each year. Canadian artist Mowry Baden was selected by the 1990 
Advisory Board for Capp Street's 1991 Off-Site Installation Program. 

PROGRAM GUIDELINES 

Recommendations for candidates are solicited fiom staff, artists and arts 
professionals 1rom around the country. After a preliminary staff review, applicants 
are asked to make hypothetical proposals for projects In San Francisco for review at 
the annual advisory board meeting for the Residency and Off-Site Programs. An 
artist (or group of artists) is selected at this meeting to present a single temporary 



07'25'91 



6/26/91 Capp Street Pro)ect/Mowry Baden Page 7. 

Justin Herman Plaza 



installation in the community. The host site is selected by the artist and negotiated 
with Capp Street's assistance for an exhibition period of at least six months. A fixed 
materials/fabrication budget, travel expenses and living stipend are provided by 
Capp Street. Accomodations are the responsibility of the artist. At least one free 
public lecture, performance or event Is conducted In conjunction with each 
Installation. All art works are the property of the artist. 

1990 ADVISORY BOARD 

Ann Hamilton, Installation artist, Santa Barbara; John Handhart, Curator, Whitney 
Museum of American Art; Constance Lewallen, director, Crown Point Press, San 
Francisco; Cesar Trasobares, Director, Dade County Public Art Program, Miami; 
Ursula Von Rydingsvard, sculptor, New York. 



6?--25'91 12:17 



6/26/91 Capp Streel Project/Mowry Baden Page 8. 

Justin Herman Plaza 



BIOGRAPHY 

Mowry Baden 

Born: Los Angeles, 1936 

Bachelor of Arts: Pomona College, 1958 

Masters of Arts: Stanford College, 1965 

Mowry Baden is an experienced public artist having completed commissions for UC, 
Santa Barbara (1981); Art Park, Lewlslon New York (1982); the Washington Project 
for the Arts, Washington D.C. (1986); the J. F. Kennedy Center, Washington D.C. 
(1988); Three Rivers Festival, Pittsburg PA (1988); and the World Trade Center, New 
York (1988). In addition to his proposal for Capp Street, he is currently developing a 
public project for the Seattle Arts Commission for Fisherman's Terminal which is 
scheduled for completion in 1992. 

He has received numerous grants from the Canadian Council for the Arts and the 
National Endowment for the Arts. He was a resident artist at the Exploratorium 
(1987) and the Washington Project for the Arts (1986). In addition to many group 
shows including the Barbican Art Gallery, London England (1991). he has had solo 
exhibitions at the Walter Phillips Art Gallery, Banff, Alberta (1984); Mercer Union, 
Toronto (1987); and MacDonald Stowart Art Gallory, Guelph, Ontario (1988). Later 
this year the San Diego Museum (formerly La Jolla Museum), will highlight the 
artist's work from the late 60s in a one person show. 



07/25'91 12: 17 Z 415 626 7791 

MA^2? '91 9i4A FR0M u u|c miL 



J 



•^ 




CSP BUT P. 89 

PAQE.004 



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ff ^ ft & 

fig 8 " 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Sate 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE AGENDA 



PROGRAM: Arts Commission Gal.lerv 



MAYOR 
Art Agnoi 



PROJECT: Faster, Faster, Kill! Kill 



COMMISSIONERS 

Borbora SVIar 
President 



DESCRIPTION: 



Vernon Aley 
Stanley FJcrvelboum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
Jonn Krtken 
Robert F. LoRocca 
Amalla Meso-Balna. Ph.D. 
Rot Y. Okomoto 
Dodle Rasekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMFJERS 

Presidents of The 
Fine Arti Museum 
Ubrory Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N. Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMcArlColectlon 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public A/1 Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

Sale-Local Partnership 

415-554-9477 

ArfHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



TIME ESTIMATE: 

PRESENTER: 
VISITORS: 



rirrHf-h fr&tn "Ik^ % H1UJi icX/! k;ii[ 









JUL 30 '91' 12=37 415 868 1708" 




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JUL 30 '91 12:38 "415 868 1708 



ML£IWl ARTS 

MUSEUMS OF 

SAN FRANCISCO 



TO: Margie O'Driscoll FAX: 621-3868 

FROM; Harry Parker ( ^L[ 

SUBJECT: Archives of American Art, West Coa3t Regional Office Situation 

DATE: ^ly 10, 1991 



As I believe you have already discussed with Nancy Boas, the 
Smithsonian Institution is closing its Archives of American Art 
office at the de Young Museum after 18 years. While it has been 
an important document gathering and scholarly access point, we do 
realize that the use statistics are Inadequate to justify the 
overall- financial commitment which the Smithsonian has made. For 
many years they have supported a staff of 3 persons together with 
other than personnel costs. 

When informed of their decision to close, I sent the attached 
letter to suggest a compromise whereby the de Young would operate 
the Archives for the Smithsonian at no cost to them. They have 
responded with an unsatisfactory proposal to sell us the total 
archives for a significant price. 

It would help if the Mayor was to initiate an inquiry via his 
Washington contacts. Through a variety of sources we are trying 
to put pressure on the Smithsonian to enter into a discussion of a 
compromise solution. Please contact me if you have any questions. 

HSP:li 
Enclosure 



ccu-4faircy "Boas 



JUL 30 '91 12:38~415 868 1708 

*-¥HS-MNB AHTS 

MUSEUMS OF 

SAN f RANCISCO 

Vi.t\. deWUNCi 

MEMORIAL 

MUSEUM 

CALIFORNIA Lincoln Park 
PALACE OP THE San Francisco, CA 94121 
LEGION OF HONOR (415) 750-3661 



ft&As^ /M 



HARRYS. PARKER III Director of Museums 



6 May 1991 

Dr. Richard Wattenmaker 

Director 

Archives of American Art 

Smithsonian Institution 

Washington, D,C. 20560 

FAX 202/786-2608 

Dear Dr. Wattenmaker: 

Your letter of 16 April brings distressing news for all 
of us involved with American art in Northern California. 
Por^j ghtaen y aar s t h P Archives of AmaHcHn Art have 
played here a central role in the appreciation and study 
of this nation's visual culture. /Museum and academic 
programs , no less than independent scholars, artists and 
their families, and members of the general public, have 
come to rely on the Archives as the basis for work and 
research/ in turn, Northern California has markedly 
advanced the mission of the Archives, augmenting the 
collections with materials of regional and national 
interest while, through course work and publications, 
advancing the study of American art/ It is tremendously 
saddening to see these years of effective association and 
accomplishment threatened with an end. 

in response to the call for ideas and suggestions with 
which you closed your letter, I believe that we can work 
together to satisfy your mandate of rationalizing the 
Archives operations while at the same time maintaining a 
high-visibility presence for the Archives in Northern 
California. I would propose that the microfilm 
collection, card catalogue, readers, and reference aids 
currently in place remain housed in the de Young Museum, 
becoming a component of the museum's library. We would 
assure public access to the collection, a direction in 
which we are already moving with the rest of the library 
facilities. If the Archives would undertake to maintain 
the microfilm collection, updating and providing 
appropriate cataloguing commensurate with that received by 
the. other regional offices, it seems that we would be able 
to continue the research functions of the regional center 
with minimal costs to the Smithsonian Institution. 
Perhaps we could regularize this relationship, designating 
the office here a "Research Center." 



- xc.js, 415 86 g 1?08 

P. 4 



With the research portion of the Archives still in 
place, many of the associated activities that have marked 
the Archives' presence in the community could readily be 
maintained— the Advisory Council, the USArt benefit, the 
For thfl Record exhibitions. These together will also aid 
your goal of continued collecting in the Bay Area which, 
giyen— tfre_j £itailty and Im portance of the region in the art 
-Qf-_t he late r twentieth century, is wholly appropriate. 
This will arise in part through the visibility of the 
Archives and its activities. Even more important, 
however, is the assurance that you can give to an artist 
that the documents of a career will be always accessTBle 
to scholars in this region (an assurance, I suspect, that 
has Tieen- useful in past collecting efforts here and across 
the country ) , 

This plan will necessarily involve the expenditure of 
museum staff time and funds. But so important is the 
Archives to the area's scholarly community, and to the 
survival of what has been built here over the past two 
decades, that I enthusiastically commit those resources to 
its maintenance. The community will greatly miss the 
daily presence of Paul Karlstrom and his staff. But by 
adopting this modified regional center status, thus 
maintaining the good will and collaboration traditional 
between the Archives and The Fine Arts Museums, I believe 
both of our institutions and the region as a whole will be 
well served. 

I look forward to your thoughts on this proposal. 

Vours sincerely, 




Harry S. Parker III 
Director of Museums 



bcc; Paul Karlstrom 
Marc Simpson 



J 



Whereas, the Smithsonian Institute's Western Regional Office 
for the Archives of American Art, located for 18 years at 
the De Young Museum in San Francisco, has been an invaluable 
resource in the region for the study and appreciation of 
this nation's visual arts, and 

Whereas, use of the Archives by Museum curators, academics, 
independent scholars, artists and their families, and the 
general public, has contributed to our greater knowledge and 
deeper understanding of our cultural heritage, and 

Whereas, the Smithsonian's plans to close the Archives here 
will have a detrimental effect on future scholarly study and 
publication, exhibition research and other arts programming, 
and 

Whereas the impact of this action will be to make the 
cultural and intellectual life of the region that much 
poorer, be it therefore 

RESOLVED, that the San Francisco Arts Commission requests 
that the Smithsonian Institute reconsider its decision, and 
urges it to investigate creative alternatives to closing and 
removing the Archives from the area. 



COMPETITIONS FOR NEW PROJECTS WHICH ARE CURRENTLY BEING 
PUBLICIZED 



Tenderloin Recreation Center - Jill Manton 

Ellis O'Farrell Garage - Tonia McNeil 

Bayview Police Station - Jill Manton 

5th and Mission Garage ** Tonia McNeil 

Hospital Parking Garage ** Susan Pontious and/or 

Tonia McNeil 
First Banner Series for 

Market Street Art in Transit - Jill Manton 
Photo Documentation Series 
for Market Street Art in 

Transit - Jill Manton 

Vallejo Parking Garage ** Tonia McNeil 

** The four parking garages were advertised concurrently 
however, only one selection process will be conducted in 
an effort to minimize the amount of time staff spends on 
publicity, responses to inquiries about competitions and 
panel presentations. These 4 projects were grouped 
together because they all involve garages; there is a 
common context in which all of the artists will work. 

The Selection Panel will pre-qualify a number of artist 
candidates whose work will be presented to the Visual Arts 
Committee. The Visual Arts Committee will select an artist 
for the Ellis o'Farrell Garage at the July 31st Visual 
Arts Committee meeting. Materials representing the other 
pre-qual i f ied artists will be retained until the 
appropriate time frame is determined for each of the other 
3 garage projects. 



UPCOMING PROJECTS OR PROJECTS ON HOLD 

Preliminary meetings have already taken place regarding 
the following list of projects. Public Art staff is simply 
unable to accept more work at the present time. At the 
instructions of Acting Director, Margie O'Driscoll, we 
have had to notify project managers that work on these 
projects will be detained for two or more months. 

Taraval Police Station 

Fire Station #2 

Fire Station #37 

Islais Pump Station 

Emergency Coordination Center 

Millbrae Water Facility 

San Bruno Jail Extension 

New MUNI Facility at Islais Creek 

Portsmouth Square 

Richmond Recreation Center 



3) City and County 
of San Francisco 




25 Van Ness Avenue 
'Suite 240 

ISan Francisco. CA 94102 
'(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 






; MAYOR 
ArtAgnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 

Jia Mesa-Bains, Ph.D. 
- Okamoto 
jle Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



AGENDA 

SPECIAL JOINT SESSION: VISUAL ARTS AND CIVIC DESIGN 

COMMITTEES 

3 P.M. 

REGULAR VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

3:30 P.M. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1991 

25 VAN NESS, SUITE 240 

Joint Committee Agenda: 

3:00 I. Review of Embarcadero Promenade Art 
Project 

Presentation by Barbara Stauffacher 
Solomon and Stanley Saitowitz 

See staff report, enclosed 

Regular Visual Arts Committee: 



3:30 I. 
3:35 II 



Approval of July 31 Minutes 

Consent Calendar 

A. Approval $68,000 contract increase 
for Michael Manwaring for work 
specified under Phase II of the 
Ebarcadero Historical and 
Interpretive Signage contract. 

B. Approval of $5,000 Progress Payment 
to Shelley Jurs upon 50% completion 
of art work for Richmond Police 
Station. 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Driscoll 



Note: staff has made studio visit 
to confirm progress . 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Crvlc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 
l 415-554-9677 
ArtHouse 
415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
^ -54-9682 



B. 



VACcage8.28 



Authorization to make final payment 
of $3,500 to artist Jaap Bongers 
upon completion of installation of 
art work for Richmond Police 
Station. 

Authorization to 1 ) extend Jim 
Bernstein contract #2870010 through 
Nov. 30, 1991 and 2) to extend Jim 
Bernstein contract #2890010 through 
Nov. 30, 1991 and increase by 
$1,987.50 to cover the balance of 



Page - 1 



conservation work at SFIA; and 
approve final payment on this 
contract . 

E. Approval of Gail Reed, Director of 
Bayview Opera House as a voting 
member of the Artist Selection Panel 
for the the Bayview Police Station. 

See staff report, enclosed 

F. Motion to formalize Arts Commission 
Policy to seek input and advice on 
Art Enrichment Projects from 
appropriate City Departments in the 
evaluation of project proposals 
relative to safety issues, 
maintenance, and seismic and 
engineering requirements. 

G. Motion to rescind $3,500 from 
contract with Delaney and Cochran, 
which was to habe been expended for 
bill board and poster design, 
because these items have been 
officially deleted from the Design 
Team's scope of work. 

3:40 III. Artist Initiated Projects 

A. "Clouds of Witness", mural project 
by Susan Cervantes, Selma Brown and 
Ron Goodman, proposed for gym of 
Ingleside Community Center. 

See project support letter, enclosed 
Staff recommendation : approval 

B. "Plume" by John Ammirati, charcoal 
land drawing proposed for 
Candlestick Point State Recreation 
Area, with small projection on one 
block section of Hawes Street 
between Van Dyke and Underwood. 

See project description, enclosed 
Staff recommendation: approval 



VACcage8.28 Page - 2 



C. "Goddess of Democracy"; Thomas Marsh 
Approval of pedastal material and 
color 

4:00 IV. Vallejo St. and Hospital Parking 
Garages 

Guest: Kevin Haggerty, Dept . of Parking 

and Traffic 

Artist Selection 

See staff report, enclosed 

4:30 V. Muni Metro Portal Turnaround Project 

Panelist recommendations 

4:35 VI. Market St. 

Review of proposed programming and budget 

4:50 VII. Gallery 

A. Approval of theme, selected artists 
and proposed works for "Faster, 
Faster, Kill! Kill!", or Alternate 
show proposed by Gallery Curator. 

B. Chain Reaction VII, Dec. 20 - Feb. 
15 

See project descriptions , enclosed 

5:20 VIII. Moscone/ Howard St. 

Project update 

5:30 IX. Library 

A. Alice Aycock proposal 

B. Lothar Baumgarten fee and proposal 
See staff report, enclosed 

5:45 X. San Andreas I 

Presentation of example photographs to be 
installed in various water Department 
offices . 

XI. For Information Only: 

A. Emarcadero Gateway: 

Presentation of Finalists: Monday, 
Sept. 30, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
See staff report, enclosed 



VACcage8.28 Page - 3 



B. Richmond Police Station: 
Building dedication: Wed., Sept. 18 
at 11:15 a.m. 

C. New Sheriff's Facility: 

Ground breaking: August 29, 11 a.m. 

D. Airport Art Steering Committee 
Minutes ( enclosed) . 



5:55 XII. Old Business 
6:00 Adjournment 



VACcage8.28 Page 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

tan Francisco. CA 94102 

415)554-9671 

AX #621-3868 



MINUTES 

SPECIAL, JOINT SESSION: VISUAL ARTS AND CIVIC DESIGN 

COMMITTEES 

AUGUST 28, 199J 

The meeting' was called to order at 3:15 p.m. 



4AYOR 
\rt Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sldar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Aley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Genny Um 

Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Ral Y. Okamoto 
-e Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission , 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Wlnshlp 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMc Art Collection 
CMC Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
'OPS Symphony Concerts 
\ibllc Art Program 
itreet Artists Ucenses 



ulte430 

late-Local Partnership 

15-554-9677 

vtHouse 

15-554-9679 



Vrts Commission Gallery 
55 Grove Street 
115-554-9682 




wi tli 



Commissioners Present: 

Anne Hea 1 y 
John Kriken 
Barbara Sklar 
Nancy Boas 
Bob LaRocca 
Rai Okamoto 

Staff Present: 

Joanne Chow Kinship, Director 
Jill Man ton 
Tonia Macneii 
Susan Pontious 

I. Review of Embarcadero Promenade Project 

Jill Manton introduced Stanley Saitowitz and Barbara 
S tauf f acher-Solomon , members of the Design Team alon: 
Vito Acconci, for the Embarcadero Promenade Project. 
Saitowitz and Solomon described and showed drawings of 
their revised proposal, which involves a clearly defined, 
5 ft. wide line of contrasting paving material running the 
length of the southern end of the Promenade. Along the 
line will be a series of variously combined elements: 
seats, ramps and stairs, which would rise above or intrude 
into the sidewalk. Like rocks at the beach, p^opLe would 
inhabit and use the structures for different purposes. 
The height or depth of the structures would be a maximum 
of 30" and the width would he consistent 1 y 5'. Planned 
bollards would be replaced with raised 5 1 square slabs of 
concrete 6" i n height, thus creating a consistenl minimal 
language and preserving the clear, flat I ine created b> 
the expanse of water. In order to acknowledge the 
presence of the water', where it is visible , street Lamp 
poles would lean at an angle. The specific degree to 
which they would Lean would be detemined by cit.\ codes. 

The Joint Commi 1 1 ee expressed the following concerns : 



1 . 
2. 



The below-grade areas represent a safety hazard 
All safety issues should he carefully studied . 



vac-MTN8.91 



Page - 1 



3. The team should clearly understand and anticipate the 
future planned uses of the marginal wharf and how 
their proposed art project will relate to them. 

1. Unforeseen changes in use inaj occur. The design 
shun J d L>e flexible and modular in order to 
accommodate an unknown future. 

5. The rationale for the leaning lamp posts is unclear. 
If there is no t a strong pattern and rationale , they 
will appear to be a mistake. Current ly the concept 
of a "Chain of Light" is meant to provide a strong 
visual continuity along tin- Embarcadero . 

Additionally it was suggested that the bollards be at 
least 12" high and that the line element at the west end 
of the Promenade emphasize a route into Rincon Park rather 

than toward downtown. 



ac-MINH. <J1 




M 1 NU'I'ES 

5 Van Ness Avenue VISUAL, ARTS COMM I T'l' EK 

"»e240 AUGUST 28, 1991 

3n Francisco. CA 94102 

115)554-9671 

V(#62i-3868 The meeting was called to order at 3:45 

Commissioners Present: 
Anne Healy - Chair 
Nancv Boas 

AYOR D . „. . 

rtAgnos Barbara Sklar 

Robert LaRocca 

OMMissiONERS Staff Present: 

arbaraSWar Joanne Chow Kinship, Director 

r9Sldent Jill Man ton 

lETlrtlSSL. Susan Pontious 

Tonia Macneil 



Ice President 



'emon Alley 

taniey Eicheibaum Anne Meissner 
)anlel Genera 
\nne Healy 

lohnKrlken I. Minutes lor July 31, 1991 

SenTrvUm ca Commissioner Sklar moved to approve the Committee minutes 
Amelia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. of Julv 31, 1991 . Commissioner Boas seconded. It was so 

Rol Y. Okamoto moved 

.Rosekrans muveu. 

II. Consent Calendar 

: .x officio members The following items were on the consent calendar: 

'residents of the 

ine Arts Museum A Approval of $(i8.000 contract increase 'or 

Ibrary Commission, 

lanning Commission. Michael Manwanng for work specified under Phase 11 ol the 

©creation and Park Embai'cadero Historical and Interpre I ive Signage contl-act. 

.ommisslon 

iiRECTOROF " ' Approval of 55,0 00 progress Payment to 

ultural affairs Shelley Jurs upon 5o% complet ion of art work for Richm 

janne Chow Winshlp Police Station. 

?P? R £ M ? C. Authorization to make final payment of 

rts Festivals 

Mc Art Collection $3,50(1.00 to artist Jaap Bongers upon completion of 

vie Design Review installation of art work for Richmond Police Station. 

3lghborhood Arts 

)PS Symphony Concerts 

^Artish^en^es D " Authorization to 1) extend Jim Bernstein 

contract #2870010 through November 10, 1991 and 2) to 
extend Jim Bernstein con t r act #2890010 t h rough Novembei 
te-Locai Partnership 30, 1991 and increase bj $1 ,987.50 to rover balance 
-554-9677 conservation work at SFIA; and approve final paymenl on 

House 

r554-9679 this contract. 

s Commission Gallery 
5 Grove Street 
5-554-9682 



vac-MIN8.9] Page 



E. Approval of GaiJ Reed, Director of Bayview 
Opera House as a voting member of the Artist. Selection 
Panel for the Bayview Police Stal Lon. 

p. Motion to formalist Arts Commission Policy 
to seek input and advice on Art Enrichment Projects from 
appropriate ( ity Departments in the evaluation of project 
proposals relative to safety issues, maintenance, and 
seismic and engineering requirements, 

G. Motion to rescind $3,500 for contract with 
Delaney and Cochran, which was to have been expended for 
bill hoard and poster design, because these items have 
been officially deleted from the Design Team's scope of 

work. 



Item F. was removed from the consent calendar at the 
request of Commissioner Boas. Commissioner Sklar moved to 
approve the consent calendar as amended. Commissioner 



Boas seconded , 



The aves were unanimous 



III. Artist Initiated Project: Mural 

Artist Susan Cervantes presented the proposed mural design 
by herself, Selma Brown and Ron Goodman en1 it led "Clouds 
o f Witness" to be painted on the upper wall of the gym at 
the Ingleside Community Center. The mural includes 
portraits of African and African-American historical 
figures. The primary users of the gym will be African 
American youth. Commissioner llealy moved to approve the 
mural as proposed. Commissioner Sklar seconded. The ayes 
were unanimous. 



IV. 

John Ammi 
draw i ng t 
Point Sta 
drawing w 
between V 
permi ssi o 
already b 
It i s a t 
sprayed o 
The dates 
1991 . 

i 'ommiss io 
Commi ss i o 



Artist Initiated Project: hand Drawing 
rati presented his proposal for a charcoal land 
o be located on State property at the Candlestick 
te Recreal Lon Area. Because a small part of the 
ill protrude onto city property at llawes Street 
an Dyke and Underwood, the artist requested 
n of the Arts Commission. The project has 
een approved by the Stale of California and DPW . 
emporary installation, made of charcoal and water 
n the ground, which will wash away in the rain. 

of the project are September 28 to October 27, 

tier llealy moved to ipprove the artist's request, 
ner Sklar seconded. 1 he axes were unanimous. 



\ ac-MLN8. l J 



V. Artist. Initialed Project: Goddess of Democracy 

Tom Marsh and Patrick Lau presented a slab of lightly 
textured Sierra While Granite, the material proposed for 
the base of the Goddess o (' Democracy statue to be located 
in Portsmouth Square. Commissioner Healy moved to accept 
the material as proposed. Commissioner Sklar seconded. 
I t was so moved . 

VI. Visual Arts Committee Policy: Artist Initiated 
Pro jec ts 

Commissioner Healy requested that the Committee consider a 
new policy in regard to approval of artist initiated 
proposals such as murals and other non-Commission 
generated projects. She suggested that approval could be 
obtained by staff review only, with only problematic 
proposals brought to the Committee. On a motion by 
Commissioner Healy, seconded by Commissioner Sklar, the 
Committee unanimously agreed to the new policy. 

VII. Municipal Parking Garages: Vallejo Street and 
New Hospital Garages 

Tonia Macneil presented slides of the six semi - f i nal i sts 
for the Municipal Parking Garages. The semi-finalists 
are: Beliz Brothers, Anne Chamberlain, Sue-Chen Hung, B.J. 
Krivanek, Vicki Scuri and AL Wong. The art enrichment 
budget for the Vallejo Street Garage is $50,000, and for 
the Hospital Garage is $80,000. The Commission selected 
artist Anne Chamberlain for the Hospital Garage and Sue- 
Chen Hung for the Vallejo Garage. Commissioner Boas moved 
to approve the select ion, Commissioner Sklar seconded. 
The ayes were unanimous. 



VIII. 
Galler 
curato 
Kill! 
month ' 
for re 
the ar 
been m 
La Roc 
exh ib i 
physic- 
artist 
Mr. La 
to be 
a dial 
deny t 



Arts 
Directo 
for the 
11!", a 
meet i ng 
ew by t 
si's wo 
led to 

asked 
on. Co 

a r rang 
an. I how 
t Jell 
v o 1 v e d . 
vie with 

exh i I) i 



Commi ssi 
r Anne M 

propose 
nd repor 

had bee 
he ( 'omm i 
iks I o b 
the Co mm 
t hat a I I 
mm i ss i on 
etnen t o f 

I he ;nl 

t In' i ■' " 'in 
AS I he 

t he 
t ion 



on 
e i s 
d e 
I ed 

n r 

t I e 
e P 

I s s 

\ i 

ers 

I I. 
i si 



in i t 

Minn 



Gall 

sner 

xhib 

tha 

urth 

e . 

rese 
i one 
deos 

as 
e sp 
s W e 
a j in 
rat o 
lee, 
l s s i 



ery 

int i 
i t ion 
t the 
e r de 

A de 
nl e d 
is i n 

be i 

ei] qll 
ace , 
re se 

g I ha 
!• did 
i 'oilitn 
one r 



d u c e d 
"Fast 
propo 

velope 

1 ailed 
i n I Ili- 
ad van 

e v i e w e 
es I i c .ii 

i he ba 

I el ed 

t he n 

not w 

■ 
l 1 1 1 ii 



Tony 
er Pus 
sal ma 
d and 
de s c r 
exh i I. 
ce . C 
d by s 
s cone 
ckgrou 

\ 
o L o n si 
i sh t o 
er Ilea 
:i seco 



La bat , 
syca t ! 
de at last 
was read 
iption of 
i I ion had 
ommi s 1 - 
t a f f i 
e in i ng I he 
nd o1 the 
this po i n I 
e r wished 
enter Into 
1 y mov .1 I ' 
nded . 1 he 



vac -MINK. 9 1 



Page 



ayes were unanimous. Commissioner boas staled that she 
did not. intend offense to the curator by her questions and 
that Tony Labat is held in great respect as an important 
a r t i s t . 

Meissner then presented an alternate exhibition for the 
same time period. She showed slides of multi-media pieces 
by Toi Hoang , a Vietnamese boat person, and xeroxes of 
work by two other artists. The Commit tee asked that the 
Gallery Director show slides of other artists' work before 
the monthly Arts Commission meeting on September 4. The 
exhibition will run from October 21 to December 6, 1991. 
The Commissioners expressed their interest in the 
development of this concept. 

Meissner reminded the Commissioners of the Gallery opening 
on Thursday evening, August 29. 

"Chain Reaction VII" is scheduled for December 20 through 
February 15. Director Meissner proposed that the format 
for selection of artists be changed and offered two 
alternatives. Commissioner HeaJy moved to approve the 
concept of the Chain Reaction Exhibition ( Commissioner 
Sklar seconded. The ayes were unanimous. The Committee 
will review the selection process at the next regular 
monthly meeting. 

IX. Market Street Art in Transit Program 
Jill Manton introduced Eleanor Beaton, who has been 
working as Jill's assistant on I lie Market Street Art in 
Transit Program. Eleanor explained the "seeding" projects 
which have been de\eloped to introduce the program and 
infornieel Commissioners as to their progress: 

1 . the Eco-Rap concej L is scheduled for 2 p.m. on 
September 7, 1991 in Justin Herman Plaza. The completed 
poster was displayed for the Committee's information. 

2. The bus shelter poster series which will feature 
the public art quest iona irre is about to begin. The first 
poster are at the printers and will be installed in about 

t w o weeks . 

3. The logo for the Market Street Art. m Transit 
Program lias been developed and was shown to the Committee. 



vac-MIN8 . 9 1 



I. The first two competitions for temporary 
projects are in process. The deadline is August 29, 1991. 
A screening of applicants will be held in late September. 

Jill Manton reported on the status of the long-term 
permanent projects. The (astro Theatre Organ Project is 
moving forward. The Commission has been given permission 
by the theatre to study the sound engineering issues 
related to Lmp.lementat ion, and staff is working t 
identify a sound engineer for the task. Artist Bill 
Font ana has been recommended by a number of different, 
sources as the most qualified person. 



The Ma rke t S t ree t 
on September 6. 



Art Master Plan will go to the printer 



Staff 

i nclud 
It is 
rotate 
pro jec 
approv 
pro jec 
The to 
and i I 
felt i 
Commi t 
or the 
the Di 
budget 



i s be 
ing t 
hoped 

t he 
t at 
a I of 
t s an 
ta 1 f 

L s e 
t w i 1 
tee h 

budg 
recto 
a ry i 



g l n n i 

he bo 

that 

pos t o 
t he E 
a $5 
d the 
und i n 
xpec t 
1 be 
ad no 
et, 1 
x' sho 
s sues 



ng t 
okca 

the 
i • s a 
mba r 
,00 

fir 
g av 

od t 

poss 
pro 

ul d 

uld 
and 



o ann 
se de 
re w i 

t Can 
cader 

bud 

si III 

a i I a 1 1 
hat o 
ible 
blem 
eel in 
re\ ie 
pj an 



ounce various permanent projects 

sign and poetry in. the sidewalk. 

II still lie an opport uni t y to 

not t . There will be a temporary 

o site. Manton requested 

got for- 6 months of seeding 

ree years of permanent projects. 

Ie for Market Street is $300,000, 

nee the impact of the program is 

to raise more money. The 

with either the projects proposed 

e d to take action stating that 

w this relative to other 

s . 



X. Muni MM.ro Portal Turnaround Project 

Jill Manton requested that the Committee identify Ion 
panelists and a Commission liaison to make up a Selec 
Panel for the Muni-Metro Portal Projed . \n ar1 ist w 
be hired to work direct ly with Bechtel engineers ivei 
period of one and one-half years to design the abov< 
ground structure. The design fee ["or the projed is 
$50,000, anil additional fees will be pant if Lhe arti 
involved in form or' fabrication work on the projeel . 
The Committee selected Cathy Simon, Jessica Cusick, T 
Levy and Patricia Rnvarra as panel LstSi and Nancy Boa 
the Commission 1 i a i son . Commi ssj oner Ilea I \ moved to 
approve the panel and Commissioner SkLar seconded. I 
aves were unanimous. 



t i on 

i 1 1 



ob> 

s a s 



va.-MIMH.9l 



Page - 



XI. New 
Susan Pontious 
for the 1 i brar 
spi rai s La i rca 
floors and a h 
stainless stee 
f nrni I 11 re and 
accommodate th 
volunteered to 
architect Cath 
proposal , sayi 
the rectilinea 
project is exp 
requested appr 
artis t ' s desig 
approval of th 
Commissiner Bo 



Main Library 

presented A Lice Aycock's revised proposal 
y. The piece involves two main parts, a 
se leading from the fourth to the fifth 
anging element above. The materials will be 
L i glass and aluminum. A rearrangement of 
stack units will be necessary in order to 
e artwork, and the architects have 

develop a revised furnishing plan. Project 
y Simon stated her support of the artist's 
ng that the piece acts as a counterpoint to 
r design of the building. Cost of the 
ected to be about $350,000. Pontious 
oval of a $3,000 final payment on the 
n contract. Commissioner Sklar moved 
e artist's design and final payment . 
as seconded. It was so moved. 



Susan I 
Lothar 
artist 
flat de 
Commi tt 
and in 
artist 
are no 
staff i 
for a f 
the Vis 
Commi tt 
they iv o 
$85 ,000 
July Ba 
addi t i o 
1'onti ou 
1 . Acce 
negot i a 
A 1 local 



ont 

Bau 

pre 

sig 

ee 

the 

und 

Ion 

n o 

ee 

ua 1 

ee 

ii Ld 



na i 
s o 
Pt 

te 



1 ous 
mgar 
sent 
n f e 
dire 
me a 
erwe 
ger 
rder 
t ) e I w 

A r L 
di re 

be 
a I . h e 
ar 1 e 

$ 10 
nl 1 i 
t he 
f o r 
o re 



gave 
ten's 
ed fi 

of 
cted 
nt ime 
n t re 
f e a s i 

to f 

ecll $ 
S Com 

.1 ed 
amena 
v tha 
n sen 
, 000 
ne. I t 
propo 
a pre 
money 



bac 

c u r 

ve i 

betw 
staf 

two 
v i s i 
ble. 
u r th 
1 50 , 
in i t t 
staf 
ble 
n fi 
t a 
in t 
hi ee 
sa 1 ; 
viou 

For 



kgro 
rent 
deas 
een 
f to 

of 
oris , 
I 
er d 
000 
ee , 
f l o 
to o 
ve a 
rev i 
rave 

pos 

2 

s de 

one 



und 
pr 
fo 
$15 
of 
the 
so 
n J 
i st- 
and 
but 



CO 

ne 

s s 

sed 
I a 
sib 
. H 
sig 



|ec 

at 
10 l i 



ma t. i 

ect s 

to $ 
des i 
pro 
two 
he a 
i I e 

ODD 

en i e 
at >■ 

pro 
ed i 
sa] 

d Le 

i he 
he s 
new 



on on 

n Februar 
, and ask 
200 ,000 . 
gn fee of 
posed by 
of his co 
rtist met 
es . His 
was submi 
d . 1 1 1 i w < ■ v 

tO L 1 1 > :il 

posals fo 
ii Februar 
and asked 
m expense 

at tlii 
proposal 
ame price 
l deas . 



y 20, the 
ed for a 

The 

$85 ,000, 
the 
ncepts 

with 
request 
t t ed to 
er, the 
tist that 
r the 
y . In 

for an 
s . 

point : 
and 
; or , 3 . 



The Committee asked for comments from Cathj Simon, who 
stated that the architects were enthusiastic about the 
artist's interest in the history, of the design of books in 
western societj and also about the simple elegance of his 
designs. The architects are most interested in the 
artist's graphic images dealing w i t h the proportions of 
the book. 



vac-MIN8. <H 



A discussion fo] lowed 
relation I n design wor 
belief that the artist 

either the original do 



■oncoming appropriate fees in 
;. Commissioner Boas stated h< 
should be p>aid more money for 
; i gns or new ones . 



It was suggested thai the Committee offer- i lie artist the 
original fee of $85,000 plus $10, 000 in additional 
expenses for one to three of the artist's designs 
originally proposed in February of 1991. The 
Commissioners reviewed and selected the three possible 
designs. Commissioner Healy moved to approve the 
suggestion, and Commissioner Sklar seconded. 
Commissioners Healy and Sklar voted yes, and Commissioner 
Boas voted no. Commissioner LaRocca had departed before 
the vote. The motion passed. 

XII. San Andreas Water Treatment, Plant Expansion #1 

PUC photographs will tie installed in several Water 
Department, offices as a result of Expansion 3 1 Art 
Enrichment funds. Five of the framed photographs were on 
display for the Committee's information and approval. 
Commissioner Boas moved to approve the photographs for 
installation. Commissioner- Sklar seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 



XIII. 

Jill Man 
public h 
that the 
at a spe 
concerns 
along wi 
process . 
of staff 
through 
made awa 
associat 
decision 
The Comm 
artists 
they dec 



Moscone Cente 

ton asked the C 
ear ing w i t h t he 

Civic Design C 
c ial meet ing on 

would be passe 

th a descriptio 

A major' conce 

time and avail 
an envi rorimen ta 
re of t tie t i me , 
ed with t he i r p 

as to whether 
i tt ee asked t ha 
the opportuni t y 
ide not to cont 



r/IIoward Sfree 

omm i t tee to se 

oscone artis 

ommi t tee would 

Friday, Angus 
d on in a lett 
n of the Major 
rn to the Comm 
ability of f u n 
1 rev iew . The 

money and sue 
roposal in ord 
to move forwar 
t t he Man ton ' s 

to make a new 
inue with the 



t a dat e for the 
ts. She explained 

review the proposal 
t 30, 1991 and their 
er to the artists 

Encroachment and EIR 
ission is the amount 
ding necessary to go 

artists should be 
cess factors 
er for them to make a 
d w i th the project . 

letter offer the 

proposal , shou Id 
current one . 



The meeting was adjourned at 6:05 p.m. 



vac-MIN8.91 



Page 



REPORTS AND ORDERS 



1 . ( irdered : ^ppro-\ aJ 

Visual Arts Committee Meet ing 
Moved: Commissioner Skiar 
Vote : Unan imous 



if in i nut es of July 31 , 1991 



2. Ordered: Approval of 568,000 contracl increase 
for Michael Manwaring for work specified under Phase 11 of 
Lhe Embarcadero HistoricaJ and Interpretive Signage 
contract. 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 
Vol e : Unani mous 

3. Ordered: Approval of $5,000 progress payment to 
Shelley Jurs upon 50% compJetion of art work for Richmond 
l'i 1 1 i ce Station. 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 
Vote: Unanimous 

1. (irdered: Authorizal ion Lo make final payment of 

$3,500 to artist Jaap Bongers upon completion of 
instaLiat ion of art work a i Richmond Police Station. 
Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Authorizal Lon to 1 ) extend Jim 
Bernstein contract 52870010 through November 30, 1991 and 
2) to extend Jim Bernstein contract #2890010 through 
November. 30, 1991 and incn ise bj $1,987.50 to cover the 
balance of conservat ion work at M-1A; and approve final 
payment on this contract . 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 
Vol . • : Unanimous 

6. Ordered: Approval of Gail Reed, Director of 
Ba; \ iew Opera House as a vol ing member of the Artists 
Selection 1'anel for the Bayview Police Station. 
Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vo te : Unan imous 

7. i inlered: To rescind $3,500 from contract with 
Delanej and Cochran, which was to have been expended for 
hi LI hoard and poster design. 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vote: Unanimous 



ac-MIN8. 91 



Page - 10 



8. Ordered: Approval ol "Clouds of Witness" mural 
concept and design by Susan Cervantes, Selma Brown and Ron 
Goodman for gym of ingleside Community Center. 
Moved: \nne Healy 
Vote : Unan i mous 



9. Ordered: 
Street of one part c 
John Aiiuni rat i f o r t I 
Area . 

Moved: Anne Heal; 
Vote : 1 nan i mous 



Approval of the projection onto Hawes 
f a charcoal land drawing "Plump" , by 
e Candlestick Point State Recreation 



10. Ordered: Approval of new Committee policy 
regarding artist-initiated proposals: Proposals will be 
reviewed and approved on staff level and will be brought 
to the Committee only if there is a perceived problem. 
Moved: Anne Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

11. Ordered: Approval of sierra white granite with 
lightly textured surface as the pedestal material for the 
Goddess of Democracy to be located in Portsmith Square . 
Moved: Anne Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

12. Ordered: Approval of artist Su-Chen Hung to 
design a work of art for the Yallejo Street parking garage 
and authorization to the Director to enter into contract 
with the artist for an amount not to exceed S50,000. 
Moved: Anne Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

13. Ordered: Approval of artist Anne Chamberlain to 
design a work of art for the Hospital Parking Garage and 
authorization to the Director to enter into contract with 
the artist, for an amount not to exceed S80,000. 

Moved: Anne Healy 
Vote : Unan i mous 

14. Ordered: Acceptance of gue^.t curat 
withdrawal and denial of Arts Commission Gallery proposal 
for exhibition entitled " Faster i Faster i Kill! Kill!". 
Moved: Anne Healy 

Vote : Unan i mou s 



vac-MIN8.<)l 



Page - 1 1 



15. Ordered: Approval of group exhibit for the Arts 
Commission Gallery for October 2 4 to December 6, 1991. 
Approval of artist Toi Hoang . 

Moved: Anne Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

16. Ordered: Approval of Chain Reaction VII for 
December 20, 1991 to February 15, 1992. 

Moved: Anne Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

17. Ordered: Approval of Cathy Simon, Jessica 
Cusick, Toby Levy and Patricia Ravarra as panelists along 
with Nancy Boas as Commission Liaison for the Muni Metro 
Portal Turnaround Project, and authorization to pay 
panelists an honorarium for their services. 

Moved: Anne Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

18. Ordered: Approval of Alice Aycock's design 
proposal for works of art within the New Main Library, and 
authorization to make the final payment of $3,000 on her 
design contract. 

Moved: Barbara Sklar 
Vote: Unanimous 

19. Ordered: Authorization to pay a design fee of 
$85,000 plus $10,000 in travel expenses to Lothar 
Baumgarten for one to three designs originally proposed by 
the artist in February of 1991. 

Moved: Anne Healy 
Vote: 2 ayes: Sklar and Healy 
1 nay: Boas 

20. Ordered: Approval of examples of photographs 
and authorization to install in Water Department offices 
as part of Art Enrichment for San Andreas Water Treatment 
Plant, Expansion si. 

Moved: Nancy Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 



vac-MlN8. 91 



Page - 1 2 



3~oi\aV Se.'ss, te-vA 2H 





Date: August 18, 1991 

To: Members of the Visual Aits Committee 

/an Ness Avenue 

to 240 

i Francisco, ca 94102 From: Jill Manton, Director, Public Art Program 

5)554-9671 
X# 621-3868 

He: Status of Embarcadero Promenade Project 

I would like to document the progress and evolution of the 
AYOR artists' proposal for the Kmbarcadero Promenade project. 

gno1 Mj earliest correspondence with the artists about the 

project identified a number of concerns, questions and 
commissioners constraints that they were asked to address. In order to 

arbarasidai do so, the artists had to obtain drawings from both 

resident Department of Public Works and the Port which would 

■lancyBcos reflect seawall locations, project boundaries, sidewalk 

/ice President elevations, furniture and lightpost placement, etc. 

Vernon Aley 
Stanley FJchelbaum 

Genny Lim At the suggestion of Port engineering staff, the artists 

Sr^ehSry ' engaged a structural engineer familiar with the Port's 

johnKrtken regulations and with the seawall/pier constructions. At 

l ^toM«a^5nj Pn D Lne same time, they translated their initial design into a 

' ?Ot<omoto subsequent drawing which responded to curb cuts, pier 

_ _ Je Rosekrara entrances, etc. After identifying the seawall locations, 

which often occurred at the outer edge of the 25 foot wide 
promenade, the artists realized that the promenade would 
have to be extended approximately 5 feet into the marginal 
Fine Am Museum wharf in order to make their grate/sidewalk removal 

Library Commission, function as a viable idea. This obviously raised the issue 

Planning Commission, . * 

Recreation and Park or extending the geographic: boundaries ot the Waterfront 

Commission Transportation projects to accomodate their proposal which 

loanne Chow winshlp would involve additional costs and maintenance issues. 
Urector o£ Cultural 

££airs Another issue was raised about the Limited visibility a 

,__„.,_ pedestrian would have through the narrow slots required by 

JOGRAMS to £• ii. t> 

rsFesttvais City codes for grates which function as walking surfaces. 

te Art Coiection Through their research, the artists located a grate with 

tc Design Review ° . , . , ,, . - ~ . 

jhborhood Arts circular openings, which would apparently satisfy City 

^Symphony Concerts requ j rerneri t.s as well as provide greater visibility of the 

lie Art Program ' 

at Artists Licenses water below. 

a430 The artists responded to the concerns articulated by the 

te-LccaiPortnership city's Disabled Task force by relocating their bench wall 

)-554-9677 , . , . 

rHouse to a curb-side location, thus allowing greater pedestrian 

5-554-9679 mobility within the promenade and l>> modifj ing the design 

of the bench wall to feature niches thai would allow 
Arts Commission Gallery persons in wheel i -hairs to sit adjacent to persons using 

155 Grove Street *" .... . ., , . -. , 

^^54-9682 the bench wall. In add i t ion, they agreed to modify their 
bench wall design to ramp down to an elevation no less 
than 6 inches above the lewl of tin- sidewalk in deference 
to the concerns of the disabled. 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 



It was not until August 6th, when a meting occurred 
between the artists, their structural engineer and the 
Port that the artists learned the extent of the structural 
reinforcement required to protect the piers and seawall 
if the artists were to implement their grate concept. They 
voluntarily concluded, at that point, that it would be far 
too costly an idea to implement and decided to focus on 
the bench wall and bay trough concepts. 

At a subsequent Artist/Project. Manager meeting organized 
by the CAO ' s office, the artists were first advised of the 
possible problem related to drawing arid discharging bay 
water. In response to concerns raised about the kind of 
water pump to be used, the artists hired a consultant who 
recommended a device entitled the Archimedian Screw. 
Although it does have an electric motor, it is supposedly 
a low maintenance and durable item. 

As of today, I have advised one of the artists, Barbara 
Stauf facher Solomon, of Rudy Nothenberg's strong objection 
to t.he trough, a principal aspect of their project. 
Apparently Mr. Nothemberg is extremely concerned about the 
maintenance that will be required on an ongoing basis and 
about the potential problem associated with the discharge 
of dirty trough water into the bay. We have scheduled a 
special meeting of the Visual Arts and Civic Design 
Committees on August 28th at 3:00 PM at which time the 
artists will be asked to respond to all of the concerns 
previously raised. Now thai 2/3s of their- original concept 
has been deleted because it was either- too costly or 
problematic! 1 propose that I he Commission consider 
issuing a preliminary design concept a I this point to 
cover- the costs associated I he development of the original 
and revised proposals. A separate design development and 
working drawing cont ract can be issued at a subsequent 
date, if the revised design meels with t lie approval of the 
Commission, BCDC and the Port . 

The on I .\ other alternative would be to compensate the 

ail isls for- their t i me ami expenses to date and offer the 

commission lo the Buster Simpson It-am, who were close 
contenders mil il i Iil- very last moment. 

cc : Commissioner John Kriken 
Commissioner Rai Okamoto 
Joane chow Winshi p 



RUG 27 '91 03= 05PM ACCONCI 



The promenade is considered here as a line at the edge of the city: 
a line that borders the city, a line you walk at the edge of the city. 

The line is condensed and embodied under your feet, a literal line that 
stretches out before you and behind you as you walk: a five-foot-wide 
Strip of pavement, the size of the existent grid, is separated by 
color from the rest of the pavement — it's green, maybe a green that 
tends toward blue, a sparkling green, concrete speckled with silicone 
carbonate, a green-blue line that catches the sun like water. This 
line on the ground, confined to the pavement grid, shifts as the 
promenade curves: when it begins, in front of the firehouse, it's 
closer to the sidewalk edge -- as it continues itldrifts out to the 
middle of the promenade — by the time it ends, at Pier 38, it's at 
the far edge, it makes the far edge of the promenade, alongside the 
wharf. 

For the most part, the line continues down the middle of the promenade 
ground, a cut through the promenade, an arrow across the promenade. 
On either side of the line are shorter lines, interrupted lines — 
dashes — one-hundred-twenty feet long, twenty-four grid squares 
long, parallel to the continuous line: one dash/line at street-edge, 
one dash/Hne at wharf-edge. The dash/lines are arteries, by-ways, 
to the highway of the continuous line. These dash/lines take shape, 
gain mass and volume, rise up out of the pavement: the line is a 
wall here, two-and-a-half feet high, it stays five feet wide, the 
top of the wall is the glittering green-blue line. 

The line-become-wall is a block that's carved into, making notches 
for benches and ramps and stairs. The wall is the base-form that, 
each time it's built, appears in a different variation: it's all wall, 
or it's a wall notched out for a single long bench, or for a crlss-cfoss 
of ramps, or a criss-cross of stairs, a combination of stairs and rampsi 
different complexes of ramps and benches of all sizes and stairs all 
together. 

At the end, Just before Pier 38, where the green line of pavement has 
wandered over to become the far edge of the pavement, and toward the 
beginning, in front of Pier 26, where the green line is closer to 



HUG 27 '91 03:05PM flCCOMCI 



the sidewalk edge, the green line itself rises into the wall that in 
turn becomes a bench and ramp and stairway. 

These walls serve, as a by-product, the function of bollards: they 
kaep cars from driving out onto the wharf. When there isn't a wall, 
and there's a necessity for a bollard, every other square of pavement 
a£t the edge of the promenade is raised six inches off the ground, 
making a barrier: these steps/platforms/bollards are dots that 
precede or follow the dashes of the walls. 

The green line is maintained as a horizontal surface: the ground, 
Che top of e wall, the surface of a ramp, the seat of a bench, the 
tread of a stair, the top of a step/platform/bollard. 

The line of the promenade is at the edge of the city. This is taken 
literally here, it's made to be as true as possible: the line is at 
the edge, it's made to be almost over the edge. Wherever the 
promenade faces the bay, faces uninterrupted water, where there ere 
no pier buildings, the block of wall/bench/ramp/stairway slants, at a 
Sixty-degree angle — the wall tilts out toward the bay. The short 
walls, the steps/platforms that function as bollards — these follow 
the taller walls and tilt with them. The promenade is part of the city 
but also apart from the city: it*3 the end of the city, the city 
about to disappear into water — the slanted walls lean the promenade, 
lean the city, out into the bay. 

The existent street-lights that run down the promenade fall into our 
scheme: when a wall happens to be in the path of the street-lights, 
the street-light is embedded within the wall — when the street-lights 
pass in front of an uninterrupted view of the bay, the street-lights 
slant along with the walls, they're pulled away from the perpendicular 
row of streetlights and they tilt east, as if bending over the bay, 
falling toward the bay, looking over the bay, guarding the bay. 






STAFF REPORTS. AUGUST 1991 
CONSENT CALENDAR 

PROJECT: Richmond Police Station 

PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macneil 

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE: September 13, 1991 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 

1 . Shelley Jurs 

Ornate glass panels will be installed in the front doors 
and transom of the remodeled Police Station. 

2 . Jaap Bongers 

Marble and granite floor pieces have been installed in the 
floor of the station. The 6' square marble piece is made 
of closely-fitting marble and bronze pieces in a radiating 
circular design and will be located under the central 
skylight. The 4' square granite piece is a simple sand- 
blasted design on black granite and will be installed 
immediately inside the front door. 

STATUS: Jaap Bongers has completed installation of the 
floor pieces. 

Shelley Jurs has completed the fabrication work required 
to receive the next progress payment. She will complete 
installation of the glass pieces by September 13, 1991. 

TIMELINE: The Police Department will dedicate the 
remodelled building on Wednesday, September 18, at 11:15 
am. Commissioners are invited to attend the event to 
honor the artists for their contribution to the Cit; 
collection . 

ACTION REQUESTED: 

1. Approval of $5,000 progress payment for Shelley Jurs, 
upon one-half completion of studio work, per contract 
terms . 

2. Approval of final payment to artist Jaap Bongers 
following installation of art work at the Richmond 
District Police Station. 



2LZ- 



PROJECT: Bayview Police Station 

PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macneil (Replacing Jill Manton) 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Bayview/Hunter ' s Point Police 
Station is in the design development stage. The Committee 
has approved program guidelines, and an open call for 
artists has taken place. The Selection Panel will consist 
of the Visual Arts Committee, a guest artist/community 
member, and representatives from the Police Department and 
Bureau of Architecture. 

At this point, there is an opportunity for an artist to 
identify one or several sites for art enrichment: the 
public lobby, main entry and/or the community meeting 
rooms . 

TIMELINE: August, 1991 Approval of guest panelist 

for Selection Panel 
September, 1991 Artist Selection 
February, 1992 Completion of Construction 

Documents 
April, 1992 Begin Construction 
September, 1993 Complete Construction 

ACTION REQUESTED: 

Approval of Gail Reed, Director of the Bayview Opera 
House, as guest panelist for Artist Selection. 



GOOD NEWS 

from the INGLESIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

1345 Ocean Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 94 1 12 - Tel. 587-4472 




4XTA 



August 21 , 1991 



To whom this may concern: 

I am honored to write this letter of support for the proposed 
Mural, "THE CLOUD OF WITNESSES" to be produced at the 
Ingleside Community Center. 

The center, among other things, provides many programs for 
at-risk inner city youths, predominately African-Americans. 
Many of these youths are being reared in s ing 1 e - p a r en t house- 
holds and have low self-esteem. Positive role models, including 
those portrayed in art are a certain self-esteem builder. 

I have reviewed the proposed Mural and am excited by the prospect 
of such an outstanding work gracing the walls of the Ingleside 
Community Center. I urge your approval for funding of this 
project, which I predict will be one of the most outstanding 
works of its kind anywhere. 

Please feel free to call me if I can be of further assistance. 
Thank you for your considering my opinion. 



Sincerely , 



JL^Qv-g-. 



Rev. Roland Gordon 
Pastor 



"We walk by Faith, not by Sight" 



JUS 



8 August 1991 



ATTN: San Francisco Arts Commission 
Visual Arts Committee 

PLUME, by John Ammirati 

Summary 

PLUME is a visual art project located within Candlestick Point State 
Recreation Area, and presented with the support of The California State 
Department of Parks and the sponsorship of The Bayview Opera House. 

In the tradition of ancient land drawings, PLUME is a giant scale figure 
visible in its entirety only from the air. Unlike the ancient ones, this 
drawing done with charcoal and water, is temporary. The image will wash 
away with the rain. 

The drawing will be located on vacant and partially reclaimed industrial 
land that manifests the effects of industry at the expense of nature, but 
which also retains a surviving natural beauty. 

PLUME will involve local students and community residents as visitors and 
participants. The project includes the process, an exhibition of plans, 
photographs, video and constructions. 

Issue and Request 

A small portion (5%) of the drawing would be located on a "paper street" 
adjacent to State Park land. The one block section of Hawes Street between 
Van Dyke and Underwood is completely fenced, the only access being a small 
opening at one end. No neighbors or other persons access the dirt area. 
During the project no public will be allowed access. Although only a small 
portion of the drawing crosses onto the paper street, it is central to the 
concept that the drawing cross the boundary. 

A thorough ecological study has been done by The State Parks Department, and 
the project has been approved and is receiving their enthusiastic support. 
I ask that the Visual Arts Committee give their approval to the project and 
recommend allowing the use of the portion of the paper street area. 

The project runs from 28 September to 27 October 1991. 




John Ammirati, Artist 

1127 Bowdoin Street 

San Francisco, CA. 94134 

415 587 1516/Home 
415 550 0770/Work 
415 822 4432/Studio 



<f*= 



■&*z&!&?*g&g^ 




PLUME project site upper center, state Park l a h „ 
proposes to use a small portion nf! o^ * Pro J ec t 
bordering state Park land? Sse a? ea o„ n ^ <Paper st ^et), 
Bayview District, San Francisco encircled. 



3 

a 
in 
o 

•a 

(D 






jr 



PROJECT: Vallejo Street and Hospital Parking Garages 
Selection Process 

PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macneil 

PROJECT STATUS: A guest Selection Panel met on July 29 to 
identify a short list of artists for each of three 
garages. The Panel recommended 7 artists to the Visual 
Arts Committee, which has selected one of the artists, 
Christopher Sproat , for the Ellis-0 ' Farrell Garage. 

The Visual Arts Committee, with participation from the 
Department of Parking and Traffic, is responsible for the 
selection of finalists for the two remaining garages. 

Project Descriptions for the two remaining garages are 
attached . 

Because of the early stage of project design on both 
sites, the opportunity exists for artists to work directly 
with the architects during design development. In a 
process similar to that developed for the New Sheriff's 
Facility, the artists' concepts can be incorporated into 
working drawings and construction documents. 

ACTION REQUESTED : 

Approval of artist and 

authorization to the Director to enter into contract to 
design art work for the Vallejo Street Parking Garage, for 
an amount not to exceed $50,000. 

Approval of artist and 

authorization to the Director to enter into contract to 
design art work for the Hospital Parking Garage, for an 
amount not to exceed $80,000. 



VALLEJO (NORTH BEACH/CHINATOWN) PARKING GARAGE 

APPLICATION DEADLINE: July 19. 1991 

SITE 

A new municipal parking garage will be constructed on 
Vallejo Street at Churchill Alley, between the North Beach 
and Chinatown neighborhoods. The facility will accommodate 
300 cars and provide up to 10,000 square feet of commercial 
or community space on the street level. 

PROGRAM PARAMETERS AND GOALS: 

Please refer to the Announcement for the general goals of 
the Art Enrichment Program. The artist will have the 
opportunity to cooperate with the architect through 
schematics, design development and working drawings as the 
design phase begins in October of 1991. Possibilities for 
Art Enrichment may include surface treatments, signage and 
design of art work for pedestrian areas and facades. 

SCOPE OF WORK: 



The artist may work with the architects to design surface 
treatments, signage and/or other features of the building. 
A discrete work of art may be designed as well, in which 
case the artist will be responsible for the fabrication, 
transportation and installation of the art. Cost credits 
associated with the artist's designs will be negotiated 
during design development. 

BUDGET : 



The funding available for this project, inclusive of all 
costs, is $50,000. 

TIMELINE 

Notification of results: mid-August 

Beginning of design phase: October, 1991 

Completion of design phase: June, 1992 

Estimated start of construction: January, 1993 

Estimated date of completion: January, 1994 

PROJECT SPONSOR: DEPARTMENT OF PARKING AND TRAFFIC- 
PROJECT ARCHITECT: Tai and Associates 



2 



HOSPITAL PARKING GARAGE 

APPLICATION DEADLINE: July 19. 1991 

SITE 

A municipal parking garage will be constructed near San 
Francisco General Hospital to provide about 1,200 spaces for 
Hospital staff and visitors. 

The garage will occupy the entire city block between 23rd 
and 24th, San Bruno and Utah Streets. San Francisco General 
Hospital and the garage site are located on the edge of the 
Mission District, a predominantly Hispanic community. The 
garage will be immediately next to the hospital grounds and 
extend into a small neighborhood of residences and 
commercial buildings next to the 101 Freeway. 

PROGRAM PARAMETERS AND GOALS: 



Please refer to the Announcement for general goals for the 
site. An artist will be selected to work with the 
architects through all phases of design, including 
schematics, design development and working drawings. 

SCOPE OF WORK 

The artist will work with the architects to design surface 
treatments, signage and/or other features of the building. 
The artist may also design a discrete work of art and will 
be responsible for the fabrication, transportation and 
installation of the work of art. Cost credits associated 
with the artist's designs will be negotiated during design 
development . 

BUDGET 

The funding available for this project, inclusive of all 

costs, is $80,000. 

TIMELINE 

Notification of results: mid-August 

Beginning of design phase: August, 1991 

Completion of design phase: May, 1992 

Estimated start of construction: November, 1992 

Estimated date of completion: April, 1994 

PROJECT SPONSOR: Department of Parking and Traffic 
PROJECT ARCHITECT: Fong and Chan 



City and County 
of San FronchcD 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Sate 240 

San Francisco. C A 94102 

(415)554-9671 



AOT 4 



PROGRAM: 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE AGENDA 



Arts Commission Gallery 



MAYOR 
Art Agno* 



PROJECT: 



Exhibit for October 24 - December 6, 1991 



COMMISSIONERS 
Bo/bora SHor 
President 



/emon Aley 
Stanley Elchelboum 
0m Fowler 
>anle( Genera 
W>e Heary 
lonn Kriken 
tooert F. laRocco 
unalla Meso-Balns. Ph.D. 
Id Y. Okamoto 
>odle Rosekrans 



X OFFICIO MEMBERS 

residents of the 
ne Arts Museum 
brary Commission, 
annlng Commission. 
9CfBahor\ and Park 
ommbslon 



RECTOR 
kire N. tsaocs 



OGRAMS 

ts Festlvoh 

vtc Art Colectlon 

vie Destgn Review 

»ighborhood Arts 

)PS Symphony Concerts 

bile Art Program 

eet Artists Licenses 



DESCRIPTION: Approval of theme, selected artists, proposed works 

Either : Faster, Faster, Kill! Kill! 

o r: Alternate show: suggested artists 

Donna Leigh Schumacher 

Toi Hoang 

Long Nguyen 

Kathleen Jesse 

Nick Ste.inmetz 

Chicako Okada 

Hongbin Zheng 

Sara L<=ith 

Rhoda London 

Juay Gittleson 

-others- 



TIME ESTIMATE: 



PRESENTER: 



VISITORS: 



MOTION: 



Note: The Gallery's Curatorial Committee meets on 8/20, 
Should Faster, Faster not be ready to forward to the 
Visual Arts Committee for approval, an alternate show 
will be proposed. Artists named above, and others 
are being considered. 



te4M 

le-Locol Partnership 

^ 554 -9677 

House 

y 554 -9679 



Commission Gallery 
Grove Street 
554 9682 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

S\Jle240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 



PROGRAM: 



W B 



VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE AGENDA 



Arts Commission Gallery 



MAYOR 
A/1 Agnoi 



COMMISSIONERS 

Borbora SWck 

President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vemon Aley 

Stanley Elchelboum 

KVnFowler 

Daniel Genera 

Ame Heaty 

John Kiikan 

Robert F. LoRocca 

AmoHa Meso-Balnj. Ph 0. 

<rol Y, Okonxjlo 

"■>odle Rosekrons 



EX OFHOXD MEMBERS 

Presidential the 
Hne Arts Museum 
Ubrary Commission. 
Plonntr^g Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



PROJECT: Exhibit: Chain Reaction VII, 
Dates: Dec. 20 - Feb. 15 
Reception: Dec. "19, 5-7pm. 

DESCRIPTION: Reviser) format: 

Either chains of 5 artists started by 

R Advisory Board members and 2 staff, 

or: 

Chains initiated by Board + Guests 
TIME ESTIMATE: Guests may include SF nuseum directors, 

writers, people nominated for Advisory Board. 



PRESENTER: 
VISITORS: 



Format will be determined at the 8/20 meeting 
of the Gallery's Advisory Board. 

Meissner to present at the VAC meeting. 

Time: 5-10 minutes. 



MOTION: Approval of Chain Reaction with either of 
the above formats , 



DIRECTOR 
Claire N, Isaacs 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festtvob 
CMcArtColecHon 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerti 
Public A/1 Program 
Street Amirs Ucenses 



Suite 4W 

Sate-Locol Partnership 

415- 654 -9677 

ArrHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554 9682 

L 



PROJECT: San Andreas Water Treatment Plant Expansion #1 

PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macneil 

BUDGET: $20,000 (10% Admin) ($18,000 for art work) 

BEGINNING DATE: 1988 

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE: September, 1991 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: A selection of historic Water 
Department photographs was made by the curator for 
installation in Water Department Offices throughout the 
City. $4,000 remains in this budget which may be used to 
augment the San Andreas II budget. 

STATUS: Framing is complete. Photographs will be 
installed at the Water Department offices at 1990 Newcomb 
on September 9, 1991. 

Examples of the framed photographs can be seen during the 
Visual Arts Committee meeting. 



ZZ6 



STAFF REPORT 
DATE: AUGUST 21, 1991 
FROM: SUSAN PONTIOUS 
RE: LOTHAR BAUMGARTEN PROPOSAL AND FEES 



Background: 

At the Visual Arts Committee June 26th meeting, Jill Manton 
and I presented our staff report relative to their June 12th 
meeting with Lothar (attached). The Committee declined to 
increase his fee, but was ameniable to entertaining one or 
two proposals from him instead of 5. This decision was 
communicated to Lothar in my letter of July 1 . 

Shortly after this, Lothar met with Jennifer Sage in New 
York, and decided that he would do only one project, a 
sentence (Type is the Voice of the Printed Page) painted on 
the suspended ceiling created by the Reading Room. He also 
requested another $10,000 in travel and per diem. 

This proposal and the request for additional funds was 
presented to the Visual Arts Committee on July 31st. It was 
initially approved, but subsequently withdrawn from the full 
Arts Commission consent calendar due to the disappointment 
expressed by both Commissioners and the architects regarding 
this proposal . 

August 20th Meeting with Architects: I met with the all 
three architects (Cathy Simon, Jim Freed and Jennifer Sage) 
to discuss the issue. They all felt that the painted 
sentence was the least interesting of all his ideas. 
Jennifer reported that Lothar was very disheartened over the 
project and felt that the root of it was his disagreement 
with the Arts Commission over fees. 

We discussed other project options that they would prefer. 
Their recommendations were as follows: 

1. A graphic representation of the proportions of the page 
engraved on a 15' x 30' dark granite rectangle on the 
exterior of the Grove St. facade, similar to the one 
Lothar had originally proposed for the glass in the 
entry there. 

If Lothar agreed to do this project, he would have to 
redesign (and would certainly demand another design 
fee), but i mp 1 enientat i on would be relatively 
inexpensive . 

2. One of the designs he In. I proposed for the floor. 



Lothar had, at his recent meeting with Jennifer, 
decided against the floor because he was afraid he 
would not be able (or willing) to spend the time 
necessary in order to have the control he demands over 
his projects. 

Options : 

The Committee has the following options: 

1. Approve Lothar 's proposal with additional travel money 

2. Reject the proposal, and request another project in 
lieu of that one as per the architect's recommendation 

3. If the Committee chooses #2, it will have to decide 
whether or not it is willing to pay additional design 
fees. (My estimate is between $15,000 - $20,000). 

Committee Action: 

Staff needs clear Committee direction on this matter. I 
would suggest that at this time, this should be in the form 
of a directive, rather than a formal resolution for the full 
Commission . 



DATE: 6/19/91 

TO: Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Susan Pontious 



RE: 



Main Library Project Update: 
Aycock re-design. 



Baungarten Fees; 



Baumgarten Fees: The Arts Commission has authorized a 
fee of $85,000 for Lothar Baumgarten for Design 
Development and implementation of his concepts for the 
main library. (This would make his total fees for all 
phases of the project $100,000). The artist had 
originally requested $200,000. At the direction of the 
Commission, staff wrote to the artist with the 
Commission's offer and explained the reasons why we 
could not offer what he had requested. We received no 
reply to this letter. 

On June 12th, Jill Manton and I met with the artist here 
in San Francisco and discussed his fees at length. The 
artist has not accepted the Commission's offer and made 
the following points: 

1. His standard fees are between $150,000 - $250,000. 
His projects have all been for other non-profit 
institutions like museums. 

2. For the fee he proposes, he is offering 5 different 
projects that carry the same theme throughout the 
library. 

3. His work is very precise, involving exacting 
mathematical calculations. The architects' various 
redesigns have already forced him to redo his work 
several times. 

4. He is intimately involved in all phases of 
implementation, overseeing all details. If 
necessary, he fabricates himself to insure that the 
work is up to his standards. 

Staff agreed to make the Committee aware of these facts, 
and to ask the Committee if they wanted to reconsider 
the fee range for this artist. We also asked Lothar to 
consider whether or not he would consider doing perhaps 
only one or two of his proposed projects if the 
Commission would not increase his fees. 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



J U I y 



1991 



Lothar Baumgarten 
c/o Marian Goodman 
Marian Goodman Gallery 
21 W. 57th St. 
New York, NY 10019 



Dear Lothar; 



MAYOR 
Art Agrto* 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara SkJar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Aley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Amgjla Mesa&ilrn. Ph.D. 
^ <Dkamoto 
t. — Rosekrans 



Jill Manton and 1 enjoyed meeting with you last month 
and having the opportunity to discuss the project with 
you in person. 

As per our discussion, Jill and I once again raised the 
question of your tee with the Visual Arts Committee, and 
stressed the points you made at our meeting justifying 
your fee request. 

However, the Committee declined to change its position 
regarding their offer, which remains at $85,000 
inclusive for the Design Development and Implementation 
Phases of the project. (Added to the $22,500 you have 
already been paid, this would bring your total fee for 
the project to $97,500) 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents o( the 

Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



We informed the Committee that you were unwilling to 
continue with all 5 proposed projects for this fee, but 
would possibly consider doing just one or two. The 
Committee was amenable to the idea of working with just 
one or two of your proposals, and hoped that you would 
agree to this compromise. 



ACTING DIRECTOR 
Margie O'Drlscoll 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMcArtColectton 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

Slate-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
4.1^-554-9682 



Have you given this opt ion any more thought'.' We are 
still very hopeful that we can all come to some 
agreement on this matter. 

As the architect's deadlines for completing design 
development drawings are rapidly approaching, would you 
please notify us no later than Ju 1 y 1 at. h of your 
decision on this matter'.' The architects will need to 
know immediately which of your projects w i 1 I be 
incorporated in building. 

Sincere! 



S l nee re Iv. 
Susan I 'U t tons 



(!) 



^ta 




Date: August 20, 1991 

To: Finalists for the Gateway Project 

Sdte24Q°" AvenUe Mark DiSuvero 

Son Francisco. C A 94102 Josh Weiiisteiu - Site, Inc. 

FAX#M1*3868 Andrew Ginzel and Kristin Jones 

From: Jill Manton, Director, Public Art Program 

Re: Date for Presentation 

MAYOR 
ArtAanos 

This will confirm that Monday, September 30, 1991 has been 
scheduled as the date on which you will present your 
proposals for the South Gateway Project to the Selection 
and Advisory Panels. The presentations will take place 
NancyBoas from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM at 25 Van Ness Avenue, in Suite 
vice President 70, which is located on the basement level. Approximately 

VemonAiey 45 minutes has been scheduled for each presentation. 

Stanley Elchelbaum 
Kim Fowler 

DanieiGenera The Selection Panel for this project includes: 

ArmeHeoTy 
John Krlken 

Robert F. LaRocca Commissioner Robert LaKocca - landscape architect and 

_ Amelia Mesa-Bains, Ph.D. , « , ., .. ,„ . ,. , ., . , A . „ 

•' i\ Y. Otamoto member of both the Civic Design and Visual Arts Committee 
_— -'"odie Rosekraru of the Arts Commission 

Regina Almaguer - Director of Public Art Program - City of 

Oakland 

Leah Levy - Independent curator and former director of 

Capp Street Project and the Leah Levy Gal Lerj 
library Commission. Ned Kahn - Artist 

R^£c^7 Mildred Howard - Artist 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara SkJar 
President 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents o( the 
Fine Arts Museum 



Commission 



The role of the Selection Panel is to recommend one artist 
ACTING DIRECTOR or team who will be subject to the review ami approval of 

Morale ODrlscoil , ne visual Arts Committee ami the full Arts Commission. 

A non-voting Advisory Panel has also been established for 
A ^°^ A ^ this project. The members of this panel include 

CMc Art Coiection representatives from the 7 lily departments involved with 

Ne^hbofhoo^ArT the Wale, front Transportation Projects. Many of these 

POPS Symphony Concerts people were participants in the Ol icnlat i .mi that took 
Public Art Program i i . l UMe 

Street Artists licenses place last. .Mine. 



In add i I i on , because Pane] meetings are considered Lo be 

State local Partnership open meetings, members ol 1 he pllb] I. ill. i > also In' present , 
AtHouse as we 'l as Aits Commissioners who will eventually have to 

4)5554%79 decide whether I <> accept the recommendal Lou of the 

Selection Pain- I . 
Arts Commission Gallery 

4^5544682 8et Please remember lo Bend oi bring an invoice for your 
"* ; proposal. The total of tin- invoice should include the 

»■- $2,500 you will In. pa i .1 for '."in proposal along w i t h any 

other documented brave] expenses i ncurred i up to a max imum 
of $1,250. Please fa I egoi i ,'.e sour persona] Lrave] and 
hotel expenses as pail ol your proposal f ee , because the 



S. . lo 430 



City will not reimburse for travel. What we have to do, in 
effect, is "hide" it as part of your proposal honorarium. 
If you have spent the full $1,250 travel allowance, your 
invoice would reflect a $3750 proposal fee. I hope this is 
not confusing. 

Please let me know if I might assist you with hotel or 
travel arrangements or if I can provide you with any 
further information or material needed for your proposal. 

I am looking forward to seeing all of you and 1 wish you 
the best of luck in developing your proposal for this 
project . 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



-JLb 



MINUTES FOR AIRPORT ART ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
JULY 25, 1991 

Present: Bill Coblentz 
Anne Healy 
Bob LaRocca 
Stanley Mattison 
Susan Pontious 
Jason Yuen 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



I. Approval of June 4 Minutes 

Bill Coblentz moved approval of the June 4 minutes. 
Stan Mattison seconded. It was so moved. 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 



Vernon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Genny Llm 

Arjplia Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
k '-.Okamoto 
. .»."; Rosek/ans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



II. Review of applicants for Artist Master Plan 
position : 

A . Human Rights Commission Requirements : 

It was agreed that Susan Pontious should check 
with the City Attorney regarding the 
applicability of new HRC legislation on artist 
selection for this project. 

B. Final ists : 

The Committee reviewed a list of semi finalists 
presented by Susan Pontious and developed a 
tentative short list to interview in November. 
The following artists were selected for 
interview : 

Roger Berry 

Bob Nugent 

Mark Pally 

Buster Simpson 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Wlnshlp 



'ROGRAMS 

<rts Festivals 

:Mc Art Collection 

:ivlc Design Review 

leighborhood Arts 

OPS Symphony Concerts 

ubllc Art Program 

rreet Artists Licenses 



It was agreed that staff would call the past 
clients of these artists for recommendations. 

For August 22nd Meeting: 

It was agreed that for the next meeting the 

staff would present the following: 

1. An articulated scope-of-work , detailing 

the expected commitments and 

responsibil ities. 



Jte 430 

late-Local Partnership 

15-554-9677 

rtHouse 

15-554-9679 



\rts Commission Gallery 
("Grove Street 
"•» *1 9682 



2. 



Report from City Attorney re- 
applicability of new HRC legislation, 



3. Budget 

4. Other candidates if necessary 

III. Freda Koblick Sculpture 

The Committee reviewed the staff report and 
discussed issues relating to the re- ins tal 1 at ion of 
Freda Koblick Bculpture "Niglit Sky". It was agreed 



that if the work were to be re-installed there 
would need to be an ongoing maintenance plan. It 
was also suggested that the staff should explore 
with the artist whether or not the sculpture could 
be re-cabled to reduce sway. 



Bill Coblentz moved re-installation of "Night Sky". 
Anne Healy seconded. Jason Yuen modified the 
motion to include requiring the Arts Commission to 
present a maintenance plan for the Koblick and 
other sculptures at the airport. It was so moved. 



Cor^c^ s/zer/?/ 



STAFF REPORT 
DATE: July 22, 1991 

TO: Airport Art Steering Committee 
Debra Lehane 

FROM: Susan Pontious 

RE: Freda Koblick sculpture "Night Sky". 

Background : 

The sculpture, one of the first artworks to be 
commissioned for the North Terminal, was installed in 
1981 and cost $108,105. The work was designed 
specifically for the United Hub site, selected by the 
Joint Committee, and approved by both the Airport and 
the Arts Commission. 

During the course of the commission, the artist made a 
successful claim against the City over a fee dispute. 

As an artist, Ms. Koblick gained recognition for her 
pioneering work with cast acrylics. Purportedly, "Night 
Sky" is the world's largest polymethyl methacrylate 
casting . 

During its tenure in the North Terminal Rotunda, 
maintenance of the sculpture became an issue as dust and 
grime marred the work's intended luminosity. 

Removal Following 1898 Earthquake: 

While not damaged during the 1989 earthquake, the work 
was removed to allow for structural repairs in the 
ceiling. At the time the work was removed, Don 
Garibaldi, City Attorney for the Airport, assured Claire 
Isaacs, former Director of the Arts Commission, that the 
work would be re-installed as soon as the North Terminal 
was ready. 

Storage Costs: 

Although ready for re- i nstal lat ion in August, 1990, the 

sculpture remains in storage at a cost of $158.40 a 

month . 

Since August, 1990, storage of the work has cost $1,900. 



ai rport/kobl ick Page - 1 



Re-instal latiori Issues Raised by Airport: 

It is our understanding that Lou Turpen, Director of the 
Airport, has requested that the sculpture not be re- 
installed. The primary issue seems to be that the 
sculpture swung severely during the earthquake, and 
badly frightened people. 

Response from the Artist: The artist has been very 
concerned about the re- ins tal lat ion of this sculpture as 
it represents her most important commission. She feels 
that the work is also significant because it represents 
the first major commission by a woman at the airport. 

She has told Debra Lehane that she feels that her work 
is being "discriminated against", and has once again 
threatened legal action. 

Collection Manager's Recommendations: 

The recommendation of the Arts Commission's Collections 
Manager has been to re-install the artwork for the 
following reasons: 

1. Despite appearances during the earthquake, the work 
is, in fact, not a safety hazard. The structural 
engineering for the piece has been recently 
reviewed and found to be more than adequate to 
ensure safety. 

2. Maintenance issues have been addressed. After 
being cleaned and polished, the sculpture will be 
treated with an anti-static material to control the 
accumulation of dust. 

3. The work has been in place for a minimal amount of 
t ime ( 1 years ) . 

4. fiecause of its size, and because the work was 
designed specifically for that site, deaccessioning 
or relocating the work is not practical. This 
means that in all likelihood, the Arts Commission 
and/or the Airport would continue to accrue storage 
c osts at the rate of $1,91)0 a year if the work is 
lid I. re - i ns tal 1 ed . 

5 . Poss i bl e legal action on the part of the artist 
aga i n r t t ho Ci ty . * 



airport /kohl LcU Page 



*No t e : 



In my reading of both the Artist's contract 



and the provisions of the Calif. Art Preservation act, I 
find no grounds for such a suit. While the City is 
compelled to protect the artwork, we are under no 
obligation to display it. My reading should, of course, 
be confirmed by the City Attorney. 



Pertinent Documents Referenced: 



1/7/91 letter; D. 
8/15/90 letter; D 
8/1/90 letter; F. 
11/3/89 letter; C 
4/15/87 letter; D 
5/1/85 letter; M 



Lehane to J . Yuen 

Lehane to D. Buey 
Koblick to I). Lehane 
Isaacs to D. Buey 
Lehane to F. Koblick 
Caveness to L. Turpen 
5/13/85 letters; L. Turpen to C. Isaacs and M. Caveness 
3/29/82 Interrogatories; F. Koblick vs. City and County 
of San Francisco 

Spring/Summer 1982 "Plastics Today; A Business Magazine 
for the Plastics Industry" 

5/29/81 "Some Exalted Things With Light", San Francisco 
Chronicle, review by Allan Temko . 



a i i pi. i- 1 / kob I Lck 



l.u;.' 




SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

155 Grove Street, San Francisco. California 94102 (415) 554-9682 

For Immediate Release: 
August 11, 1991 
Contact: Anne Meissner 
Kathleen Kolba 
(415) 554-9682 

Solo Exhibits 

Robert Catalusci 

Rudjen Roldan 

Exhibition: August 30 - October 11, 1991 

Reception: Thursday, August 29, 5:00-7:00PM 

Concurrent solo exhibits by Robert Catalusci and Rudjen Roldan will open 
Thursday evening, August 29, 1991 at the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery and 
will run through October 11, 1991. The artists, selected by Gallery staff Anne Meissner 
and Kathleen Kolba, with the assistance of the Gallery's Curatorial Committee share 
an interest in art that addresses the subject of history. Whereas Roldan's works 
reconstruct a personal history, Catalusci's installation questions history — its textbook 
accounts, assumptions as well as deletions. 
New works by these San Francisco artists include: 

Robert Catalusci. Same As It Always Was is a set like environment consisting 
of giant conestoga wagon wheels, a billboard/drive-in movie screen on which slides 
of landscapes and the environment will be projected, and a floor treatment of sand 
and rocks suggesting a desert wash except the rocks are wrapped with history texts. 
Same As It Always Was re-examines 'how the West was won' as recorded in 
social/political texts and as portrayed in myths and commonly held assumptions. 
Catalusci exaggerates the wagon wheel to emphasize that the land and Native 
American cultures were destroyed as newcomers progressed West. His title suggests 
that the process continues; moreover, it receives justification in texts, values and 
cowboy myths. Catalusci's most recent work, the Lighthouse, erected on the site of an 
earthquake destroyed building in Santa Cruz (currently on view), provides a spiritual 
haven for the people and a beacon of hope for the area's redevelopment. Same As It 
Always Was poses no answers or direction; only questions to be pondered. 

Catalusci holds a B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute where he received 
the Chauncey McKeever Award and the Golden Seal Award for sculpture. This year 
he has an individual artist grant from The Clinton Walker Foundation 



Rudjen Roldan. Seven Angels. Willow. Nomad. Wish List. Shovel. Roses. Utters. 
Dough. Roldan investigates her Filipino childhood experiences, cultural and religious 
beliefs in the process of fabricating new works. Her enigmatic armatures bound with 
gauze, burlap, and plaster and covered with wax suggest fossilized body organs, clumps of 
earth, or childlike images. "The pieces are mostly autobiographical and sometimes general 
and philosophical meditations," she wrote. "They tell stories.. .(and) try to order and make 
sense of experience." They often embody ideas that "insist on being contradictory and 
paradoxical," ideas such as a fall from grace/redemption, death/resurrection, 
displacement/belonging, nostalgia and loss/containments and memento mori. With 
Nomad, for example, thirty-six clumps of earth are suspended in a vine like cascade. Each 
clump is separate, displaced from the ground, yet tied to a larger whole. Seven Angels is 
comprised of seven black boxes containing materials that look like fossilized body parts. 
As a child Roldan was taught that each day an angel watched over her and that sin 
darkened the heart. With Seven Angels Roldan recognizes the death of such authority 
and guilt in her life; yet the piece is suffused with a longing for the companionship of 
angels and a nostalgia for innocence. Shovel is both a requiem for an adult's loss of 
childhood and a metaphor for an investigation of identity - which she likens to a process 
of digging, burying and renewing. 

Roldan holds a M.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute and a B.S. in Management 
Economics from Ateneo de Manila University, Manila, Philippines. She received a 
Wava McCoullough Award of Excellence in Art and a Scholarship for Undergraduate 
Studies at the San Francisco Art Institute from Santa Moncia College. 



####### 
Photographs available on request 

####### 

Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Friday, llam-5pm; 

Thursday, 11am-8pm; 

Saturday, 12-5pm. 

Closed, August 31 
Free admission. Handicap accessible. 

The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery is a not-for-profit exhibition space under the auspice of the San 
Francisco Arts Commission, City and County of San Francisco. It is also funded in part by the California 
Arts Council, the LEF Foundation and other business and private contributions. The Gallery's Exploration: 
City Site program receives sponsorship from Intersection for the Arts. The Gallery is a member of the 
National Association of Artists' Organizations (NAAO), Bay Area Consortium for Visual Arts (BACVA), 
Non-Profit Gallery Association (NPGA) and the San Francisco Convention and Visitors Bureau. 




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25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francfeico. CA 94102 The Visual Arts Committee Meeting scheduled for Wednesday. 

fax# 5 621 9 3868 Sept. 25th has been cancelled due to lack of a quorum. 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 



Vernon Alley 

Stanley Elchelbaum 

Daniel Genera 

Anne Heary 

John Kriken 

Robert F. LaRocca 

Genny Lim 
k ~J\ja Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
* Okamoto 

Dodie Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Winship 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



ArKCommlsslon Gallery 
I'mr ove Street 




25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX#621-3B68 3 • 00 I 



AGENDA 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25, 1991 

3 P.M. 

25 VAN NESS, SUITE 70 

Approval of August 28, 1991 Minutes 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Barbara Sklar 
President 



Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Genny Lim 

Amalia Mesa-Bains, Ph.D. 
R-^— Okamoto 
fc ^Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ot the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Winshlp 



3:05 II. Consent Calendar 

A. Authorization to make a final payment of 
$9,375 to Alan Fleming for Kezar Stadium 
Gates. \ / / 

i ¥/ 

B. Authorization to make a final payment of 
$5,000 to Sheia&y^Jijrs for architectural 
glass at Richmiona Police Station. 

tvc/ / 

C. Approval to,|ncrease the contract with 
Stanley Saitowit.z , Barbara Solomon and Vito 
Acconci by S 1 5 , 000 upon submission of working 
drawings For /South Embarcadero, thereby 
bringing the total fee for preliminary 
design, design development and working 
drawings X/o $60,000. 

D. Authorisation to make a final payment of 
$3,500 /to Delaney and Cochran. 

E. Authorization to extend Carl Cheng's design 
contract for the New Sheriff's Facility 
through Dec. 31 , 199] 

7 

/ 

3:10 III. Bayview Police Station 

Tonia/Mcnei 1 
Artist Selection 



PROGRAMS 

Arts Festivals 

Civic Art Collection 

Civic Design Review 

Neighborhood Arts 

POPS Symphony Concerts 3.50 V 

Public Art Program 

Street Artists Licenses 



3:40 IV. Gallery 

Anne Meissner 

Artist selection format for Chain Head ion exhibit 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 

4Wi54-9682 



'irestation #37 
/Susan Pontious; Bruce Flynn, Bureau of 
/ Architecture 
/ Approval of Art Enrichment Art Program Con 



cept 



4:00 VI. Library 

Susan Pout ions 

Approval of licsun Development Contract for Alice 

Aycock . 



4:10 VII. Mental Health Facility 
Susan Pontious 

Screening of 2-Dimensional Work for possible 
purchase 

4:25 VIII. Moscone/Howard St. 
Jill Manton 

Discussion of procedures/options; new date for 
artists' presentation 

4:35 IX. Market St. 
Jill Manton 

1. Request for an additional payment of $600 to 
Earth Drama Lab for portable toilets required 
by Recreation and Park Dept. for Eco Rap 
concert . 

2. Art in Transit 

Report on next project application cycle 

4:45 X. Embarcadero Plaza Planning Project 
Jill Manton 
Report on RFQ /Selection Process 



4 :50 XI 



Information 

A. Airport Art Steering Committee Minutes 



Reminder of Gateway Artist Presentation: 
Sept. 30, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Calif. College of Arts and Crafts sponsored 
event: "Mapping the Terrain: The New Public 
Art" at the Museum of Modern Art, Nov. 14th. 

Description of event, reception and staff 
role . 



5:00 Ajournment 




25 Von Ness Avenue 

Sure 240 

Son Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX# 621-3868 



2:00 I 



AGENDA 
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
MONDAY, OCT. 7, 1991 

2 P.M. 
25 VAN NESS, SUITE 70 

Approval of August 28, 1991 Minutes 



2:05 II 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Borboro Sklor 
President 

Nancy Boos 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 

Stanley Elchelbaum 

Daniel Genera 

Anne Healy 

John Kriken 

Robert F LaRocca 

Genny Lim 
["Valla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
I* V. Okamoto 
f.de Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Winship 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
& Grove Street 2:10 111. 

<554-9682 



Consent Calendar 

A. Authorization to make a final payment of 
$9,375 to Alan Fleming for Kezar Stadium 
Gates . 

Project complete 

B. Authorization to make a final payment of 
$5,000 to Shelley Jurs for architectural 
glass at Richmond Police Station. 
Project complete 

C. Authorization to make a payment of $3,500 to 
Delaney and Cochran for completion of Master 
Plan. 

F. Authorization to extend Carl Cheng's design 
contract for the New Sheriff's Facility 
through Dec. 31 , 1991 

G. Authorization for Director to enter into a 
Design Development Contract with Alice Aycock 
for $15,000 for further development of her 
proposal for the Main Library. 

Approval of contract for previously approved 
design. Budget includes $2,500 for Artist 
Fees and the balance for engineering , 
technical support and travel. 

H. Approval of final payment to Jim Bernstein 
for contract numbers 2890010 & 2870010 
(completion of conservation work at Airport). 

I. Request for an additional payment of $600 to 
Earth Drama Lab for portable toilets required 
by Recreation and Park Dept for Eco Rap 
concert (making Art's Commission's final 
payment to Earth Drama Lab a total of 
$2,300) . 

Gallery 



.; 



Anne Meissner 

Proposed artist selection format for Chain 
Reaction exhibit: gallery advisors and Arts 
Commissioners will be asked to invite one living 
artist, working in any artistic discipline, to 
participate and begin the "chain". 

2:15 IV. Moscone/Howard St. 

Joanne Chow Winship 

Discussion of procedures/options; new date for 

artists' presentation 

2:40 V. Market St. 
Jill Manton 

1. Request to modify contract with Delaney and 
Cochran to provide additional services for 
the distribution of the Market Stree Arts 
Master Plan and the completion and 
coordination of a series of previously 
approved "seeding" events. Contract would be 
extended through Jan 30, 1992 and increased 
by $7,500. 

2. Art in Transit 

Approval of payment of $5,000 to Bill Fontana 
to implement sound sculpture for Castro 
Theatre Organ/Muni Project. 

Project and artist approved previously; final 
approval waiting for Artist ' s fee proposal . 

2:45 VI. Gateway Project 

Approval of Selection Panel recommendation for 
Gateway commission. 

2:55 VII. Promenade Project 

Request direction from Committee as to whether or 
not one of the Promenade artists should make a 
design presentation to Civic Design and Visual 
Arts . 

VIII. Information 

A. Muni-Metro Turnaround Selection Panel is 
scheduled to meet Oct. 16th, at 10 a.m. 

B. The Commission will soon be asked to comment 
upon the possible removal of the Vaillancourt 
Fountain from Justin Herman Plaza as part of 
the development of the new Embarcadero Plaza. 



Legal issues relevant to the Art Preservation 
Act will have to be researched. 



3:00 Ajournment 




'Jets Avenue 
Sale 240 

San Francisco. CA 94)02 
(415)554-967) 
FAX #621-3868 



MINUTES 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

OCTOBER 7, 1991 

The meeting was called to order at 2:10 p.m. 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



Commissioners Present 
Anne Healy, Chair 
Nancy Boas 
Bob LaRocca 



COMMISSIONERS 

Borbora SWch 
President 

Nancy Boos 
Vice President 

Vemon AAey 
Stanley Elchelboum 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Heaty 
John Kriken 
Robert F LaRocca 
Genny um 

Blla Mesa-Bains. Ph D. 

smoto 

sekrans 



I I - 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Wlnshlp 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMC Art Collection 
CMc Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Ucenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
4 1 r »y-v682 



Staff Present: 

Joanne Chow Winship, Director 

Tonia Macneil 

Susan Pontious 

I. Minutes for August 28, 1991 

Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve the Committee 
minutes of August 28, 1991. Commissioner Boas seconded. 
It was so moved. 

II. Consent Calendar 

The following items were on the consent calendar: 

A. Authorization to make a final payment of $9,375 
to Alan Fleming for Kezar Stadium Gates. 

B. Authorization to make a final payment of $5,000 
to Shelley Jurs for architectural glass at Richmond Police 
Station . 

C. Authorization to make a payment of $3,500 to 
Delaney and Cochran for completion of Master Plan. 

D. Authorization to extend Carl Cheng's design 
contract for the New Sheriff's Facility through Dec. 31, 
1991. 

E. Authorization for Director to enter into a 
Design Development Contract with Alice Aycock for $15,000 
for further development of her proposal for the Main 
Library. 

F. Approval of final payment to Jim Bernstein for 
contract numbers #2890010 & #2870010 (completion of 
conservation work at Airport). 

G. Request for an additional payment of $600 to 
Earth Drama Lab for Portable toilets required by 
Recreation and Park Dept for Eco Rap concert (making Art's 
Commission's final payment to Earth Drama Lab a total of 
$2,300). 



VAC-MIN1007.91 



Page 



Commissioner Healy moved approval of the consent calendar. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

III. Arts Commission Gallery 

Susan Pontious outlined Gallery Director Anne Meissner's 
proposal for the selection format for the annual Chain 
Reaction exhibit: gallery advisors and Arts Commissioners 
will be asked to invite one living artist, working in any 
artistic discipline, to participate and begin the "chain". 

Discussion followed concerning the feasibility of the 
proposal in terms of the Commission's objectivity and the 
scale of the exhibit. The Committee acknowledged that the 
concept of a cross-disciplinary exhibition was a good one, 
and suggested that the Gallery Director consider all or 
part of three options: 

In addition to the current advisory panel, 

1 . the Selection Panel could be composed of past Gallery 

advisors 

2. the Director might select panelists from leaders in 

other disciplines 

3. Selected artists could be directed to choose artists 

from other disciplines for their chain. 

IV. Art Enrichment: Moscone Center/Howard Street 

Joanne Chow Winship, Director of Cultural Affairs, 
explained that the Commission cannot enter into a design 
and fabrication contract with the artists until their 
proposal has successfully completed the City's approval 
process. The Commission can, however, enter into a 
feasibility study contract with the artists in order to 
address the Commission's questions in regard to language, 
budget and technical feasibility and maintenance. The 
artists will be invited to address those issues at a 
meeting of the Visual Arts Committee. The public will be 
encouraged to attend. 

A fee of $2,500.00 for study necessary to respond to the 
Commission's concerns and for travel to the meeting was 
proposed. However Commissioners Healy and LaRocca felt 
that $3,000.00 was more in keeping with professional 
standards. Commissioner Healy moved to approve a 
feasibility study contract for the Howard Street team in 
the amount of $3,000.00. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. 
Commissioner Boas stated that she preferred the fee of 
$2,500.00. Commissioners Healy and LaRocca voted to 



VAC-MIN1007.91 Page - 2 



approve the motion. Commissioner Boas voted against the 
motion. The motion passed. 

V. Art Enrichment: Market Street Projects 

1. Market Street Art Master Plan. 

Request to modify contract with Delaney and Cochran to 
provide additional services for the distribution of the 
Market Street Arts Master Plan and the completion and 
coordination of a series of previously approved "seeding" 
events. Contract would be extended through January 30, 
1992 and increased by $7,500. 

Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve the request and 
Commissioner Healy seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

2. Art in Transit "Seeding" Project. 

Request for approval of payment of $5,000 to Bill Fontana 
to implement sound sculpture for Castro Theatre Organ/Muni 
Project . 

Susan Pontious reminded that Committee that they had 
previously approved the project and the artist, and are 
now being asked to approve the artist's proposed fee. 
Commissioner Healy moved to approve the payment of a fee 
of $5,000 to Bill Fontana. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. 
It was so moved. 

VI. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero Gateway Project 
Commissioner LaRocca reported on the results of the 
selection process for the Embarcadero Gateway Project. 
The Selection Panel has unanimously selected the artist 
Mark di Suvero to create a work of art for the site. 
Susan Pontious added that the panel's choice has the full 
support of the Port, the Community Advisory Committee and 
the Advisory Committee. The art work will be located 
primarily on park property generously provided by the 
Redevelopment Agency. 

The artist has proposed a kinetic piece, which would move 
in the wind or be manipulated by visitors. He works from 
conceptual drawings and does not create a model before 
beginning to work directly with materials. 

A discussion ensued as to the proper approval process for 
the art in light of the artist's process. Commissioner 
Healy stated that she can not approve something she hasn't 
seen, and asked that staff develop an approval and fee 
schedule which would allow the Commission to view and 



VAC-MIN1007.91 



Page 



approve the art in progress. It was agreed that the 
proposal must go through the full approval process of both 
the Port and the Arts Commission. 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the selection of 
artist Mark di Suvero to create a work of art for the 
Embarcadero Gateway. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The 
ayes were unanimous. 

VII. Arts Enrichment: Embarcadero Promenade Project 
At the request of Susan Pontious, the Committee agreed 
that the Visual Arts Committee and the Civic Design 
Committee should hold a joint meeting to hear the 
presentation of the Promenade artists of their latest 
design proposal. The members of the Civic Design 
Committee will be invited to join the Visual Arts 
Committee at a future meeting. 

VIII. Information 

A. The Muni-Metro Turnaround Selection Panel is 
scheduled to meet on October 16, at 10 a.m. 

B. The Commission will soon be asked to comment 
upon the possible removal of the Vail lancourt Fountain 
from Justin Herman Plaza as part of the development of the 
new Embarcadero Plaza. Legal issues relative to the Art 
Preservation Act will have to be researched. 

C. The Cultural Affairs Director has met with the 
Director of the Human Rights Commission to discuss issues 
related to the selection of artists. Staff is now working 
to develop guidelines for a Public Art selection process 
which conforms to the spirit of the HRC ordinances. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS: 

1. Ordered: Approval of minutes of August 28, 1991 
Visual Arts Committee Meeting. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Authorization to make a final payment 
of $9,375 to Alan Fleming for Kezar Stadium Gates. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN1007.91 Page 



Ordered: Authorization to make a final payment 
of $5,000 to Shelley Jurs for architectural glass at 
Richmond Police Station. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: Authorization to make a payment of 
$3,500 to Delaney and Cochran for completion of Master 
Plan. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Authorization to extend Carl Cheng's 
design contract for the New Sheriff's Facility through 
Dec. 31, 1991. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: Authorization for Director to enter 
into a Design Development Contract with Alice Aycock for 
$15,000 for further development of her proposal for the 
Main Library. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: Approval of final payment to Jim 
Bernstein for contract numbers #2890010 & #2870010 
(completion of conservation work at Airport). 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

8. Ordered: Approval of an additional payment of 
$600 to Earth Drama Lab for Portable toilets required by 
Recreation and Park Dept for Eco Rap concert (making Art's 
Commission's final payment to Earth Drama Lab a total of 
$2,300) . 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

9. Ordered: Approval of a feasibility study 
contract for Mart inez/Petropoulos/White for the 
Moscone/Howard Street Project for an amount not to exceed 
$3,000.00 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Aye: LaRocca, Healy 
Nay : Boas 



VAC-MIN1007.91 



Page - 5 



10. Ordered: Authorization to modify contract with 
Delaney and Cochran for the Market Street Arts Master 
Plan, extending the contract through January 30, 1992 and 
increasing it by $7,500.00. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

11. Ordered: Authorization to pay $5,000 fee to 
Bill Fontana to implement sound sculpture for the Castro 
Theatre Organ/Muni Project. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

12. Ordered: Approval of the selection of artist 
Mark di Suvero to create a work of art for the Embarcadero 
Gateway . 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



Submitted : 



y CUJL0U 




Tonia Macnei] 
Curator, Public Art Program 



VAC-MIN1007.91 



Page - 6 




r J/5&S 



25 Van Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

Son Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



AGENDA 

JOINT MEETING, VISUAL ARTS AND CIVIC DESING COMMITTEES 

2:30 P.M. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 1991 

REGULAR MEETING OF VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

3:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 1991 

25 VAN NESS, SUITE 70 



2:30 I 



MAYOR 








Art Agnos 








COMMISSIONERS 


3 


:00 


I. 


Barbara Sklar 
Prendent 


3: 


:05 


II. 


Nancy Boas 
Vice President 








Vernon Alley 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Daniel Genera 


3 


;30 


Ill 


Anne Heaty 
John Knken 








Robert F. LaRocca 








Genny Um 

Amalia Mesa-Bains. Ph D 








kUf. Okamoto 








i '-3 Rosekrans 









EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents ol the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Ubrary Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Winship 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



3:30 IV. 



3:40 V. 



4:10 VI, 



JOINT MEETING AGENDA 
Promenade design Presentation 
Jill Manton 

REGULAR VISUAL ARTS 

Approval of Oct. 7, 1991 minutes 

Policy: Discussion of Arts Commission 
Artist Selection Procedures 

Joanne Chow Winship and staff 

Consent Calendar 

Approval of request to extend Shelley 
Jurs contract for the Richmond Police 
Station through Dec. 31, 1991, and 
increase by $700 in order for the artist 
to correct the installation error made by 
the General Contractor ( funds to be work 
ordered by Police Dept . ) . 

Villaincourt Fountain 

Ellis O'Farrell Parking Garage 
Tonia Mcneil, Christopher Sproat , Marie 
Zeller, and Whisler-Patr i . 
Presentation of artist's proposal for 
lighting sculpture for Ellis - O'Farrell 
Parking Garage 

Mental Health Facility 

Susan Pontious 

A. Presentation of Artist's proposals 
for mural columns (Hilda Shum) and 
gazebo design (George Gonzales). 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
*r^54-9682 



B. Review of slides of work for 
possible purchase 

4:40 VII. Tenderloin Children's Playground 

Review of short list of candidates with guest 
jurors Diane Fuller and R. Tobin. 

5:10 VIII. Artist Initiated Project 

Scott Donahue 

Proposal to locate seven sculptures on 

lightpoles throughout the City. 



5:20 IX. Muni-Metro Turnaround 
Susan Pontious 
Review of finalists; interview dates 

5:30 X. Gateway Project 
Jill Manton 
Discussion of project procedures 

5:35 XI. Old Business 

5:45 Adjournment 



« 



MINUTES 

JOINT MEETING, VISUAL ARTS AND CIVIC DESIGN COMMITTEES 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1991 

The meeting was called to order at 2:45 p.m. 

Commissioners Present: 

Anne Healy - Chair, Visual Arts Committee 

John Kriken - Chair, Civic Design Committee 

Robert LaRocca 

Nancy Boas 

Staff Present: 

Joanne Chow Winship, Director 

Tonia Macneil 

Jill Manton 

I. Promenade Design Presentation 

Jill Manton explained that the Design Team for the 
Embarcadero Promenade Project had developed a new concept 
for the site in response to the concerns raised by various 
City agencies. Architect Stanley Saitowitz presented the 
proposal, stating that the team's goal is to retain a 
significant, memorable, singular element along the entire 
promenade. That element will be a line of glass embedded 
in the pavement, a glistening line retaining some of the 
qualities of water. The entire artists' project will 
occur within the 5 feet of the promenade closest to the 
marginal wharf. 

The glass line will pass through 3 repeated architectural 
elements which serve as seating and passage-ways: a 
series of 1 1/2'x 3'x 2' cast concrete blocks which will 
serve as seating placed in the area between the Boondocks 
and the Java House, a passage-way formed by parallel 24" 
high walls near the Bay Bridge and a series of long 
benches, interrupted every 30 feet along the remainder of 
the promenade. 

The glass line would be poured in place, but raised 
elements could be pre-cast, doweled and grouted into place 
and therefore removable in order to accommodate changes in 
future uses of the Port. 

Discussion centered around the benefits of mobility of the 
raised elements and public safety issues raised by the use 
of glass. Commissioner LaRocca stated that sand-blasting 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page 



of the glass surfaces would alleviate any safety concerns 
and referred to a similar use of glass block in the 
recently completed Marathon Plaza. 

Jill Manton asked for the Committees' endorsement of the 
proposed design concept, stating that the concept would 
then be submitted to an urban design consultant, Sasaki 
Associates, for review and to the Port Commission for 
their final approval. 

Commissioner Kriken stated that the ability of the design 
to respond to future changes in Port use is very 
desirable. Commissioner Healy commented positively on the 
aesthetic quality, translucency and mobility of the 
design. 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the design concept as 
presented by the team for the Embarcadero Promenade 
Project. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS: 

1. Ordered: Approval of design concept as 

presented by the design team of Stanely Saitowitz, Barbara 

Stauf f acher-Solomon and Vito Acconci for the Embarcadero 

Promenade Project. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm 



Page 



MINUTES 

REGULAR MEETING OF THE VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1991 



The meeting was called to order at 3:20 

Commissioners Present: 
Anne Healy - Chair 
Nancy Boas 
Robert LaRocca 

Staff Present: 

Joanne Chow Winship - Director 

Tonia Macneil 

Jill Manton 

Susan Pontious 

Debra Lehane 



I. Minutes for October 7, 1991 

Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve the Committee 
minutes of October 7, 1991. Commissioner Healy seconded. 
It was so moved. 

II. Policy: Discussion of Arts Commission Artist 
Selection Policy 

Joanne Chow Winship presented the draft of a comprehensive 
policy for the Public Art Program's Artist Selection 
Process. A major purpose of the new policy is to clarify 
and strengthen the Commission's commitment to equal 
opportunity, and client and community input. To these 
ends, specific guidelines are spelled out for advertising, 
recruitment and the composition of selection panels. 
After some discussion, the Committee agreed to hold a 
special meeting on the policy so that members might fully 
explore all of the issues raised. 

III. Consent Calendar 

Request for approval to extend Shelley Jurs contract for 
the Richmond District Police Station through December 31, 
1991, and to increase it by $700.00 in order for the 
artist to correct the installation error made by the 
General Contractor (funds to be work-ordered by the Police 
Department ) . 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page 



Commissioner Boas moved approval of the consent calendar. 
Commissioner Healy seconded. It was so moved. 

IV. Vaillaincourt Fountain 

Jill Manton reported on her attendance at an Embarcadero 
Citizen's Advisory Committee meeting to discuss the future 
of the Vaillaincourt Fountain. The architectural firm of 
ROMA has been selected to do a master plan study for the 
area liberated by the demolition of the Embarcadero 
Freeway, and the future of the fountain is one of the 
issues being studied. The fountain is owned by the City 
and County of San Francisco and was commissioned while the 
property was under the jurisdiction of the Redevelopment 
Agency. A determination must be made as to whether the 
Arts Commission will have a role in deciding the future of 
the fountain. A major concern will be compliance with the 
California State Art Preservation Act and the recent 
Federal legislation. No action was requested at this 
time . 

V. Art Enrichment: Ellis O'Farrell Garage 

Tonia Macneil introduced the artist Christopher Sproat who 
is developing a design for a work of art at the downtown 
parking facility. Members of the client agency, the 
private management corporation and the consulting 
architects were also present. 

Christopher Sproat presented his proposal for a lighting 
sculpture for the pedestrian walkway between Ellis and 
O'Farrell Streets. The proposed sculpture is constructed 
of black and stainless steel fixtures and fluorescent 
light tubing suspended from the ceiling the entire 275' 
length of the walkway, creating a kind of overhead lighted 
"backbone" through the building. 

Richard Dole, Chairman of the Board of the Ellis O'Farrell 
Parking Corporation acknowledged the Board's interest in 
and support of the artist's proposal. 

The Commissioners requested that examples of actual 
materials and if possible, a full-scale prototype be 
brought before them at a future meeting. 

Commissioner Healy moved to approve the artist's concept 
for a lighting sculpture for the Ellis-0 ' Farrell Parking 
Garage. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page - 4 



VI- Art Enrichment: Mental Health Facility 

Susan Pontious presented the maquettes for artwork 
proposed by Hilda Shum and George Gonzalez. Hilda Shum 
proposes to paint 8 columns in a recreation room, using an 
overall atmospheric treatment referencing natural 
environments. The Commissioners commented positively on 
the proposal, and expressed a preference in general for a 
low intensity palette. 

George Gonzalez proposes a five-sided pavilion for the 
Facility's grounds entitled "Wu Xing", based on the five 
elements of traditional Chinese medicine: Fire, Earth, 
Metal Water, Wood. References to the five elements are 
made throughout the pavilion, for instance, a central 
granite rock will contain a small bubbling fountain. 

Commissioner Boas moved to approve the maquettes by Hilda 

Shum and George Gonzalez for art work at the Mental Health 

Facility. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 

Susan Pontious showed slides of works of art she proposes 
to purchase for the facility. She has been working 
closely with Hilda Shum to identify 43 pieces of 2- 
dimensional work to be located in public and recreation 
rooms throughout the center. The budget for the project 
is $75,000, which must also cover the cost of framing. 
Most of the works will be in the range of 22 x 30" and 
cost from $1,000 to $3,000. A few larger pieces are being 
considered for public rooms with prices of up to $5,000. 
About half of the art work has been identified at this 
point. No action was taken at this time. 

VII. Art Enrichment: Tenderloin Playground 

Selection of the artist for the Tenderloin Playground has 
been postponed for another month. Jill Manton asked that 
the Committee consider instead Art Enrichment for the 
Portsmouth Square Park, a substitution which had been 
approved by Joanne Chow Winship. She introduced Debra 
Learner, Recreation and Park Department planner and 
Shannon Maloney, landscape architect, who are working on 
the redesign of the park. 

Ms. Maloney explained that due to the redesign and 
enlargement of the lower park area, the art work 
originally created by artist Mary Fuller should be 
relocated and enhanced to fit into the larger area. Her 
original design was developed during the 1970's and 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page 



implemented in 1984. It is relatively easy to move, and 
in the process, necessary repairs could be made. The 
artist appreciates the possibilities and is in favor of 
the idea. Jill Manton stated that because of Mary 
Fuller's participation, there would be no conflict with 
the provisions of the California Art Preservation Act. 

The Recreation and Parks Department would provide funds to 
move the artwork and make repairs, in addition to the 
available Art Enrichment budget of $16,000. Commissioners 
requested that staff return with a design proposal and a 
detailed budget showing which funds are expended for art 
work and which for relocation and repair. Concern was 
also expressed that the artist be properly reimbursed for 
her work and that design and safety issues be resolved in 
a way that retains the original art work. 

Commissioner Healy moved to authorize staff to work with 
the artist Mary Fuller to expand on her original concept 
for art work at the Portsmouth Square Play Area. 
Commissioner Boas seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

VIII. Artist Initiated Project 

Susan Pontious presented Scott Donahue's proposal to 
locate seven sculptures on light poles throughout the 
city. While the Commissioners expressed interest in the 
proposal, they had questions which could not be answered 
by staff and requested that the artist come before the 
Committee to present the concept himself. 

IX. Art Enrichment: Muni-Metro Turnaround 

Susan Pontious stated that four semi-finalists were 
approved by the Selection Panel for the Muni-Metro 
Turnaround Project. They are: Robert Miller, R.M. 
Fisher, Nina Yankowitz and Carl Cheng. 

Because the architect's design must be 60% complete by 
February 1, there is a need to bring the artist on board 
immediately. Candidates will be interviewed by the 
Selection Panel as soon as possible, hopefully in the 
first week of November, after which the selected artist 
will begin work immediately. Although the artist's 
contract will be with Bechtel Corporation, Arts Commission 
approval of the artist is ultimately needed. 

Manton asked that the Committee approve the selection of 
the 4 candidates, with the understanding that one of the 4 
finalists will be selected and will begin working prior to 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page 



the next meeting of the Visual Arts Committee. 
Commissioner Healy moved to approve the request, and 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

X. Art Enrichment: Gateway Project 

Jill Manton reported that she will meet with artist Mark 
Di Suvero to discuss a contract which would fulfill the 
Arts Commission's need for prior approval of artist's 
proposals without unduly impeding the artist's creative 
process. She suggested that a combination of sketches, 
studio visits and photo-documentation might serve to meet 
the Committee's concerns. Discussion followed concerning 
the extent of the Commission's influence over an artist's 
work habits. The Committee was reminded that the 
Commission has a charter responsibility to approve 
proposals or maquettes before the placement of a work of 
art. No action was required at this meeting. 

OLD BUSINESS 

XI. Art Enrichment: Library 

Susan Pontious asked that the Committee approve an 
increase in the design fees for Alice Aycock because a 
recent meeting with the architects had articulated the 
need for an increased scope of work for the artist. The 
fee would be increased from $15,000 to $18,000. 
Commissioner Boas moved to approve the request. 
Commissioner Healy seconded. It was so moved. 

Susan Pontious gave an update of the progress of the other 
artists' proposals for the Library. The architects are 
requesting all information from the artists which would 
affect the architecture by December 1. However, Anne 
Hamilton is largely unavailable to make the creative and 
technical decisions necessary in order to meet that 
deadline. The Commission has been reluctant to turn the 
creative role over to the artist's collaborator, Anne 
Chamberlain, however if the Commission would allow 
Chamberlain to work on these issues, and Hamilton and 
Chamberlain could reach an agreement, then work could go 
forward. The Committee agreed that staff should write a 
letter to Anne Hamilton expressing the Commission's 
concern that she acknowledge her contractual obligations 
on this project. 

Pontious continued with a description of recent revisions 
in Nayland Blake's proposal. The wall backing his art 
work will be smaller than originally planned, therefore 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page 



there will be fewer lights. The dangling wires were not 
feasible and have been deleted from the design. The new 
design will use a colored mirror facing the wall with the 
name sandblasted onto the silver backing. The mirror can 
be tilted to cast a colored light image onto the backing 
wall. A prototype will be available for the next Visual 
Arts Committee meeting. 

XII. Art Enrichment: Market Street Seeding 

Project 

Jill Manton explained that she had requested a study and 
design fee for the sound artist Bill Fontana to explore 
the possibilities of piping the sound of the Castro Street 
Organ into the Underground Muni Station at Castro Street. 
The artist has now developed an implementation budget of 
from $3,000 to $5,000. He also proposes extending the 
idea to include the ambient sounds of the neighborhood. 
Therefore Manton requested that the Committee approve a 
total fee for the project not to exceed $10,000. 
Commissioner Healy moved to approve the request, 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 

XII. Art Enrichment: Market Street Master Plan 

Jill Manton requested that the Committee approve an 
increase of $326.24 in the contract for Delaney and 
Cochran for the Market Street Master Plan in order to 
accommodate the payment of sales tax. Commissioner Healy 
moved to approve the request, Commissioner LaRocca 
seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

NEW BUSINESS 

XIV. Arts Commission Gallery Director Anne Meissner 
introduced Glen Helfand, a member of the Gallery 
Curatorial Committee, who presented his proposal for an 
exhibition in late February and March of 1992 entitled 
Real Tears . 

Mr. Helfand showed slides of work by some of the proposed 
artists and explained that the exhibition would push the 
post-modernist idea of appropriated art works into the 
90' s, to a point where the artist-appropriator becomes 
more present in the work and the use of funky materials is 
a conscious choice. 

Commissioner Healy stated that the exhibition concept is 
an interesting and intelligent one and that it would be 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page - 



appropriate to communicate the Committee's support for the 
idea and ask for a vote of the full Commission at the 
November meeting. 

Meissner gave the Committee information about the new 
exhibition Frontiers at the Gallery and Charles Gute's 
piece at Exploration: City Site which opened to the public 
on Thursday, October 24. 

Meissner thanked the Commissioners for their ideas for the 
Chain Reaction Exhibition. For the upcoming exhibition, 
Meissner proposes to invite writers to start the chain, 
along with the 6 members of the Gallery Advisory 
Committee. She presented a list of writers from which 6 or 
8 will be selected to participate. 

Commissioner Healy asked for an update on the status of 
the Advisory Committee at the Gallery. She went on to 
state for the record that the Committee's action in regard 
to the proposed exhibition by former member of the 
Gallery's Advisory Board Tony Labat had at least one 
unpleasant result. According to Commissioner Healy, the 
restaurant's owner objected to the way Labat was treated 
by the Arts Commission and therefore fired Healy 's 
daughter from her job of two years. 

XV. Staff Report: Embarcadero Plaza 

At the request of Commissioners, Jill Manton reported on 
the staus of the Embarcadero Plaza Planning Study. 
Originally, the Planning Commission had intended to award 
a planning study to a design team which included an urban 
designer, landscape architect, pedestrian planner, public 
artist and cost estimator. However, HRC requested that 
the Department divide the work into many small contracts 
in order to allow more minority and women to compete for 
the work. A scope of work for a Public Art study was 
developed, and most of the applicants were art consultants 
and not artists. The Planning Commission selected Helene 
Fried, Keilani Tom and Tom Marioni for the Public Art 
contract . 

The Commissioners expressed their concern that the Public 
Art component should be under Arts Commission jurisdiction 
and asked that staff consult with City Attorney Louise 
Renne re: responsibility for Public Art and Public Art 
contracts. The issue will be brought up before the Arts 
Commission at the next regular meeting. 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page 



Manton reported in addition that at the recommendation of 
staff from the mayor's office, she has made a request for 
the funding of art enrichment for the Embarcadero mid- 
section of $1.86 million, which includes funding for the 
signage and promenade projects in that area as well as 
other projects which will be recommended as a result of 
the Embarcadero Plaza Study. 

The meeting was adjourned at 6 p.m. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS: 

1. Ordered: Approval of minutes of October 9, 1991 
Visual Arts Committee Meeting. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Authorization to extend Shelly Jurs 
contract for the Richmond District Police Station through 
December 31, 1991, and to increase the fee by $700.00 in 
order for artist to correct installation error made by 
General Contractor (funds to be work ordered by Police 
Department ) . 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

3. Ordered: Approval of design concept presented 
by Christopher Sproat for a light sculpture for the Ellis- 
O'Farrell Parking Garage. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: Approval of Hilda Shum's maquette for 
painted treatment of columns in the interior of the Mental 
Health Facility and George Gonzales' maquette for the 
design of a pavilion for the gardens of the Mental Health 
Facility. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Authorization for the Arts Commission 
to work with the artist Mary Fuller to expand her concept 
for the playground area of the Portsmouth Square Park, in 
fulfillment of the art enrichment requirement. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN1023.91-twm Page - 10 



6. Ordered: Approval of four finalists for the 
Muni Metro Turnaround Project with understanding that one 
artist will be selected by the Selection Panel and will 
begin working before the next Visual Arts Committee 
Meeting in November. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: Approval of an increase in artist 
Alice Aycock's design fee for the new Main Library from 
$15,000 to $18,000 due to increase in scope of work. 
Moved: Commissioner Boas 

Vote: Unanimous 

8. Ordered: Approval of an increase in the fee for 
Bill Fontana for design and implementation of the Castro 
Theatre/Muni Project to an amount not to exceed $10,000. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

9. Ordered: Approval of modification of the 
contract with Delaney and Cochran for work on the Market 
Street Art Master Plan to increase the fee by $326.24 to 
reimburse for unanticipated sales tax. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



Submitted: 



Tonia Macneil 

Curator, Public Art Program 



Approved : 




Joann^ Chow Winship 
Director, Department of 
Cultural Affairs 



VAC-MIN102 3.91-twm 



Page 



11 



HI 



DATE: October 11, 1991, 1991 

PROJECT: Richmond District Police Station 

PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macneil 

BUDGET: $30,000 plus architectural credits 

BEGINNING DATE: 1990 

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE: September, 1991 



REQUESTED ACTION: Extend contract to December 31, 1991 
and increase contract amount by $700.00 

BACKGROUND: The artwork by Shelley Jurs and Jaap Bongers 
has been installed at the Richmond District Police 
Station, as reported at the last Visual Arts Committee 
meeting. However, the building contractor inadvertently 
installed the architectural glass in the transoms 
incorrectly. The Police Department has agreed to fix the 
error, and will provide the funds to do so. Shelley will 
work with a glass installer of her choice to make the 
change. The contract must be extended in order to pay her 
a small fee to pay a subcontractor for the work. 



3T 



PROJECT: Ellis-O'Farrel] Parking Garage 

PROJECT MANAGER: Tonia Macnei] 

BUDGET: $55,000 plus architectural credits 

BEGINNING DATE: March, 1991 

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE: Spring, 1993 

REQUESTED ACTION: Review and approval of artist's proposed 
concept . 

BACKGROUND: At the July 31, 1991 Visual Arts Committee 
meeting, lighting artist Christopher Sproat of New York 
was selected to design, fabricate and install a work of 
art for the Ellis-0 ' Farrell Garage. 

The artist has developed a proposal for a lighting 
sculpture for the pedestrain walkway and will present his 
concept to the Committee at the October 23 meeting. 

During t lie last two months, the artist has been working to 
develop the concept arid a workable budget. He has made a 
site visit, and has been in close contact with the 
architects and client to solve budget and technical 
issues. The E 1 1 i s-0 ' Far rel 1 Parking Corporation as well 
as the architects are very enthusiastic about the artist's 
design and have made considerable efforts to explore 
possible changes to their design necessitated by his 
proposal. The budget for this project is a small one, 
however the client, has agreed to increase the art budget 
by the amount of money which will be saved by replacing 
existing or planned lighting elements. 

The proposed light sculpture would in fact completely 
replace lighting for the 275' pedestrian walkway and lobby 
area of the garage. It will be constructed of black and 
silver- metal elements and unusually-shaped flourescent 
tubing. The sculpture would be composed of -12 light 
'units' spaced 8' apart and connected by light tubes and 
structural elements. The units would be attached to the 
cei I i ng by painted metal tubing. 

Drawings are enclosed which partially illustrate the 
artist's concept., however tin full explanation of the 
proposal will be made by the art ist himself on the 23rd. 



~W 



Scott Donahue 
1420 45th Street 
Emeryville, CA 94608 
415-658-5182 



San Francsico Art Commission 

25 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco CA September 18, 1991 



RE: Proposal for Lightpole Sculpture 

Dear Visual Arts Committee, 

I'm a sculptor living in the Bay Area since 1977. I've completed several public art 
projects and have displayed sculpture in outdoor public spaces in San Francisco including 
sculpture adhered to the inside and outside of the Arts Commission Gallery windows. 

PUBLIC ART BACKGROUND 

My first public art project was unfunded and is relevant to my current proposal. In 1983, 
fourteen sculptures were installed on lightpoles at a 10 foot height through out San 
Francisco, Berkeley, Oakland and Emeryville. Three of these sculptures were up for over 
five years and the project generated a lot of positive public sentiment. There were no legal 
problems or negative actions by any public agencies about these sculptures and the 
lightpoles were left in their original condition when the sculptures were removed. 

My next Public art project was "Sculpture for Twenty Buses" in New Brunswick, New 
Jersey, 1986. Four sculptures were adhered to the inside and outside of each back window 
of the Rutgers University campus buses. This project was funded by the University Art 
Department and the bus company. 

My third project was "Five Floating Heads" on Lake Merritt in Oakland. Five cast 
sculptures floated up and down with the tide. This competition was funded by the 
Festival of The Lake. 

My most recent project has been "Six Bronze Medallions" which were set in the 
sidewalk of Palo Alto and completed in 1991 . 

MY PROPOSAL 

I propose to locate seven new lightpole sculptures in San Francisco. The piece consists 
of an ear and a brain, to be installed 1 1 feet high on selected lightpoles without signage. 



HIE LOCATION 

I propose to locate the pieces in a variety of neighborhoods, including Downtown, The 
Mission, Hunters Point, South of Market, The Beach, Pacific Heights. 

THE COLORS 

While the form of each sculpture will remain the same, the color will vary depending on 
the particulars of the sight. The colors however, will in no way have any racial symbolism 
or connotations to any specific culture whatsoever. 

THE DURATION 

The sculptures will remain up until the agency controlling that lightpole needs it removed 
for a functional purpose, (signage, etc.) or until the sculptures just disappear. The 
lightpoles will remain in their found condition upon removal. 

THE FUNDING 

No cost to the city of San Francisco. 

SAFETY 

The engineering parameters such as weight, wind loading, attachment, etc. are the same 
as the city signage. The agency that controls the lightpole will give approval. 

SPECIFICATIONS 

The sculpture is made of FGR 95 and fiberglass, and made chip resistant by penetrating 
epoxy sealer. The mounting hardware is stainless steel and steel. 

LIABILITY INSURANCE 

The existing liability insurance covers the city for claims made by the public. I will hold 
the city harmless if the sculptures are damaged or stolen. 

POSSIBLE MEANING TO THE PUBLIC 

In a survey on San Pablo Avenue in Emeryville on September 16, 1991 the responses 
were that this sculpture has something to do with hearing. On longer reflection, some 
thought it had to do with the virtue of listening. One person imagined that the sculpture had 
something to do with assisting the deaf and the blind when crossing the street. 



Thank you for your consideration of this proposal. 



Sincerely, 



Scott Donahue 




25 Von Ness Avenue 
Sutt* 340 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 

Borbora Sktar 
President 

Noncy Boos 
Vice President 

Vernon Aley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Daniel Genera 
AmeHeoly 
John Krlken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Genny Um 

Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph.D. 
Dfa'J Okamoto 
| i Rosekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



AGENDA 

SPECIAL SESSION of the VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1991 

3 P.M. 

25 VAN NESS, SUITE 70 

I. Art Enrichment: Moscone Center/Howard Street 

A. Presentation and discussion of Moscone 
Center/Howard Street art enrichment proposal 

Daniel Martinez 
Renee Petropoulos 
Roger White 

B. Public Testimony 

C. Question and Answer Period 

II. Adjournment 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Wlnshlp 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMC Art Collection 
CMC Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
41^554-9682 

L 



MINUTES 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

SPECIAL MKETING 

NOVEMBER 8, 199 1 

Co mm Lssi oners Present : 
Vnne Heal y , I 'ha i r 
\mi-i I i a Me sa - Ba i ns 

.mi. Boas 
Robe rt I aRocca 

Staff Present: 

J - mi ne ( li.iw w Lnship , I) i rec tor 
.Mil Man I on 
! . 1 1 1 1 1 Mai 1 1 ' ■ i I 

lli" monl i ne; Kns ca j | p, r ) j- i0 order at, 3:05 p.m. 

I. Ait. Enr i chment : Moscone Center/Howard Street 

A . Presentation of Artist's Proposal . 
Roger White, Renee Pet roponlos , and Daniel Martinez 
explained their proposal "This Isa Nice Neighborhood" for 
Moscone Center at Howard Street. The Committee was reminded 
of the criteria the artists had been asked to address and 
the process through which the artists had developed their 

on • pi . The artists described the conceptual basis for 
. i li of the five elements of the proposal and the design 
criteria each element addressed. 

I ii response to the Committee's concerns about the use of 
language, the team explained that they had selected a phrase 
which had been used several times during the finalists' 
orientation session, that the phrase was open-ended, 
offering opportunities for many interpretations both now and 
in the future, and that the phrase was, in their opinion, as 
innocuous as they could imagine. 

In response to the issue of maintenance, the artists said 
that they were looking into the possibility of using fiber 
optics. Also under consideration is elimination of all 
electrical elements, substituting reflective metallic paint 
instead. This would eliminate about $90,000 from the 
budget . 

The artists stated that the budget problems could be 
addressed by altering the project. One alternative is to 
remove the bridges entirely, leaving the other four elements 
of the design, however there is still a need to address the 
Commission's criteria of creating a sense of gateway, 
welcome and landmark. 



twm-MIN118.91 



Page 



The artists stated that they believe that the proposaJ 
presented in June had addressed ail of the issues the 
Commission had asked them to consider during the proposal 
phase . 



B. Public Testimony. 

The folloxving individuals addressed the Committee with 

comments on the proposed sculpture: 

Sue Bierman, Friends of Yerba Buena Center 

Mardi Burnham 

Graham Chaffee 

Douglas Clark 

Dino Di Donato, South of Market Problem Solving Coun 

John Elberling, Yerba Buena Consortium 

Diana Fuller 

Ann Gi ampaol i 

Sue Hestor, Friends of Yerba Buena Center 

Ephraim G. Hirsch, San Francisco Beautiful 

Terry Mi lne 

Lorraine Garcia-Nakata , CA . State Summer School for Mr rl 

Barry Ph illips 

Francis H. Rigney, M.D. 

Public testimony included the following points: 

1. The proposal has merit, but needs rei Lnement . 

2. It is impossible to please everyone. The proposal lias 
become a political football. 

3. The language brings up unpopular truths. 

4. The language used on the word bridges is 
inappropriate. It has a pejoratixe meaning. The 
Language used on the sidewalk is banal . 

5. The proposal is not consistent with the aesthel i 
values of several of the speakers. 

b. The area has many different uses ami me inings. It is 
primarily a pedestrian environment. 1 lie proposaJ 
not take all these issues into account. 

7. A local artist should have been chosen. 

8. This is an inappropriate use of public funds. 



twm-MINl 1 8. !)1 



1 ' a g e 



' • Question and Answer 
Commissioner Healy opened discussion to the Committee for 
LOH! ind comment s . 

i ss Loner Hea I y : 
"] have a question for the artists: you removed the 
bridges once before and basically you could leave them 
out or you could leave it the way it is. If the bridges 

ed, could you address the feasibility of keeping 
i he br i dges? " 

"Whal you did is showed vis one thing and then you 

showed us another, but you didn't tell us exactly what 

you were thinking of doing or even any kind of 

direction, and I'm curious about that." 

Kenee Pe l ropou I os : 

"We wanted to go through the whole project...." 

I <imm i ss i one V Hea 1 y : 

"No, you went through the whole project but we on the 
Committee are concerned about the language, budget, 
maintenance and technical feasibility. Those were 
areas we asked you to address at the meeting at which 
the proposal was selected and through correspondence 
since then. If you can, I'd like you to take them one 
at a time and fell us what your thoughts are about 
t hem . " 

Henee Petropoulos: 

"Regarding the technical feasibility, we originally 
wanted to tie into the schedule of Moseone II being 
built; the foundations being built at the same time. I 
think some of that timing has past and that the 
building is ongoing, being built, and I think probable- 
it wouldn't tie into that schedule at all at this 
po int." 

"Mow we are at. least understanding that there is this 
huge problem in terms of spanning the street, just as 
an issue in and of itself, regardless of what spans the 
street and finding out recently that it took five years 
to get the pedestrian bridges approved. It could be a 
problem in terms of expenditure in spending that kind 
of time pushing something through and maybe not having 
it £o through for all sorts of reasons that are beyond 
this Commission and beyond us." 

"So that's something we're concerned with and why we 
removed them . 



twm-MIKl 18.91 



Page - 3 



Commissioner Heaiy: 

"Actually most of the concerns revolved around the 
sculpture spanning the street; the concerns of 
maintenance, budget, and feasibility." 

Renee Petropoulos: 

"In terms of the budget, by altering the use of the 
neon, we would probably reduce the budget by almost 
$90 to $100,000.00. So already we are knocking off 
an incredible chunk." 

Commissioner Healy: 

"I guess what I'm interested in is will the sculptures 
continue to span the street..." 



Daniel Martin 
"To expl 
the solu 
the brid 
concerns 
revisi ti 
problem 
point on 
been the 
asked th 
ex i sted 
what you 
to come 
quite fl 
needs to 
able to 



ain the thought process alio 
tion and the point of remov 
_es being removed, should r 
. What we say as a team i s 
ng what the concerns of the 
that was presented to us as 
ly you can revisit what thi 

opportunity for us, regard 
ose questions before, the o 
in an appropriate manner fo 
're talking about. So we h 
to the point to say that we 
exible in addressing those 

be investigated further th 
present . " 



ut hov> we arrived a i 
i ng the bridges . . . 
emove a 1 1 you r 
that we ait- open to 

part it ular 

a team . At t h.il 
s is. There has not 
less of wh e t h e i yon 
pport unity has no1 
r us to l n est l gat e 
ave on I \ been able 

are quite open and 
i ssues i ii a way i ha1 
an tliis mode 1 was 



Renee Petropoulos: 

"And that's because it. was only a week ago thai we were 
told that this was even feasible to address i t 
differently while still retaining what this 
symbolically is dealing with, we would have to rethink 
how to approach that without spanning the Min i ." 

Daniel Martinez: 

"Only two options are being presented. One op1 ion i s 
to do the project as is to fulfill the concerns thai 
you have brought to our attention, in order to do that , 
that would require an extremely radical alteration of 
the project conceptually, and because of the things we 
have been notified of from different agencies, I hat 
might or might not be possible, so in other wi id:-., in 
older to answer the question in the way I know that you 
want to answer the quest ion, we need to then come up 
with an enti rely new idea, and that requ i res .... " 



twm-MINl 18.91 



Page 



Re nee Pel ropou] os : 

"Mo l ,-i new one, we want to do one based on this idea, 
bu1 net spanning t lie street...." 

i 'mum issi one r Hea I j : 

"Because when you lose the sculptures spanning the 
street, which you reiterated when you took them off, 
you loose the gateway, the significance of the 
i onnect ion between the two sides of the street, the 
liylit change, night into day, and addressing the 
horizontal ity of the site. And that concerns me." 

Ronee Petropoulos: 

We would really have to reconvene to solve this around 
the same concept, but not to span the street. So we 
would eliminate that whole set of problems." 

Commissioner Mesa-Bains: 

Commissioner Mesa-Bains commented that this meeting is an 
opportunity to get different points of view about how people 
relate to Public Art. The art work which is being 
commissioned "has to contend with the disparities between 
enormous corporate and civic development and the lives of 
Individuals and historic communities." 

The Commissioner noted that scale is a primary issue for 
people. On the one hand pedestrians are impacted by the 
scale, on the other the scale has created a civic quality of 
of gateway and passage. However the incongruous issues of 
this site are solved, the work of art which is commissioned 
will live beyond the individuals making the decision. It 
will be part of the future of the City, part of the 21st 
Century. If we make decisions about modifications to the 
project, it is important to keep the spirit that was brought 
to designing it, which is provocative and intelligent, 
recognizes the local, national and international communities 
and uses language to create a dialogue with it's 
surround ings . 

The Commissioner expressed the hope that at some point the 
Commission would work directly with the members of the local 
communities, particularly communities of color and the 
elderly, rather than their political representatives. 

Commissioner LaRocca: 

Commissioner LaRocca stated that the Commission's objective 
was to create a great urban space in the YBC complex, on a 
world-class basis. He said that the artists have made a 
strong effort to achieve that through an exciting use of 
graphics on a large scale, which ties the two blocks 

twm-MINl 18.91 Page - 5 



together. Considering the review process, the artists 
should be looking at some new ideas which carrj thi same 
strength and capture the same scale, the same spirit. 

La Rocca said that the artists should not be held back from 
working with the street as part of t lie art. "Ideas have 
changed over the centuries .... We have to allow artists to 
look forward, create new ideas." We are in a zone of 
transition, into the year 2000, where artists are attempting 
to look at major spaces, major landscapes, and it is not 
like what you have known in the past, what is recognizable 
as good, bad or beautiful. These new interactions may be 
nervewracking , however these artists do dare to sLand up and 
attempt to solve the problem. 

The issues of spanning the street are politit.il, planning 
issues. But "I would hate to see us back awa; and not show 
leadership in the city." It would be better not to do a 
project than to compromise, with multiple decisions by n 
groups. The artists' interests, their creativity should 
come forth. 

With further study, further revision, something could 
develop which maintains the excitement and strength of the 
current proposal . 

Commissioner Boas: 

Commissioner Boas noted that she had attended the artists' 
briefing and that she did not feel that the points she and 
others had raised at that time had been considered by the 
artists. Commissioner Boas' four points were: 

1. The site is a Civic Center for the 90's. It has gotten 
a great deal of civic attention and has a significant 
history which should have been looked into. 

2. The Verba Buena complex has many facets Lo it, all of 
which needed to be considered. One should designate a sense 
of arrival, a sense of identity for Moscone within that 
larger context. 

3. We wanted an artwork which was not interchangeable with 
any other art work in any other city, that was specific to 
this city and it's character. The art was lo he presented 
not only for our citizens but for everyone who is going to 
visit here. 

4. The Arts Commission and other commissions worked ver> 
hard to feature pedestrians over the person in the 
automobile in this area. 



twm-MlNl 18.91 



Page 



Commissioner Boas further stated that she was not in favor 

ie i inguage of the bridges, that it does not reflect the 
knowledge of this community of those who actually live here. 
The Language on the sidewalk she also considered banal. 

Renee Petri >pou 1 os : 

In response to Commissioner Boas, Renee Petropoulos replied 
that if one views the arches from the level of a pedestrian, 
they are complete] y engaging of the pedestrian, in fact all 
consideral Lon was given to people walking by them. The 
sculptures create complex shadows which directly engage the 
pedestrian, which would not be seen by cars. The sidewalk 
phrases are a proposal. They are not fixed. The artists' 
goal was to address the pedestrian in both the personal and 
pub Lie Level . 

Pel ropoulos further noted that the team had compiled an 
extensive book of articles on the history of the area, and 
thai the history was the reason for the selected phrase. 
"The i<lea that this was once a particular kind of 
neighborhood, a certain group of people; it's now been 
reconstructed ... .was pivotal in our choices." 

\k far as the applicability of the design to San Francisco, 
tin artist replied that the City has many points of 
reference for industrial steel bolted- together structures, 
such as the Golden Gate Bridge and Bay Bridge. The 
sculptures are not alien structures. 



Commissioner He 
"For mysel 
lie re , we h 
solu t i on t 
street a p 
various ma 
a unity, 
use of the 
it. I t hi 
sen J ptures 
walks on t 
it's wonde 
team of a r 
wonderful 
w h i c h has 
changes , v 
piob 1 ems w 
perhaps pr 



a 1 y : 
f I 
ave 
o a 
iece 
sses 
i th 

Ian 
nk t 

tha 
hese 
rful 
t ist 
that 
Just 
aria 
hich 
olile 



think there are many issues on the table 
what I consider a very brilliant and bold 
very difficult problem of making the 
of sculpture and engaging all of the 
and forms of very disparate buildings in 
ink that the use of the graphics and the 
guage has a 21st century quality about 
hat these are not bridges, these are 
t happen to span the street. No one 
, these are not bridges. I think that 

I have a lot of confidence in this 

s and I think that it's extraordinary and 

they are willing to engage in a process 

begun over the last few months of making 

tions, coming up with other solutions to 

have been discussed here today and 
ms that we on the Commission see." 



"1 think that what this piece has done, it's touched on 
some buttons in the City. Number one, the scale is 
incredible, it's urban design scale. That has stepped 



twm-MINl 18.91 



Page 



on a lot of toes, I think, as far as architects and 
city planners go. This is the way public sculpture is 
developing. It is addressing issues that do verge on 
urban design and architecture and rightfully should. I 
think another button that was very much pushed in this 
situation is the xenophobic layer that is present in 
San Francisco that people who live in San Francisco 
really feel that they know what San Francisco should 
tool; like and of course everybody has a differenl Idea 
of what that is. The kind of romantic Hollywood set 
look that most people who when they say that '1 know 
what San Francisco should look like', allude to, is 
really what has, I think, stopped a lot of v< 
interesting architecture from being built in this city. 
That and a very significant Planning Commission 
situation called the Downtown Plan. This has been in 
affect for 10 years and it keys right into that 
xenophobic, romantic Hollywood 'let's keep San 
Francisco looking like it was in 1906. ' Well it's not 
1906 any more. And what we have are buildings with 
facades that relate to an architectural vocabulary thai 
is over, and what is going to happen to this city is 
that it's going to become the Disneyland of Northern 
California because it really doesn't have any reality 
in what is happening in urban design or architecture." 

"And I think that this piece has suffered a lot from 
hitting those buttons. And everything is political. 
This has become a political football. It is no Longer 
just a work of art. This has become something that has 
become a pawn between various agencies in the city and 
between various political factions in the city and 
that's a very heavy burden for any work of art to 
handle. I feel very strongly that I'd like to continue 
working with these artists. I think they do have a 
grasp of what's going on in this neighborhood and what 
has gone on in this neighborhood in a political process 
that basically destroyed this neighborhood and did make 
it somewhat of a corporate alleyway. The neighborhood 
that was there no longer exists and I think some people 
have very guilty consciences about that, and don't want 
to remind themselves that this was a neighborhood and 
maybe it no longer is. I want to continue working with 
these artist. I have a great deal of confidence in 
their ability to solve any problems that we have 
suggested or might come up. And I want to thank them 
for making such a spirited, enthusiastic and not 
defensive explanation of their proposal and 1 want to 
thank you all for coming." 



twm-MINl 18.91 



Page - 8 



\ member of the audience inquired as to the next step in the 
process . 



Commissioner Heaiy: 
" Wha I we 're goi 
the art ists and 
meet i ngs w i th s 
concerns , like 
represenl peopl 
sen I ptures whic 
they ' re not scu 
P 1 ami i ng Commis 
of course i s no 
and mon t lis , wh i 
cons I rue t i on bu 
would help thei 



ng to do is go into a long dialogue with 

we'd like to open up and have various 
ome of the groups that have special 
the neighborhood and people who 
e in the neighborhood and then these are 
h span the street we have been told 
lptures, they're now bridges, and the 
sion now has to do an EIR on that, which 
t going to be done for months and months 
ch means that they can't tie into the 
dget which we thought they could which 
r own budget . " 



"So the process we are now going to engage in right now 
are a series of meetings with the artists and with the 
community and with planners and see what's going to 
happen, what we're going to come up with." 

i "lit Lnuing quest ions from the audience focused on the 
process by which meetings are communicated to the public. 
The public is informed through the publication of the agenda 
anil posting of the agenda in the public library and at the 
Arts Commission. Because of the interest of the press in 
this issue the public may also expect to read about it in 
t he news . 



A member of 
Comm i ss i on ' 
Commi ss i on 
the ballot. 
the pub 1 i c , 
case in poi 
process of 
the need to 
successful , 
i nvol vement 



t he audience 

s dec i s ion-mak 

is final . The 

However, the 

and pub.l ic te 

nt being the G 

commi ss ion ing 

go beyond the 

and efforts a 

in the proces 



asked for clarification of the 
ing powers. The decision of the 
re is no appeal process other than 

Commission's meetings are open to 
stimony is heard and respected, a 
oddess of Democrary issue. The 
public art is designed to alleviate 

Commission. So far it has been 
re ongoing to increase public 
s. No vote was taken at this time. 



The meeting was adjourned at 5:15 p.m. 



Submi t t ed : 



1/onia Macneil ^ 

Curator, Public Art Program 



Approved : 




t\pan/ne Chow Winship 
Director of Cultural 
Affairs 



twm-MINl J 8. 91 



Page 



AGENDA K()|{ UKGUl.AU VISUAL AIM'S COMMITTEE MEETING 

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20, 1991 

3 l J . M . 

2ft VAN NKSS, SUITE 70 



3 : 00 I . 
1 I . 



Approval of Oct. 23, 199 1 Minutes 

Consent. Calendar 

A. Approval to extend Alan Fleming's 

cr on I i act for Kezar Stadium Gates 

Lli rough Dec . 3 1, 1991 . 



B. Approval to formally deaccession two 
sculptures by Robert Irwin, 
Black/White C'erenionial Gates, 

Pac i f ic/Asiun Port of Entry, due to 
their irreparable damage and 
destruction as a result of the Loma 
I'r i c I a Ea r L hcjuake . 

C. Approval to relocate George 
Washington Sculpture (after Houdin) 
from I he George Moscone School to 
the Fine Arts Museum as per request 
of the War Memorial. 



3:05 Til 



Policy Discussion: Mul t i -Cul tural 
Representation 

Joanne ('how W.i nsh i p/J ill Manton 
Discussion of greater mu 1 t i -cu 1 t ural 
representation on selection panels, 
commissioned artists, and in development 
of project parameters and criteria. 



3:20 IV, 



Art Enrichment: Moscone/lloward St, 
Joanne ("how Winship/Jill Manton 
Project assessment and procedural 
decision 



3:30 V, 



Artist Initiated Project: Lightpole 
Sculptures; Scott. Donahue 



3:40 VT. 



Art Enrichment: Main Library 

Susan Pon I. ious 

A. Project Update 

B. Review of prototypes from Nayland 
Make and Ann Hamilton 

C. Revised Lothar Baumgarten proposal 



3:55 VII 



Art Enrichment: Mental Health Facility 
Susan l'ont i ous 

Request from Project Mana^pr for the 
Skilled Mental Health Nursing Facility to 
approve purchase of Emmanuel Montoya's 
Homage to Lydia Mendoza ($1,500) and La 
Trinidad Nortena ( $ I , -1 00 ) , and Carmen 
bomas Garza's Tamalada ($050). 



4 : 00 VIII. Gal lery 

Ann Me i ssne r 

Approval of Art ists for lff.il Tears 

exhibit, Feb. 2 7 - April 10, 1992 

Artists being considered are: Margaret 

Crane, Cliff Hongs t, Cary 

l.e i bow i I z/('andyass , Eric Ol t.er, Melissa 

Polorny, Leslie Singer- and Kevin 

Sul 1 i van . 



4 :20 IX, 



Market. St. 
Eleanor Heat on 

Approve Market. St . Advisory Panel Artist 
Recommendations : 

A. Photography Documentation 
1 . Jo Babcock 

2. Susan Schwar tzenberg 

3. Jim Goldberg 

I. Urenda Piaeger 

5. George Berticevich 

6. Crystal Huie 



Banner Series 

1 . Joe Sam 

2. Richard Armstrong 

3. James Lambertus 

4. Chester Yoshida 

5. Caryl Henry 

6. Enrique Chagoya 

7. Ester Hernandez 



4:30 X, 



Art Enrichment: 
Tonia Macne i I 
Artist. Selection 



Hay view Police Station 



4:45 XI 



Art Enrichment: Tenderloin Children's 
Playground: Jill Manton 
Artist Selection 



Page - 2 



5:00 XII. 



Art. Enrichmenl : 

Jill Manton 
Project update 



Gat.eway Project 



5:10 XIII 



5:20 XIV. 



5:30 XV. 



XVI 



Art Enrichment: Waterfront 
Transportation Projects. Jill Manton 
Promenade Riboon and Historical 
Interpretive Signage. 

New Art Enrichment 

A. Muni Metro East Facilities 
Jill Manton/ Barbara Moy 

B. Islais Creek Muni Facilities 
Jill Manton/kambiz Shandan 

I nf ormat ion 

Participation in S.O.S. (Save Our Outdoor 
Sculpture) survey through National 
Institute for the Conservation of 
Cultural Proparties (N.I.C.). 

Old Business 

Schedule for Policy Development and 
Rev i ew 



XVII. New Business 
5:45 Adjournment 




?5 Von New Avenue 

SUre 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



MINUTES 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

NOVEMBER 20, 1991 

The meeting was called to order at 3:15 p.m. 

Commissioners present: 
Anne Healy, Chair 
Barbara Sklar 
Robert LaRocca 
Nancy Boas 



COMMISSI ONERS 

Barbara Sklar 

President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 

Stanley Elchelbaum 

Daniel Genera 

Anne Healy 

John Krlken 

Robert F. LaRocca 

Genny Urn 

Amalla Mesa-Bains. Ph D 

Ral Y Okamoto 

Doaie Rasekrans 



Staff present: 

Joanne Chow Winship, Director 

Jill Manton 

Susan Pontious 

Tonia Macneil 

Debra Lehane 

I. Approval of Minutes of October 23, 1991 meeting 

The minutes of the October 23, 1991, Visual Arts Committee 
meeting were approved as read on a motion by Commissioner 
Boas. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission. 
Recreation ond Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Wlnshlp 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
CMC Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Licenses 



II. Revisions to the Agenda 

The following revisions were made in the agenda: 

Consent Calendar item #C . 

Removed from agenda 
IV. Art Enrichment: Moscone/ Howard Street 

Removed from agenda 
XI. Art Enrichment: Tenderloin Children's Playground 

In place of artist selection, staff will discuss 

the Selection Panel 
XIII. Art Enrichment: Waterfront Transportation Projects 

Addition of staff report on Muni Metro Project 

III. Consent Calendar 

A. Approval to extend Alan Fleming's contract for Kezar 
Stadium Gates through December 31, 1991. 



B. Approval to formally deaccession two sculptures by 
State Local Partnership Robert Irwin, Black/White Ceremonial Gates, Pacific/Asian 
415-554-9677 port of Entry due to their irreparable damage and 
415-554-9679 destruction as a result of the Loma Prieta Earthquake. 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
415-554-9682 



Item #C was removed at the request of staff. 



VAC-MINI 120. 91 -twin 



Page 



Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve Items A and B on the 
Consent Calendar. Commissioner Boas seconded. it was so 
moved . 

IV. Pol icy Discussion: Multi-Cultural 

Representation 

Jill Manton gave a brief report on issues related to 
multi-cultural representation, stating that she would 
provide a more comprehensive written report on the 
subject . 

Manton explained that there are both procedural and policy 
issues to be studied. Procedurally, staff outreach to 
multi-cultural artists and communities could be expanded, 
possibly by establishing community liaisons and meeting 
with communities on their own terms. 

The policy of selection of art work should be reviewed. 
Selection Panels need more than token multi-cultural 
representation. Currently, the Commission's final 
criteria for approval of art work is artistic excellence. 
Manton raised questions as to who determines the standard 
of excellence, whether there should be other standards and 
how these standards affect bringing new artists into the 
Public Art process. 

V. Artist Initiated Project: hightpole Sculptures 
Artist Scott Donahue presented his proposal to install 
sculptures on City-owned light poles at 7 locations 
through out San Francisco. The sculptures are light- 
weight plaster ears and brains, approximately 25"x lb". 
The artist's purpose is to promote the virtue of listening 
and to fill a niche in the urban landscape. The 
sculptures would be installed indefinitely, subject to 
removal at any time at tire request of tire City. The 
artist would work directly with the Department of Light 
and Power, and asked for the Arts Commission's approval of 
the aesthetics because the project, is on City property. 

The City of Emoryville has allowed the artist to install 3 
similar sculptures, and in the process the artist has 
resolved many issues regarding safety, liability and 
ownership. The artist expects to develop similar 
understandings with the City of San Francisco. 

Commissioner Healy moved to give aesthetic approval to the 
Lightpole Sculptures proposed by artist Scott Donahue for 



VAC-MINI 120. 91 -twm Page 



installation in San Francisco. Commissioner LaKocca 
seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

VI. Art Enrichment: Main Library 

Susan Pontious reported that she has been working with the 
artists to provide technical details as to how the 
proposed art will impact the architecture for the Library. 
She expects to be able to meet the December 1 deadline as 
requested by the architects. 

The Library Commission unanimously supports the direction 
which the projects are taking. There is still a concern 
about maintenance, which is now being studied. 

Representing Anne Hamilton, Anne Chamberlain presented 
models of their proposal to embed copies of pages of books 
from the library's collection into a five story diagonal 
wall. The artists are working with a New York plasterer, 
Steve Balser. The artists are studying issues of 
legibility, use of color and overall composition. A wide 
variety of literature will be incorporated, in many 
languages, both visual and verbal. The artists are 
meeting with librarians and studying the collection in 
order to make a selection of materials. Commissioners 
requested that particular attention be paid to legibility 
and to the impact of lighting. 

Nayland Blake introduced his revised proposal for the 
five-story stairwell in the Library. The wall will be 
clad in 3'x 3' panels of slate, each embedded with 9 black 
discs creating a grid of 450 points over the whole wall. 
Approximately 1/3 of the discs would house small lights 
shaded by oval mirrored glass with the names of authors 
sand-blasted onto the back. The authors' names will be 
glowing lights projecting from the dark wall. 
Additionally, the mirrored shade can be pivoted to project 
a more diffuse image of the names back onto the library 
wall. The artist was asked to continue to improve the 
legibility of the image projected onto the back wall. 

Blake is currently studying the use of colored glass, and 
will begin the process of selecting authors' names in the 
next phase. 

Susan Pontious explained the new proposal by artist Lothar 
Baumgarten which is in compliance with the Commissioner's 
request made at a previous meeting. The artist proposes 
to produce two pieces, the painted sentence "The Type is 



VAC-M1N1120 . 91-twm 



Page 



the Voice of the Printed Page" in the atrium and a graphic 
symbol on the 15 'x 9' granite wall in front of the Library 
on Grove Street. 

For his fee, the artist will submit his drawings and come 
to San Francisco to oversee the work. He would not select 
the subcontractors but would give criteria for the kind of 
artisans who would do the work. The program staff would 
locate and hire local labor. 

Commissioners requested review of design development 
drawings before proceeding to approval of the final 
proposal. Commissioner Boas moved to proceed with a 
$25,000 design development contract for the artist to 
develop two concepts, the graphic on the 15 'x 9' granite 
wall on Grove Street and the painted sentence on the 
Atrium ceiling. Commissioner Sklar seconded. It was so 
moved . 

City architect Russ Abel addressed the Committee regarding 
his concern that the Grove Street wall piece would be lost 
to view. There will be trees in front of the wall, on a 
sidewalk that is only 10' wide. The piece would be 
minimally visible from across the street, and would be 
difficult to understand walking next to it. The 
Commissioners asked that Able make the artist aware of 
these problems so that they can be addressed during design 
development . 

VII. Art Enrichment: Mental Health Facility 
Susan Pontious requested that the Committee approve the 
purchase of Emmanuel Montoya's Homage to Lydia Mendoza 
($1,500) and La Trinidad Nortena ($1,400), and Carmen 
Lomas Garza's Tamalada ($650). The pieces will be 
installed in the Mental Health Facility. Commissioner 
Healy moved to approve the purchase. Commissioner Sklar 
seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

VIII. Arts Commission Gallery 

Glen Helfand presented slides of the artists whom he is 
proposing to include in the exhibition Reai Tears which is 
scheduled for February 27 through April 10 at the Gallery. 
Commissioner Healy moved to approve the artists for the 
exhibition. Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The vote was 
unanimous . 

Anne Meissner reported that five writers will be 
participating in the Chain Reaction VII exhibit: David 



VAC-MINI 1 20 . 9 1 -twin Page 



Bonetti, Whitney Chadwick, John Ryskamp, Chiori Santiago 
and John Turner. They, in turn selected five others to 
continue the chain: J. John Priola, Susan Mable Maney, 
Jay Mayberry, Reiko Goto and David Slater. 

IX. Art Enrichment: Buyview Police Station 
Tonia Macneil presented plans for the new Bayview Police 
Station and explained the goals of the project. She 
showed slides of the 7 artists who had been chosen from a 
pool of 43 candidates by the Selection Panel for the 
Bayview Police Station. The Panel was composed of Captain 
Tom Suttmeier of the Police Department Planning Division, 
Peter Wong, Project Architect and Gail Reed, Director of 
the Bayview Opera House. 

The Committee was asked to select four or five artists to 
produce conceptual proposals for one or two sites in the 
station. The Committee unanimously selected three 
artists: John Scott, Cheryl Riley and Gordon Bryan. 
Commissioner Healy moved to approve the three artists to 
produce proposals for an amount not to exceed $500.00. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

X. Market Street 

Eleanor Beaton, who is managing the Market Street Seeding 
Projects, asked the Committee to approve the Market Street 
Advisory Panel's recommendations of artists to participate 
in the Photography Documentation and Banner Projects. 

A. Photography Documentation 

1 . Jo Babcock 

2. Susan Schwartzenberg 

3. Jim Goldberg 

4 . Brenda Praeger 

5. George Berticevich 

6. Crystal Huie 

B. Banner Series 

1 . Joe Sam 

2. Richard Armstrong 

3. James Lambertus 

4 . Chester Yoshida 

5 . Caryl Henry 

6. Enrique Chagoya 

7. Ester Hernandez 

For the Photography project, 25 images will be printed and 
installed in the Market Street kiosks. The artists will 
be paid a $2,000 fee to cover an honorarium and print 
costs. They will give the Commission 10 working prints, 



VAC-MINI 120. 91-twm 



Page 



for the archives, and the Commission will print and 
enlarge selected work. 

The 30" x 60" banners will he hung in pairs on 55 light 
poles on Market Street between 3rd and 6th Streets. Seven 
artists have been selected, and each will be shown for up 
to six months. Thus the project has been curated lor the 
next three to four years. Joe Sam will be first in the 
series, followed by James Lambertus. 

Commissioner Sklar moved to approve the recommended 
artists for the Market Street Seeding Projects. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

XI. Art Enrichment: Tenderloin Children's 

Playground 

Jill Manton explained to the Commission that the Selection 
Panel which they had previously approved was low on 
community and minority participation, and she asked for 
permission to recruit more members. The Committee agreed 
without taking a vote. 

XII. Art Enrichment: Gateway Project 

Jill Manton informed the Commissioners that Mark DiSuvero 
has agreed to produce a maquette. He was informed that 
changes in his proposal would be possible with Commission 
approval, as the design is developed. 

Debate is still going on as to which agency has final 
design approval, because the Gateway site is owned by the 
Port but leased to the Redevelopment Agency, and the Arts 
Commission has Charter-mandated responsibilities for 
approval of art. The City Attorney will rule on the issue 
and inform the Director. 

XIV. Art Enrichment: Waterfront Transportation 

Projects 

4 finalists, who had been approved previously by the 
Committee were interviewed for the Muni Metro Turnaround 
Project. The selection Panel unanimously approved artist 
Robert Millar, who has already begun work on the project. 
Susan Pontious asked the Committee to approve the panel's 
recommendation. Commissioner LaRocca moved to approve the 
selection of artist Robert Millar and to authorize the 
Director to enter into contract with the artist for an 
amount not to exceed $50,000. Commissioner Sklar 
seconded. It was so moved. 



VAC-MINI 120. 91-twm Page 



Jill Manton will make a presentation to the Port 
Commission of the Gateway, Promenade Ribbon and Historical 
Signage Projects. She requested that Commissioners make 
an effort to attend this meeting in support of the 
projects . 



XV. 




Ne' 


A. M 


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w Art Enrichment 

o East Facilities 

of the PUC and Jill Manton introduced plans 

ansit extension, bridge and Muni facilities 
and 16th Streets in Mission Bay. The Project 
be coordinated with agencies involved in the 

project. The budget for the project is about 
Three opportunities for art enrichment have 

ied : 

t rail bridge crossing China Basin Channel 

kway with two platforms next to the freeway 
acre open yard with maintenance buildings. 



An artist would be hired to work on the design team and 
would be under contract to the designers, Parsons 
Brinkerhoff. The Public Art Program would be involved 
only to conduct the artist selection process. Staff will 
be returning to the Committee with a short list of artists 
for their review. The Commissioners gave approval to 
proceed with the project. 

B. Islais Creek Muni Facilities for storage and 
maintenance of Muni coaches will be renovated and 
constructed at two sites, Islais Creek and Woods Street. 
The preliminary budget is $62.5 million. Kambiz Shandan 
of the PUC explained the projects and identified three 
possible areas for art enrichment: 

-the perimeter fences 

-wall and paving surfaces, and other treatments 
integrated into the architecture 

-the public access land next to Islais Creek itself, 
which borders the Muni facility and which will include 
various pedestrian amenities. 

The Friends of Islais Creek have produced a master plan 
for the public area, and hope to create a major parkway 
along the creek. Public Art staff will meet with that 
group to explain the public art program and understand 
their concerns. This information will be incorporated 
into the R.F.Q.s prepared for the project. 



VAC-MIN1120.91-twm 



Page 



The Public Art program will be involved in artist 
selection, to identify an artist for the design team. The 
Commission gave authorization to proceed with the project. 

XVI. Information: Save Our Outdoor Sculpture! 
Director Joanne Chow Winship reported that staff has 
assisted the Friends of Rec and Park in developing and 
submitting an application to Save Our Outdoor Sculpture, a 
project of the National Institute for the Conservation of 
Cultural Properties, for a grant of $17,000 to implement a 
survey of publicly accessible outdoor sculpture and to 
promote public awareness. 

XVII. Schedule for Policy Development and Review 

Joanne Chow Winship presented a list of areas of policy 
which need review or development. She explained that time 
needs to be set aside in the next year to study these 
issues and come to closure. The Committee asked that 
staff prioritize the list and that a special meeting be 
scheduled in January, 1992 to focus on some of the issues. 

XVIII. Market Street Seeding Project 

Jill Manton asked that the Committee vote on the fee for 
Bill Fontana's work on the Castro Theatre project. 
Commissioner Sklar moved to approve a total fee of $10,000 
for the implementation of the project by artist Bill 
Fontana. Commissioner Boas seconded. The ayes were 
unanimous . 

Jill Manton presented the completed Market Street Art 
Master Plan. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:50 p.m. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS 

1. Ordered: Approval of minutes of October 23, 
1991 Visual Arts Committee Meeting. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Approval to extend Alan Fleming's 
contract for Kezar Stadium Gates through December 31, 
1991. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN1120.91-twm Page - 8 



3« Ordered: Approval to formally deaccession two 

sculptures by Robert Irwin, Black/White Ceremonial Gates, 

Pacific/Asian port of Entry due to their irreparable 

damage and destruction as a result of the Loma Prieta 

Earthquake . 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 

Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: Aesthetic approval of Scott Donahue's 
lightpole sculptures for installation at locations 
throughout San Francisco. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Approval of a contract of $25,000 for 
artist Lothar Baumgarten to complete design development on 
two proposals, the painted sentence "The Type is the Voice 
of the Printed Page" in the atrium, and a graphic symbol 
on the exterior granite wall on Grove Street. 

Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: Approval of the purchase of Emmanuel 
Montoya's Homage to Lydia Mendoza ($1,500) and La Trinidad 
Nortena ($1,400), and Carmen Lomas Garza's Tamalada ($650) 
for the New Mental Health Facility. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: Approval of artists Margaret Crane, 
Cliff Hengst, Cary Leibowi tz/Candyass , Eric Otter, Melissa 
Polorny, Leslie Singer and Kevin Sullivan for the 
exhibition Real Tears at the Arts Commission Gallery 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 

Vote: Unanimous 

8. Ordered: Approval of artists John Scott, Cheryl 
Riley and Gordon Bryan to produce conceptual proposals for 
art work for the Bayview Police Station, for a cost not to 
exceed $500.00 each. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 

9. Ordered: Approval of artists recommended by the 
Market Street Advisory Panel for the Photography 
Documentation Project: Jo Babcock, Susan Schwartzenberg , 
Jim Goldberg, Brenda Praeger, George Berticevich, and 
Crystal Huie, for an honorarium and total implementation 



VAC-MIN1120. 91-twm Page - 9 



cost of $2,000 per artist, and for the Banner Series: Joe 
Sam, Richard Armstrong, James Lambertus, Chester Yoshida, 
Caryl Henry, Enrique Chagoya and Ester Hernandez for a 
total honorarium of $1,000 per artist. 
Moved: ('omm i ss i oner Sklar 
Vote : Unani mous 

10. Ordered: Approval of artist Robert Millar to 
work on the design team of the Muni Metro Turnaround 
Project . 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

11. Ordered: Approval of an increase in the fee for 
Bill Fontana for design and implementation of the Castro 
Theatre/Muni Project to an amount not to exceed 

$ 10 , 000 . ( Also approved at Visual Art Committee meeting of 

October 23, 1991 ) 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vote: Unanimous 



Submitted : 



muxj nousm 




Tonia Macneil 

Curator, Public Art Program 



Approved : 




Joa(i/e Chow Winslfip 
Director of Cultrual Affairs 

n,t. wi //htrfa/ 



VAC-MINI 120. 91-twm 



Page 



Ml 



STAFF REPORT: LIBRARY 
DATE: 11/7/91 

TO: VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
FROM: SUSAN PONTIOUS 
RE: LOTH Alt BAUMGARTEN PROPOSAL FOR MAIN LIBRARY 



Background : 

In July, 1991, the Artist presented a revised proposal for 
the $85,000 fee the Commission was willing to offer him. 
This was a painted sentence, " 77ie Type is the Voice of the 
Printed Page", painted on the suspended ceiling above the 
Atrium, and requested an additional $10,000 for travel 
expenses . 

The proposal was originally approved, but then removed from 
the consent calendar at the Commission meeting and 
considered again at the August VAC meeting. Cathy Simon, 
from SMWM attended that meeting and spoke to the issue. 

It was the general consensus, that the sentence, isolated 
from the artist's original proposals for graphic images 
related to type and book making, was not as powerful as some 
of his earlier ideas. 

The Committee agreed to offer the artist $85,000 plus 
$10,000 travel for one to three of his original designs 
submitted in Feb., 1991. These included proposals for the 
floor, and a graphic image for the Grove St. entrance 
(originally proposed for glass, but which could be 
translated onto a granite slab). 

New Proposal : 

On Oct. 28th, the artist met with Jim Freed and .Jennifer 
Sage to discuss the possibilities. The architects strongly 
encouraged him to consider a floor piece. 

Marian Goodman communicated to me that the artist decided 
that a floor piece was too much work for the money, and he 
now proposes the following two pieces: 1) a graphic piece on 
the 15' x 9' granite slab at the Grove St. Entrance; 2) his 
painted sentence on the atrium ceiling. 

Attachments : 

1. Minutes from Augusl VAC meeting relating to 
Baumgarten proposal 

2. Sept.. 9fh letter from S. Petitions to L. 
Baumgarten 




nclsco. CA 94102 
a 9671 
.21 3868 



Sept. 9, L991 

liOthar Baumgarten 
Sittarderstrasse : 
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Germany 

Dear Lot liar ; 



1ISSIONERS 
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.-554-9677 

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> Grove Street 
5-5^4-9682 

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Last, month, I presented the Visual Arts Committee with 
your proposal to paint, the sentence '"type is the Voice 
of the Printed Page" in the atrium area of the suspended 
reading room. I also presenter! your- request tor an 
additional $10,000 for travel and per diem. 

The Committee approved the additional $10,000, (which I 
communicated to Marian Goodman), but has subsequently 
expressed strong reservations about the project proposal 

itsel f . 

T met with the project architects to get their views on 
the proposal, and the matter was discussed again at the 
Visual Arts Committee meeting on August 28th. It was 
the general consensus that the painted sentence 
proposal, isolated from your graphic images related to 
type and book making, was not as powerful as some of 
your other ideas. The Committee and the project 
architects expressed the hope that you would reconsider 
addressing one or more of your former proposals instead. 
I have enclosed photocopies of these proposals for your 
re f erence . 

They i nc 1 ude : 

1. 2 alternate proposals for the floor. 

2. The proposal for the Grove St. entrance. The 
architects have said that there is now a 15' x 30' 
dark granite slab at that entrance where they think 
this graphic would look very handsome. 

The architects and I are eager to discuss these 
possibilities further; please give us a call at your 
earliest convenience. 

The Arts Commission's fee offer remains at $85,000 plus 
the additional $10,000 for travel and per diem. 



Sincerely 



J* 




Susan Pohtious 
Curator 



§31$ 



Marian Goodman 



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in l.l Ii 1 I. li MIS, 

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public Ik a i- i ng with i In Mo scorn, artists. : In explained 
t I,., i t lie Civic Des i gn Cumin i t t e. won 1 d i\ \ i e\. the proposal 
,, l a spec i a I mei: t i tig on 1-V i day , in gust 3D, 1 '.I'.i I and I lie i r 
i , ,ii . i .- rn ■-, wo ill d In passed on in .. 1 e t I e i to I he artists 

,i .,,., i. i I li a description ..I I iie Majm line roaehment and 111; 
I . I-, . , i ■-.-.. tna.jo i , i .in -. ru l . . tin.' Co mini ss l on i : . tin. amount 

,,l st.afl lime and a\ ai I ab i 1 i. t.y of landing necessary to go 
Un',,i^li .in env i i 'on men f a J re v i ew . I lu artista shoul d be 
made aware of the i i iik , mono; and a in: cess I'arlurs 
, , ... , i a fed willi t In i i proposal in order I'^i- t hem to make a 
decision as lu whether to move forward with I he project. 
II,, i i.iiin, . I i , . .i ked that fh. Manfoii's leltei offer the 

ii- List. s I li.- oppoi-l an i l \ I . ■ make a new proposal , should 
lhe\ dei ide not to centrum with fin current orn . 



I he tin el i ng was ud.jou rued a I K 



p. m, 



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STAFF REPORT: MENTAL HEALTH FACILITY 

DATE: 11/7/91 

TO: VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

FROM: SUSAN PONTIOUS 

RE: APPROVAL OF PURCHASE OF WORKS BY EMMANUEL MONTOYA 
AND CARMEN LOMAS GAIi/.A 

r n April, 1991, The Visual Arts Committee reviewed and 
approved the purchase of works by Emmanuel Montoya [Homage 
to Lydia Mendoza, $1,500, and La Tinidad Nortena, §1,400) 
and Carmen Lomas Garza [Tamalada, $650) pending review and 
approval of the client's clinical review committee. 

However, the mental health department, is in total disarray, 
due to large layoffs and reorganization, and the project 
manager, Phyllis Harding, has been unable to identify an 
appropriate committee. 

Meanwhile, the artists have been holding the work pending 
our final commitment, but understandably are getting 
res 1 1 ess . 

In light of this, Phyllis Harding requests that the 
Committee approve the purchase of the work now. If, at a 
later date, it should be determined that the work is 
inappropriate for patient areas, it can be hung in the 
administrative offices we have identified to receive 
artwork . 



3£ 



November 5, 1991 

STAFF REPORT 

TO: Commissioners, Visual Arts Committee 
FROM: Debra Lehane 

RE: Save Outdoor Sculpture Coordinating Organization 
Appl i cation 

The National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural 
Property, the National Museum of American Art and the 
Smithsonian Institution are initiating a project called SOS 
(Save Outdoor Sculpture). It is a national survey to 
inventory sculpture in the outdoor environment which is 
publicly accessible. The project is designed to be 
performed by local agencies and collaborations are 
encouraged. We have been invited to apply. As a 
Coordinating Organization, we would be expected to develop a 
core of volunteers who complete surveys provided by the NIC. 
The surveys are then returned to the NIC for entry in a data 
base system. The second goal of the SOS project is to 
increase public awareness about the importance of caring for 
outdoor sculpture. To help defray the cost of implementing 
the surveys and awareness program, modest awards are being 
offered to the coordinating organization. Seventeen 
thousand dollars ($17,000) has been awarded for San 
Francisco. The Friends of the Recreation and Park 
Department have agreed to work with us in a collaborative 
effort on this project and to act as fiscal agent. I have 
recommended that we participate for the following reasons: 

-the Arts Commission is in the best position to successfully 

execute the survey and has the most to gain 
-we participated in the pilot study in 1989 and have a head 

start on creating the inventory list 
-it would correspond with our efforts to computerize the 

collection and provide much needed assistance with the 

inventory. We are mandated to perform inventories of the 

col lect ion . 
-it would provide assessments for establishing future 

conservation priorities 
-it would provide a means to generate more public interest 

in saving our outdoor statues and possibly help to build an 

endowment fund for maintenance 
-it is a highly visible program and provides for good public 

relations 
-it brings us local, state and national attention and 

recognition 

The Friends have agreed to participate since the Parks will 
also benefit from the efforts to raise public awareness. 
The parks are home to many of our outdoor sculptures and 
for years we have been trying to Find a way to raise funds 
for the pieces located in the parks. 



The Project will be divided into two Phases. Phase one will 
be handled by the Arts Commission. Phase one consists of 
recruiting volunteers and performing the actually survey. 
The Conservation Lab at the Fine Arts Museums has agreed to 
assist with the required training sessions for volunteers. 
Volunteers would be solicited from local graduate programs 
in the arts and museum sciences, through the museums docent 
programs and the Friends of Rec/Park. Staff would be hired 
through the $17,000 award for the project to assist with the 
Arts Commission's responsibilities. I would supervise the 
Project Coordinator for the Arts Commission. His/Her 
responsibilities would be: 

-Recruit volunteers and trainers 

-Set agendas, schedules, syllabus 

-Hold training sessions for volunteers 

-Evaluate volunteers 

-Organize field supplies and materials 

-Define zones in city and make volunteer assignments 

-Perform site visits, review completed surveys 

-Act as volunteer liaison, answering questions 

-Fill in for drop outs 

-Prepare narrative reports of survey progress 

I will work closely with the Coordinator in guiding the 
project. I would guess that we are dealing with 
approximately 250 works which fall into the definition of 
outdoor sculpture as defined by the NIC. Molly and I have 
estimated that the project will take about 8 months which 
includes start up organization and actually survey 
completion. We can either begin in February or August of 
1992. The (1IC has allowed for two years to complete the 
project. 

Phase II of the project involves the Public Outreach 
requirement of the project. The Friends of the Recreation 
and Park Department will serve as our 501c3 non profit 
fiscal agent. They will assume responsibility for planning 
and implementing the public awareness program. This will 
aid them in getting financial support for the conservation 
of the statuary in the parks system. Since a large majority 
of our monuments and statues are in the parks, this will be 
of great benefit to them. This phase of the project can be 
used to create a brochure explaining our program and the 
Arts Commissions role, as a fund raising event and as a kick 
off for an adopt a monument in the park campaign. 

We will be notified in January if our proposal is accepted. 



exhibition proposal 



REAL TEAKS 

Curnted by Glen Helfand 



San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery 
February 27 - April 10, 1992 



work by: 

Margaret Crane 

Cliff Hengst 

Cary Leibowitz/Candyass 

Eric Otter 

Melissa Pokorny 

Leslie Singer 

Kevin Sullivan 



CURATORIAL STATEMENT 

With die passing of the cold war into the flux of heated global political (and 
environmental) climates, the cool, inflated art world, as defined in the 1980's, is beginning 
melt. As glitzy art dealers who embodied the glamour of the decade are indicted for 
shady dealings, collectors are faced with less certain investments, and artists are butting 
against increasingly insidious Right Wing attacks on the freedom of expression. The song 
does not remain the same. 

Real Tears is a group show which subjectively begins to illuminate the emergence of 
a post-Eighties sensibility— one which mixes a developed sense of irony with increasing 
dashes of compassion— which reflects a world which has become inescapably more "real." 
If the much of the work of the last decade is described as opaque (conceptually surface- 
oriented, slippery slick, conceivably untouched by human hands), the art in Real Tears is 
semi-permeable. 

The artmaking strategy of appropriating images and/or objects to comment upon 
the society from which they stem is perhaps the clearest example of the cool, ironic tone of 
80's art. For this show evolving uses of appropriation will function as a barometer of 
change. The artists I've selected do not completely forgo the slick, popular appeal of, say, 
Jeff Koons' "Michael Jackson and Bubbles," but they also manage to inject a more human, 
artistic presence into what appears to be very impersonal, corporate-influenced, mediated 
subjects and manufactured materials. This frequently enters into the realm of cultural 
iconography which identifies the individual as well as the group from which the artist 
emerges. 

I'm including artists who deal with pop cultute from a more individualized, 
frequently humorous viewpoint where the materials cost less and the quotation matks are 
beginning to quiver. The seven artists represent a generation who have fully digested the 
notion of post modernism. Their art can also be seen as a descendent and/or response to 
strategies such as image/text, unaltered appropriation, art about art, et al, which are 
rapidly becoming the cold old guard. 

Beneath the art jargon, however, the ultimate goal of Real Tears is to restore a sense 
of humor and accessibility to a forum which seems to have drifted into the realm of in- 
jokes and encyclopedic referencing, and to find a ground where a healthy sense of cultural 
cynicism can still be politically and personally empowering. 



DETAIL 

The show will include varying quantities of work in various media(selected by the curator) 
by each of the artists. The majority of the work has already been selected, although, as 
many of the studio visits were made some time ago, I plan to select additional recent 
work approximately one month prior to the exhibition. The installation will also include 
wall-mounted excerpts from published texts relating to issues raised in the show. 

A short catalog to include an exhibition essay by the curator, photographs of work, artists 
bios, and a relating creative text work will be published in conjunction with the exhibition. 
All catalog material will be submitted for approval before reaching the design stage. 



Aimsrs i)i;s< iiirrioivs 

Margaret Crane works wiili text, both found and self-generated, to probe the 
dysfunctionality of contemporary life. Mirroring a commercial form of writing, Crane 
will create a museum-style audio tour which will survey and contextualize the works in the 
show from a feverishly subjective viewpoint— placing the role of the "expett" in a 
compromising position while providing insights which are disallowed in conventional 
arenas. A written transcript will also be available. 

Cliff Hengst creates pseudo (self) portraits by compiling highly selective lists of 
periodicals, song titles, celebrities, and victims. These are hand written, categorized and 
linked via low-tech craft means. Updating an image/text strategy, Hengst subverts slick, 
typeset appearances, while creating personally revealing sculptural objects. 

Cary Leibowitz/Candyass posits the artist/individual as downtrodden loser in search of a 
golden dream. His combination of photographic self-images, manufactured elements and 
handwritten scrawl magnify the frequently sub-iexted neurotic, self-doubting, attention- 
hungry intention behind a society obsessed with personal notoriety. These pieces, while 
often manufactured, have a cheap, giveaway quality that is a refreshing anti-thesis of 
refrigerated, vitrined preciousness. Leibowitz will be teaching at the SF Art Institute in 
January 1992. 

Eric Otter sculpturally combines his sincere environmental concerns with beer-guzzling 
rock and roll, car culture, and children's toys in ways that are both amusing and affecting. 
For example, "Dead Pan," is a sad, smart alecky vision of little stuffed animal dolphins 
floating in a sea of used motor oil or the names of death-oriented heavy metal bands 
spelled out in sea creature-killing plastic six pack rings. 

Melissa Pokorny uses furniture and objects to create simultaneously homey and repulsive 
pseudo-narratives. Mining an overlooked, high-1960's strata of thrift store refuse, her 
sculptures operate on levels that dig beneath campy pop references to find, via an updated 
surrealist stance, a more evocative layer of collective experience. 

Leslie Singer addresses, and undermines the aforementioned notion of the opaque. Her 
deceptively simple crayon drawings of celebrities ultimately turn into a minimalist void, 
where the seemingly tangible media figure becomes increasingly harder to comprehend. 
Actress Karen Black, roughly, humanly rendered in black, on a black ground, becomes 
literally a black hole where the viewer must work to get inside (or outside) of. The role of 
the fan, be it of art or film stars, is thrown into question, as the viewer's face is more easily 
seen in the reflective glass surfaces. 

Kevin Sullivan paints in oil a series of large-scale album covers, similar to those used for 
advertising outside of record stores— only in this case, the almost universally-recognizable 
images have gone through very recognizable use; they are frayed, stained and doodled 
upon. The covers become inflated, emblematic scenarios with which we can all relate, ie: 
The Beatles' "White Album with Kool-Aid Stain" or "Black Sabbath and Candle Wax". 



glen helfand 



1186 Folsom St, San Francisco, CA 94103 Phone: 41 5/621-4318 TAX: 41 5/626-1 



r 



T». 1/2/61 
education 

8. A. - Art, Emphasis in Conceptual Design, San Francisco State University, January 1984 

curatorial experience 

What's Wrong With This Picture? Artists Respond to Censorship 

San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, September 22 - October 28, 1989 
Nightmare on Valencia Street III, Intersection for the Arts, San Francisco, October 1988 

misc. curatorial experience 

Member of advisory board, San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, term: 1989 - 1992 

Member of Artists Committee, San Francisco Art Institute, term: 1991-1994 

Screening committee, 15th International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, San Francisco, Spring 1991 

Member of curatorial board, LAB Gallery, San Francisco, 1990 season 

exhibitions 

The Rock Show, Southern Exposure Gallery, San Francisco, CA, October 1991 
Muste d'honneur miniscule, New Langton Arts, San Francisco, CA, September 1990 
Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves, Works, San Jose CA December 1987. 

Nightmare On Valencia Street II, w/ Marsha Vdovin, Intersection, San Francisco, CA, October 1987 
Nightmare On Valencia Street, October 1986 
Restaurant Show, Gallery 3735, San Francisco CA, September 1985 
Food and Crime, San Francisco, CA July, 1984 
Important Resarch, Phone Booth Gallery, SFSU, December 1983 
ost-Science Fair, Central YMCA, San Francisco, CA, September 1983 



writing 

selected list of publications, in chronological order 

SF, San Francisco, California 

Art Issues, Los Angeles, California 

SF Weekly, San Francisco, California, April 1989 - present, contributing writer, weekly "critic's choice" 

Shift, San Francisco, California 

Visions, Los Angeles, California 

Frameline, San Francisco, California 

program notes for 15th International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, June 1991 
The Advocate, Los Angeles, California 
The Nose, San Francisco, CA 
The City, San Francisco, California 
New Art Examiner, Chicago, Illinois 

Artweek, San Jose, California, 1988-4/91 Contributing Editor 
EXPOSURE, Los Angeles, California 
Vox, San Francisco, CA 

Ipso Facto, San Francisco, CA, Associate Editor (issue #7) 
Art Coast, Los Angeles, CA 
San Francisco Sentinel, November 1986 - August 1988, Staff Art Critic 

misc 

House of Forks (a play by Kevin Killian), actor, The Lab, San Francisco, September, 1991 
Coal Miner's Granddaughter (videotape by Cecilia Dougherty), actor, 1990-91 

^•"utwrite '91, Art and Writing panel, moderator, San Francisco, March, 1991 

l» ^og House, guest critic, February 1991 



CLIFFORD IIENGST 

3536-A 23rd Street 

San Francisco. CA 94110 

(415)821-6176 

Education SAN FRANCISCO ART INSTITUTE 

Bachelor of Fine Arts, Spring 1991 
Majored in New Genre/Performance 

EXHIBITIONS 

Aid de Camp, Emcee, Benefit, DNA Lounge, San Francisco, 
October, 1991 

Anticipation, Performance, Benefit, Cafe Du Nord, 
San Francisco, August 1991 

Performance, A Different Light Bookstore, San Francisco 

August 1991 
Performance, Group Show, Southern Exposure Gallery, 

San Francisco, September 1991 

Buying the Magazine for the Ads, Group Show, Terrain Gallery, 
August 1991 

Solo Show, Anti-Matter Gallery, San Francisco, 

July/August 1991 

Against the Grain, Group Show, Anti-Matter Gallery, 
San Francisco, June/July 1991 

Situation, Group Show, New Langton Arts, June/July 1991 

15th Annual San Francisco Gay & Lesbian Film Festival, 
June 1991 
(Sex .I_s Show) Video: "My Sorrows Mean Nothing to You" 

Installation, San Francisco Art Institute, Cafe, May 1991 

Liquid Eyeliner, San Francisco, Summer 1990 

Solo Show, A Different Light Bookstore, San Francisco 
August 1989 

Art Against Aids Show, San Francisco, May 1989 

Gay and Lesbian Student Show, San Francisco Art Institute, 

March 1989 

Student. Cafe Shows: Sept, '87, Sept. '89, Feb. '90 

Valentines Day Show , Diego Rivera Gallery, Feb. 1988 



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JEAN- PAUL CAllLTIfR 
JOAN VA.S^ ■« 
COMIC PES GARfONS 
MATSUPA 
CHRISTIAN LAfRflX 
BETSEy JOHNSON 

PERRy ELLIS 

CHANEL 

ROMEO GIGLI 
>VES- SAINT LAURENT 
VIVIfNNE WfSTVDOP 

MARC JACOBS 
GIORGIO Ji SWTT'itJGELO -'!* 
KATHERINE HAM f IT.."! '' 

ANORE WALKER 
VOHJI XAMAMOTO 

MARTINE SITBON 

THIERRy MU&ER 
TOPD OLDHAM 

CALMN KLEIN 
RALPH LAUREN 

ANNA SUI 

KARL LAGERFELP 

PAUL SMITH 
APRIANNE VITTADINl"" 

SYBILLA 
CLAUPE MONTANA 

fuCKTUN fRANOS ROTH 



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i 




EORD HENGST Redemption, 1991 



JOHN-ERIC OTTER 



Born: Baltimore, Maryland, 196f 



EDUCATION: 
1988-present 
1986-7 
1986 

SOLO EXHIBITIONS: 



San Francisco Art 'institute, Is? ; CA : 

Antioch College ," Yellow Springs ,. Ohio 

California' College ;.of thS'-A'tts and'jCrafts, 
Oakland, CA . ' V ■ : >■ ;. r '.. •' ''■'■' 



24 Feb -3 Mar 1990 "Selected Painfcihd/s wibn ! Sound, K SFAl Cafe, 
San Francisco; Art Ihsfcifcdte ,; SF, CA 



28 July 1989 

3 Mar -7 Apr 1987 

GROUP EXHIBITIONS 
15 May 1990 

14 May 1990 

7 May 1990 

6-20 May 1990 
27 Apr 1990 



"Angel Express, ''*t$G ; Series^ ;Ar't'ist}s .Television 
Access, SF, CA '.^:ii ;£ ', .; ..',.". ;j ; •' ' ' ',;4;' - " '' : i.\ 

"A Place to Breathe, '^ANGSfMUSBUM, Yellow 
Springs , Ohio- ; v i \ 



New American Makers ,' video, show curated by Sharon 
Grace, Opera Plaza Cinema, Sp", ; cA , : ' : ,. ■: ' 

"UAL 173:Domestic Disaster, " : Black Box Productions, 
The Marsh performance Series, Morty's Club, SF, CA 

"UAL 173 iDomestic' Disaster , h Black 'Box Productions 
The Marsh performance seriefe; Morty's Club, SF,CA 

"Spring Show," San Francisco .Art Ihstitute, SF,CA 



"James Brown Performance Evening, ''Artspace Annex, 
SF, CA "■: ;v J »...;:•. ;-..'J , 

"James Brown Video," Limbo,' SF, CA 



17 Apr -3 Jun 1990 "James Brown/Leona Helmsley," group show of 
the Installation class in collaboration with 
George Kuchar's film class of the San Francis- 
co Art Institute, Artspace Annex, SF, CA 



page' 2 

■ r ; 

I 
JOHN-ERIC OTTER 







GROUP EXHIBITIONS ( cont .) : '. :, i '•■ • ■ ' .• .,'i "'' . , • 'V'.-!:^ ,^;>V .JU^i 

3-29 Apr 1990 "Street, Life," *a ; CUfat6d', ; 6hdW'vb!t: : Jingle y channel 
worKs from the Video Departniejte;! b;f '-SFAt'Ug^O 1 , 
Musee d'hohneur Miniscuie',£N6v; : Lahgtbni Arts, 1 SF,CA 

.. :;■■: : i %;'-., . V • >:*; J* Y\V I'V'i'-^ } ;?i !■ ! ' ' 
1 Apr 1990 -Rope Piede/We Are the .WdVid'^I (Cafe s Club. 1 Series , 



1 Dec 1989 



A Different Light. (Bookstore JoSF'^'dAii'' W '■ 

"UAL -173 :bomestid';;6iiastej^ $3$*$H?BbXf! productions , 
Short On AtfcitUd^isptirig'J^ei'ieslt'^E'^ CA-- %M\, '■' 

" INNIES' •>: JOtiTTiES]/ jg 'ArbliklJfipelfeVjy lonpAccess ,SF , 

;■•"' I •' V * ^ - '-WMv. .IK! 'k. !■ , . 

"Sad Doughnuts ibMf tf/^la^^W-Kb^bb'i'Alr^ institute , 
SF/V(iA,iic\irated';i;D^fAifend^*e1id|?idksr'r Mi |:j [ /:! 

SILENTJ- KNIGHTS ;!rah',eyenirfg?l6f;;si lent performance 
o benef it' ' ACT+UP^ jVlArti&ts ('Television 'Access , SF , 

A •''■■ v : \':i t. -V :tK"''L.,;K$ ■'■" : -M, ..ijLrr ,. [".i r- ■ > .f 



20 Mar 1990 



10-17 Dec 1969 



to 
CA 



10 Oct 1989 "pile Piece, 11 Short : '0n'. : Attitude;! fall Series,: SF,CA 

;■.■(< '•'•'■ ' ■'■'■ ''■ ■ :- : l -•* r> t'.'i ■:•■ 1 ' ' * " . i I ' 

11 Apr 1989 "Rock Pieced" Short' Oh 'Attitude sprin'gi series ,SF, 

CA, in- Collaboratribrt'i'.yith ;Lynh fpyani ;: i-r '. |' 

3-12:Feb 1989 , "lntroducti'ond'«^8Vi;t : ''H*i:itet jjStrieetViijfr'oin^Cas'tro 
to the Embarcadero, 'SF>CA ;>: {'■..: i.! '.;'.'.•;••' , ! . 
' ' .',■,-"--.-■■•'• ' ■' K'p'-^: "-j,: ■ t'-./;i-- ^ v.;v''»' \i ' : f ; 'j ;' l!,: ; 
29-30 Jan 1989 "Death: #13)^ ,Cravispace;' behind": Men v s' bathroom, 
.;..,. San FrdhCiaco Attfctrtatit'titeHiSP'icai^; ; ; , 

■ '■ rii . '■".>•••. • .. ,■ • ' r ; -■.-^•;jS- ; i:=-:.T:ii ■ -:.-v .; ?"-:']/*? ^-? v-' .',-n"^' a •« : 4^?i-* i! ^.rif : - : : =-?* • ; *-■ ' "' i 

25 Jan 1989 "The' Hanged 'Man!^;#i2,"' Studio\ I0i' San Francisco 
"■ Art Institute, iSF,CA ;, f<i ' ' , I : -i ; : - '-' , :,' - ',% \' t \ I I 

19-21 July 19,88 "Transflux Theme^ark,'"-' Artists /Television* Access , 
SF,-CA ■ ■!•■ ■ ::'<j : :;/' / '" J;; 4; : r , /-;.;^. «M'» ; 

28 July - 21 Aug 1988 "The Frisco 100! ,'■ Alligator 'Galldry and 
Performance Space, SFt CA '"-V.'. i ' 

3-18 May 1988 "Spring Show," Sari Franci§cp!;.Art institute, 'SF,CA 

VIDEO SCREENINGS --PUBLIC BROADCAST: . . ; - ' ' 

Madeline's Variety H6ur/MVTV> cable Access 25, SF, 
CA, group screening , . • 






VIDEO SCREENINGS --PUBLIC BROADCAST* (coht'? | :' ; .. . • ?;; ! ; ' :.'V: , i 

•■■..■ ■■'■: ■' f&W'MVi M 

Hot Box; ATA Screens..., Cable -Accesitf 25 c 



CA/ solo screening 



"Bar Video," LaRocca's Bat, o SF,' CA, group 
screening . t!".; fj : :;•' '.Ij . j 

Nashville Cable Access ■ . 



SF, 



PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE! 



1990 



1989 



1986-8 



Co-Director, Diego Rivera i Gallery ,.,'San Francisco 
Art Institute, SF, CA, ' (with Nartci -Rahn) j . 



founder/director, Black Box" Prodtititiofis : ? < 

volunteer/gallery itsst. , Bo-^Bo! s'; SF,v ; ' CA - ! ( ■ ■'< ' '■ 

volunteer , Footwork-, SF,. CA ; {.■■ \\ hi;. :. , : ti';-, 

Asstl to Clarence Maybeer'Video for- S"A Reading 
for Cassette-Deck Speake'r-i-Cha'ir and "Monitor , " 
A Different Light Bookstore^ .SF^CAY 

co-founder/cd^-director, ANGSTMUSEUM, Yellow 
Springs, Ohio, (with Lynn- Dyan) 



BIBLIOGRAPHY: 



Atkins, Robert. "A Day Without ArtV" Arts , May 
1990, pg. 62 with color reproduction. 



'SFAI/PV,'.' Shift Magazine, #7,; (video',) 17:30 min. 



CARY S. LEIBOWITZ / CANDYASS 

BORN 1963 

EDUCATION 

1981-83 The Pratt Institute, New York, NY 

1983-84 Fashion Institute Of Technology, New York, NY 

1984-87 University Of Kansas, B.F.A. 

ONE PERSON EXHIBITIONS 

1991 Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica, CA 
Galerie Krinzinger, Vienna, Austria 

1990 Stux Gallery, New York, NY 

ID Galerie, Dusseldorf, West Germany 
Galerie Antoine Candau, Paris, France 



Stux Gallery, New York, NY 
Real Art Ways, Hartford, CT 

Hampden Gallery, University Of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, MA 



GROUP EXHIBITIONS 

1991 "Awards in the Visual Arts 1990-1991 Recipients," 
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 
Washington, D.C., Albuquerque Museum of Art, 
Albuquerque, NM, Toledo Museum of Art, 
Toledo, OH, The BMW Gallery, New York, NY 

"A New Low," Claudio Botello Gallery, Turino, 
Italy. Curated by Collins and Milazzo. 

"Outside America: Going into the 90's," Fay Gold 
Gallery, Atlanta, GA. Curated by 
Collins and Milazzo. 
1990 '^Stuttering, " Stux Gallery, New York, NY 

"U.S.A. Annees, 90," Galerie Antoine Candau, 
1 ' Espace-Dieu, Paris, France 

"Meditations on AIDS," The Space, Boston, MA 

"Ober Flachliche Ideen," ID Galerie, Dusseldorf, 
Germany 

"The Charade of Mastery Deciphering Modernism in 
Contemporary Art," The Whitney Museum of 
American Art, Downtown at Federal Reserve 
Plaza, New York, NY 

Shoshana Wayne, Santa Monica, CA 

"Camera Culture: Curriculum Vitae," Thomas Segal 
Gallery, Boston, MA 

"The Exotic Image: Modern Masters and Mistresses," 
Bennett Si<£a£c£ ff|^Jry , New York, NY 



w 



f 



"Flower," Russell Sage College Art Gallery, 
Troy, New York 



ID Gallery, Dusseldorf, West Germany 

'Antoine Candau, Paris France 

"The Last Laugh," Massimo Audiello Gallery, 

New York, NY, curated by Collins and Milazzo 
"Summer Review" Stux Gallery, New York 

1989 Deichtorhallen Museum, Hamburg, West Germany, 

curated by Harald Szeeman 
"The Second Second," Althea Viafora Gallery, New 

York, NY, curated by Bill Arning 
"Trouble in Paradise," List Visual Arts Center, 

MIT, Cambridge, MA, curated by Dana Friis 

Hanson 
Stux Gallery, New York, NY 
Antoine Candau, Paris, France 

1988 "Boston Now," Institute Of Contemporary Art, 
Boston, MA 
Hallwalls, Buffalo, NY 



AWARDS 

1990-1991 Award in the Visual Arts 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Aletti, Vince. "The Schlemiel of Soho," VILLAGE VOICE, 

October 9, 1990. 
Als, Hilton. "Cary Leibowitz/CANDYASS, " ARTFORUM, December 

1989. p. 143 
"Cary's Chart The rising sign but also the ascendant," 

(catalogue essay) , in U Can't Be Dead All the 

Time (Paris: Editions Antoine Candau, 1990). 
Bonetti, David. "Paper Prophets," BOSTON PHOENIX, July 1st, 

1988, Section 5, pp. 3-4 (illustration) 
"Faces To Watch," BOSTON GLOBE, April 8, 1990. 

"I Love You More Than Cary Leibowitz," 

(catalogue essay) , in U Can't Be Dead All the 

Time (Paris: Editions Antoine Candau, 1990) . 
BOTTOM LINE PERSONAL, "Two hot new artists," February 15, 

1991, p. 12. 
Cameron, Dan. "The Sexual is Cultural," ART & AUCTION 

(critical edge), December 1990. 
Collins & Milazzo. "From Kant to Kitsch and Back Again". 

TEMA CELESTE, January-February 1991, pp 76-80. 

Catalogue Essay: "Outside America", 1991 

Fay Gold Gallery. 

"CandyAss/Cary Leibowitz: Picture This" 

(catalogue essay) , in U Can't Be Dead All the 



Time (Paris: Editions Antoine Candau, 1990) . 

"The Last Decade American Artists of the 80's," 

Tony Shafrazi Gallery, September 25-October 27, 

1990. 

"Sinking to the Bottom of Discourse. Rene 

Ricard," TEMA CELESTE, July-October, 1990. 
Cottingham", Laura. "Negociating Masculinity and 

Representation," CONTEMPORANEA, December 1990. 
Framcke, Ricarda. "Labyrinth der Moderne," HAMBURGER 

ABENDBLATT, November 10, 1989. 
Friis-Hansen, Dana. "Cary S. Leibowitz and the American 

Dream," (catalogue essay), in U Can't Be Dead All the 
Time (Paris: Editions Antoine Candau, 1990) . 
Gaipied, "Y'a de l'art dans l'air," 28 Juin 1990 
Hirsh, David. "Signs of Chaos," NEW YORK NATIVE, October 2, 

1989, p. 41 
Hofmann, Isabelle. "Keine Angst vor grosse Raumen" 

SONNABEND, November 4, 1989, p. 47 
Humphrey, David. "New York/ Gilbert&George, Larry Clark, 

Pruitt & Early, Cary S. Leibowitz/Candyass, 

"American Artists of the 80's," ART ISSUES, 

January 1991, pp 4-5. 
Jocks, Heinz-Norbert. "Zwanghaft unburgerlich, " WESTDEUTSCHE 

ZEITUNG, June 6, 1990. 
Jocks-Mrosek, Von Sabine. "Bilder an Wascheklammern, " NEVE 

RHEINZEITUNG, May 24, 1990, (illustration) 
Johnson, Ken. "Cary S. Leibowitz/Candyass at Stux," ART IN 

AMERICA, November 1990. 
Keedle, Jayne. "Just When You Thought It Was Safe To Go Back 

In A Gallery," THE HARTFORD ADVOCATE, February 26, 

1990. 
Knight, Christopher. "Leibowitz Seeks Success Through 

Failure" LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 16, 1991 
Mahoney, Robert. "Cary Leibowitz," ARTS, December 1990. 
"All Quiet on the Western Front, Espace Dieu," 

CONTEMPORANEA, January 1991, pp. 105-6. 
Miller, John. "Candyass," ARTFORUM, December 1990. 
Muniz, Vik. "Vorbereitung Zur Naturlichen Nihil Negativo (or 
the libidinal, metaphysics of Cary S. Leibowitz 
work)," (catalogue essay), in U Can't Be Dead All the 
Time (Paris: Editions Antoine Candau, 1990) . 
Nalley, Jon. "Sugar Buns," OUTWEEK, September 24, 1989, p50 

"Of Fried Pork Chops And Gay Porn," METROLINE, 

February 9, 1990. 
Piatt, Ron. "Cary Darling Ron Piatt stlaks the elusive and 

oh so dandy Candyass," (catalogue essay), in U 

Can't Be Dead All the Time (Paris: Editions 

Antoine Candau, 1990) . 
Pruitt-Early . "The Only Game in Town," (catalogue essay), in 

U Can't Be Dead All the Time (Paris: Editions 

Antoine Candau, 1990) . 
Quentel, Holt. "Errata," (catalogue essay), in U Can't Be 

Dead All the Time (Paris: Editions Antoine Candau, 

1990) . 
Roulette, Todd. "Dear CSL/Candyass" THING, Spring 1991 
Rugoff, Ralph. "Sweet Candyass' Sad-Sack Song, Cary 

Leibowitz's aesthetic of the pathetic" LA WEEKLY, 



r 



April 26/May 2, 1991 
Schwendenwien, Jude. "Trouble in Paradise, The Art Gallery, 

University of Maryland," CONTEMPORANEA, December 

1990, p. 103. 
Stapen, Nancy. "Boston Now," BOSTON HERALD, June 26, 1988, 

Section 5, p. 3 
Starger, Steve. "Leibowitz: Homosexuality And Artistry Are 

Connected," JOURNAL ENQUIRER, March 8, 1990. 
Temin, Christine. THE BOSTON GLOBE, June 1988 

THE NEW YORK OBSERVER, "Uncensored, " October 2, 

1989, p. 3 
Thrush, Glenn. "Wherefore Art Now The Decade Finds 

Direction Following Five New Stars, DOWNTOWN 

EXPRESS, January 16, 1991, p. 3. 
Vieland, Eric. "Oui-Usines Occupees," (catalogue essay), in 

U Can't Be Dead All the Time (Paris: Editions 

Antoine Candau, 1990) . 
Wood, Joe, editor. "Choices-Cary Leibowitz/Candyass, " 

VILLAGE VOICE, October 2, 1990. 



U WEEKLY 



1 1 u * i»iiiii iss sfimc mm hew iou icon 

' f l M Wl I » ,1111 f A I J I 2 / 2 I » . 2 2 4 J 



ATRIL26-MAYZ.I991UW1IIIY 



r 



Sweet Candyass' Sad-Sack Song 

Cory Leiboivilz's aesthetic of the pathetic 



BT RALPH RUCOff 




Ci.jSll. Hi-,!, I 

DiitNoirGvrrJbg 




Salle. RiiIkti Lung ill |nlin llc.skuvicll — 

would appairully radirr Ik-' lilm dim l.ns. Anil 
wl.>- ..«.t> h.be. cincrraingly evident dial 

origin, mils up looking like nrtisciuc.il. 

Dwarfed l.y duplies ul mass-media imagery 
mill die vim .iciulls rash flows ul the ... i market. 



....... 



ary.llllvl.ippi 

rhmuism il.. 



ars mine like 
i. anything 



".uict/hci 

Ovci llic lust half-dccadc. a mniilicr ..I 

) R" * lists l'»™ reacted, nol I.) moving lo 

Hollywood. Ilill t.y crawling ..n.unil in tile de- 
er.: pil end of die at I ptay|H-n. Working iiidr|x.-u- 
,1... .1, anil in dircrsr media, artists su< h as Mike 
K, Iky. ( lady Nolaiid, Ceo. r I Icrold .,.,.1 |cssica 
Diainmiil have crralrd anemic, uluil winks 
»•■ lame thai lhcy ,1)1 inn: I. Raising 

ipicslillnsahtllllCldlllialailllllilily. llliv bland of 
|.alhelic an holds i.|i a HuilicW minor li> mil 

asks iu n> 1 1 -dunk ill liiiiliims of faihue anil sue- 



Tin 



kc 



■ e ..i calc.ilatc.llypatl.elie as in C.ry S 

Ij-ihcnvius sprawliiiR mslallaliun al .SIhmIi: 

Wayne Cnllny, the m.lpul ul a licliliuus alio 
rgn namril C.iii.l).." Al.. i.K will. pn u.Ii.iiui- 

tcssii.unl siairiurnis iciiiiR C. ,..-., as .. 

wliiuy. wllpilyiiiR ami selr-ubsrxscd Ra) lieu- 

iH.rr.ever, Rim ilayisc irmly v 

able, Had,, and I. iviall) I. -..111.11 H...I ( i.ndyass' 
true .null. mi iv lailurc: awkwardly nailed Ml 

1 <-,. ii,, and pants willi ciiilmiiili'iriliiirs- 

sages ("Kirk M. •"): Il lirsnuvcni 1 

lollcgiaic |H.-n»;u.» CI il ks." "Mis. , yurim") 

rl.illir llic Kalltiy. K ivii. K il llic- look ..I ajuniur- 

higl.schuul It IK rralls leans 

Much ofitalv. looks like wolk In ' 



„|«.r.,iy., 



„l l.ribnwil/'ssh. 



■Iiilrciiilhi/cil iw Ik-Ihk «>| luniMic.de 

iiv.mvi , nippam and empty. Al ,.nc level. ih< 
slum in iiliinhir.il) iv .ill ul .(.use lliing., Inn till 

.,,,1,1 Is Mealing i.lcas I...... hctlci-klmwi 

cull, anno, ,... I. ... Kellry and Nnland. Iiccauv. 






ikprocl. Tl 



,1 Incline I.I., 






Allhe Inflllis 

aiiilmgofhowcill- 

made miurcci. As 
nly tiling more iu- 

: in wide chigh 

in i - pcrvmal- 



mal iilcniily. Mum lend luwai 
m cxpirssimi i.l mH loalhing thai Likes on il 
chining lour ..r .. ik-muiali/ril I'cc-wcc lie 
nan. A lew ohjccls — die n ndcly Idle 
hat reads 'laisr. line hums line." m 
dcaldhoa.d siiiisciccns .tamped will. 

.'lease don'l steal my r; i. I'm cpiccrl 

■ukr, ight laughier. 

Balancing tn cscll-dcpiccaliiiR luiinor is 

in ncraui.ii.il injciliun i.f self-help bathos, rc- 
icalrd here as simply-anothcr side <>r consumer 
■lienatiun. In a pa. lie ularly tilling piece. Iwo 
lur.cn brand-new irdily hears ^ii .,n die Hum 
Ircsscd In In ighlycllow smock., all ,.r nl.irl. 



' I 

ing boxes an 

ualily.m.lp. 



•ll sign 
c Mack 
,e plea 



1 I'-"! R" 



da) 
Like llu 



I...I righl now i, 
kiisrh comllllMlily an uf |rlf Kimmis, die pieci 
alludes in llic way an lias liem .c-ihiced in llu 
Slams i.r codec tililr. Inn UiUwil/.'s wi.ik alsi 

in.ik.-i il..- |-..i,i iha i lam. n lei l he sell ha 

hern siiililailydruiuled. Ill llic society C.l.ld).lv 
dial li, llu- sell isirganli .1 a hil likr a pel. some 



aim, 



pc. son;. Knees some l.ar.ll g |- 

die politics of nai cisiiuu and in curollar y. a cul- 

In a KKicly ulncucd with appearances. W 
u.c. like .acii.n are uraled a. c.i.iclic blciii- 
idiel or a <asc of hall brcalh, a problem lo Ikt 
ronrealc.l lalhcr llian extirpated. Such cn- 
■Icmic l-UKKjiiy-ii a*idic«cd with disarming 
l.mno. by the sl.owi llrongcst work, a ca,,K-,c,l 
rcciangle whose c..l-u„i leile.s gour.ly an- 
ncince. -Thc.c Are 2 Tilings I Nccil lo U'.ucli 



ART 



1 die Rrsi i.r My Ufc: My Wciglil and My R.i- 
cistn." DcMiid of llic caiy inoiat stilMrriciriiy uf 

Hid oiii feelings of |Klsimal iii.idequae)-. Vic- 
litiii/cd liy media dial ptoinulc images of pcr- 
frclion, v,c liwik In l.ancfcr Ihc sling lo other 

laribuwiu's rehisal III divmce die [Kiliiics of 
self rr<..i. die sanitized realms of high an and 
commercial media makes (or --.miic amusing 
■minimis, especially when sublime cultural 
icons a.c abruptly brought down lo the level of 
an adolescent wel ill cam. In a typically amateur- 
id, collage, a photograph of German an guru 
|nscph Rcuys is pasted ove, a v-iuimcual g.cel- 
ing card dial begins. 'I'm in lore villi a man 
who i^ g,-iillc a. .<! kind . . ." Uibowiu willily 
ilrsilbliinalcs bnlll llallm.uk kitsch and an- 
worhl hero worship'into a gay love ball.. 

larihowilr mocks cclcluily worship with a 
sciicsorglosiyBxIO head shots fealliring his 
own lie.,, ded face and accompanied by li,....|v 
cr sii, kci s evoking bis homosexuality CI Slop 
lor lli.js, - -Wanted: Oveiiiiglu Mraniligful 



C/vnv Leidowiti's ncrusAL to divorce the politics of self 

FROM THE SANITIZED REALMS OF HIGH ART AND COMMERCIAL 

MEDIA MAKES FOR SOME AMUSING MOMENTS, ESPECIALLY WHEN 

iulll Mi; CULTURAL ICONS ARE ABRUPTLY BROUGHT DOWN TO THE 

LEVEL OF AN ADOLESCENT WET DREAM. 



-cvcnseir-piiy-c..nh*ecx|K-rienii ugh 

mations i cprinliiccd on culfeeiups and work- 
place posters. 



LH 



prisnna. U-ihowilr.humuiolislywiukshis 

way lu the rmc uf issues rcnti run- 

irmpiirary ail-.uaking. including .he 

wayicwi-uiifiisc |.aial< ihc naufan 

anisl fii.iu <b mi,,,; .,1 bis ni I.,, wu.k, I.. 

toes, l.aiuly.m' • ', „.,„,,„ „,- _ ., |,„||, 

Xcli.xcd cup) of ,u luinsil) Ijiicd due iimcnl — 

tradslikrahan-alleslii iytupiiMiii.ilin.ido 

ipiacy. Tin mil a. small .„ I ivuulil like in lie." 

awalr/polilieallyco'iieitaj 1 mn ilr to Ik-. - 

A Utile limliri i. : suggests lh.il making art is 

l'"W.,yolk R m.la, „R ihc "sc 

" ""I I h)inR away , x 

■»urs, l.nl u ; „l ciui.sly .upcrlicial 



Ri-l.ilionsl.ip-). Ily including plio.oRraphs of 
hinnelr— including a ftoiil.il nude — he con- 
luscs llic line between his private and public 
pcrsonas Where doc. Candyass begin and 
laribnwiti leave ..If? Il doesn't really seem lo 
mallei. ]im as Candyavs is Irapjicd within a 
vocabulary ..[ disposable jokes and novelty 
items, llu- arliu'. identity get. reduced lo an 
algebra of want ads. 

For the Html pari, i1txin|iparrnily<lcs|>cniic 
la, k ,.f oiigmulity i, whr.c Ihc |,oi K ,,ancy of this 
slum lies I he drspcr.uinn comes across imnl 
ileal I) in the bright colors and ouhcranltlisar- 
i ay or die inslallalion, a li.inlic falvc cheer dial 
mn i. .i< lube culture av well as die upbeat self. 

|,iom.,ii,,n engaged in by >.. many conicm|»- 
niry artists. The biggest problem wills a cult ui 
salesmanship — which is what .,,., happy-talk 
culture ...LI. up lo — i. thai il allows no room 

f»r Lining Fur all I Itching and ...- 

ing. ncuhr. doc. a dyjfiinclional character 
lili Candyass, an, I dial's llic saddest — and 
musl resonant — (aci recorded by this persist- 
endy whiny show. ITJ 



^ i UJ3 



NWdti^M; 



*t*sf.^r«»^CT 




Cary S. Leibowitz/ 
Candyass at Stux 

Cary S. Leibowitz goes by the 
alias Candyass because, like a 
certain type ot comedian — Pee 
Wee Herman, lor example — his 
art revolves around the protec- 
tion of a fictional persona. This 
character is a young, gay. de- 
pressed, petulant, weak-willed, 
self-pitying, self-indulgent, self- 
obsessed, manipulative neurotic 
who charms us with his disarm- 
ingly contessional wit. 

With this, his second New York 
solo show, Leibowitz took a sur- 
prising turn toward commodity- 
critique Conceptualism He 
turned the gallery into a store 
slocked with mechanically pro- 
duced multiples: rugs, dinner 

plates, teddy bears, pennants, 
miniature baseball bats, felt ban- 
ners, wallpaper and so on; each 
of these items is imprinled wilh a 
Candyass-slyle text. The gallery 
thus became a mock souvenir 
shop dedicated lo Leibowilz's 
own trademark persona. The 18- 
inch baseball bats are prinled 
wilh the words "I want to love 
you bull [sic] I don't know how"; 
a hundred little teddy bears wear 
little yellow vests that say, "I will 
'make a Cubist painting someday 
but right now it is not important," 



a text that also appears on an 
edition of black floor mats. Dinner 
plates carry texts such as the 
poem "A Whiney Asshole," 
which reads in part, "I don't 

deserve anything I have/I say 
bad things about good people/ 1 
am a terrible person/ My friends 
should kill me." This is also 
printed on 200 large cardboard 
boxes that were stored in Hat 
lened states and were intended, 
one imagined, to be used by cus- 
tomers lo carry away their Can- 
dyass-ware. 

Visually, it was a handsome 
installation. Leibowitz cannily imi- 
tated boutique decor, wrapping 
silver wallpaper (bearing the 
phrase "I am a miserable and sel- 
(ish person") around the lower 
part of the gallery walls and 
applying multicolored triangular 
flags — "Depression Pennants" 
saying things like "Life Sucks" 

and "Misery Rules" — all over the 
upper walls to produce a jazzy 
background The added repeti- 
tion ol object multiples created n 
gratifying feeling ol visual unity. 
Thus, unlike his wimpy Candyass 
persona. Leibowitz seemed an 
artist ol considerable self assur- 
ance, ingenuity, clearheaded 
ness and energy. 



.sjtJEEl 



But it was primarily the con- 
ceptual aspect that gave the 
show its edge. On one level, it 
was a funny parody of the mar- 
keting of certain celebrities — Dol- 
: lywood and Spike's Joint are two 
| enterprises that come to mind. It 
was particularly funny because 
the character being marketed — a 
rather creepy "whiney ass- 
hole"— is not the sort likely to be 
admired by the masses This was 
further complicated by the Relive 
circumstance that Candyass is 
marketing himself- Replacing art- 
making wilh self promotion. Can- 
dyass enacted a narcissistic am- 
bition similar to that represented 
by Barbara Bloom's 1989 installa- 
tion The Reign ol Narcissism, 
which was an ironic museum- 
cumshrme dedicated to the art- 
ist hersell in the guise ol a 
famous writer. Like Bloom's per- 
sona. Candyass is narcissism 
personified; he epitomizes the 
kind of ambition thai aspires not 
to do anything of real value but 
rather seeks desperately lo be- 
come recognized, admired and, 
ultimately, loved by the world, 
even il it means shamelessly 
exploiting himself. His work rep- 
resents a fundamentally neurotic 
fantasy of success that is all too 
prevalent in our society 

— Ken Johnson 




October 9,1990* Vol. XXXV No.4 1 • The Weekly Newspaper of New York • Si. 00 





e 

of Soho 

Cary Leibowitz, a/Jc/a Candyass, Is a Nerd on the Run 




s tffiQ 



65 




By Vince Alctti 

Cary Leibowitz Is whining. His 
firsl full-scale New York one-man 
show is going to open in two 
days — on what is, not at all coin- 
cidental^, his 27th birthday — and 
the walls and floors at Stux arc 
already filled with what the artist 
rails "bric-a-brac": commercially 
anufacturcd multiples like felt 
football pennants that say life 

SUCKS, DROP DEAD, and MISERY 

rules; a floor mat with the words 

LOSER LINE FORMS HERE; Small 

baseball bats imprinted I want TO 
luv v butt i dont no how; and a 
baseboard strip of silvery wallpa- 
per with a pale green scrawl that 
says. "I am a miserable and selfish 
person." and. as an afterthought, 
"I rcalK am very lucky." Echoing 
that line. Leibowitz looks pained 
and aJmtts. "I know I'm really 
luck> for having this show, but I 
3lso think. Oh. I'm never going to 
be like really successful. I'm just go- 
ing to tx like this jerk and my style 
is never going to change and people 
are goinj: to get sick of me and I 
walk around and I just feel like ev- 
erything bad happens to mc." 
Several of the pieces in 
Lcibowilz's show, including a set 
of dinner plates and stacks of flat- 
tened cardboard boxes, arc print- 
ed with a text titled a whiney ass- 
hole. Some lines: "I liate 
cvcrvbo'dy/I hale everything/! 
hate m\ self/1 hate my lifc/I try to 

^ be fashionable/! should be shot." 
.ome observers would surely 

•■ agree Since his splashy, trashy 
New York debut in a 1989 Stux 
invitational, Lcibowitz has been 
spewing aggressively artless bits of 
woik across gallery walls, and this 



latest installation is his most in- 
sidiously autobiographical. Two 
copies of his "artists statement" 
begin, "I like lo pretend I'm 
someone else as much as possible 
so I won't get too too depressed," 
and continue, "If I were good at 
something else I probably would 
avoid art." When pressed, 
Lcibowitz is at a loss about what 
else he might do except more po- 
litically engaged work. "I wish I 
could do what Karen Finlcy 
does." he sajs. "I think that's real- 
ly powerful. Or I wish that I could 
be one of these really driven peo- 
ple in ACT UP. Sherric Levinc is 
this genius and Jeff Koons is this 
genius and the only thing I have 
to offer is like autobiographical 
things 'cause 1 really don't have 
any great thoughts on much else." 
Lcibowitz needn't worry about 
being an activist — he's jusl as 
valuable as a comedian, and right 
now he's playing the schlcmicl of 
Soho. Bearded, louslc-haircd, and 
dressed in plaid shorts, a faded 
green T-shirt, and multicolored 
canvas sneakers — if he tried to be 
fashionable today, he failed 
again — he looks like a harried yc- 
shiva student, a nerd on the run. 
Against one wall, he's propped a 
fiamcd photo poster of himself in 
the nude with a lop hat and a 
hard-on, and at the gallery desk 
there's a free calendar full of more 
nude self-portraits (every month 
is September, with his birthday 
marked and the word homo in one 
corner). "I did the nude shots be- 
cause it was an art show and I felt 
like I should," he says sheepishly, 
but his deliberately homely self- 
exposure (he's standing in a bath- 
room door, opening a washing 



machine, pushing a vacuum) is. 
like all his work, as shrewd as it is 
silly. Tweaking the image of the 
fearless artist. Lcibowitz slyly de- 
flates not just his hcros — I love 
jeff koons. a painting in his last 
Stux show said — but all avant- 
garde pretensions. 

One of the plates piled up in 
gift boxes on the floor is a confes- 
sion that seems designed to under- 
mine his critics: "The only thing 
more superficial than me is my 
work." But Leibowitz wears his 
superficiality as an ironic badge; 
he's both making and mocking 
art. believing and subverting the 
hype. DON'T look < originality. 
and expect copying, warn two big 
felt banners in the front room, 
and much of the show is 
Lcibowilz's playful hommage to 
art stars: "The floor mats arc kind 
of Jenny Holzer, the tedd)' bears 
are kind of Jeff Koons, the wallpa- 
per is kind of Andy Warhol, the 
banners and pennants are kind of 
Ed Ruscha." Replaying famous 
gambits in such humble materials 
(the little teddy bears that ring (he 
front gallery are the sort you'd 
win at a street fair), Lcibowitz is 
so cheerfully vulgar that the origi- 
nals begin to look overblown. 
"My work is kinda stupid-look- 
ing." Leibowitz acknowledges, 
and he seems determined to keep 
it that way. 

"People call me an artist be- 
cause I made this stulTand it's in 
an art gallery." Lcibowitz says in 
his run-on way. "but I kind of feel 
uncomfortable with that because I 
don't know what I am, and this is 
dealing with decoration and archi- 
tecture and space and just making 
• hopefully led more rc- 



up in suburban Connecticut and 
studied first architecture, then in- 
terior decoration, at Pratt and 
FIT before enrolling in general art 
courses at the University of Kan- 
sas. Though he graduated from 
Kansas. Leibowitz says he felt 
"expelled" from the art depart- 
ment because they "hated" his 
physique photo collages, dumb 
text pieces, and painted dollar 
bills — much of it explicitly gay 
work. They didn't let him in the 
graduate exhibition — they told 
him he was conning himself — so 
he put on his own show, complete 
with Partridge Family music. 

A year later, living in Boston 
and "determined to show my 
friends I'll never get into any 
show," Lcibowitz sent "a really 
stupid letter" and a batch of slides 
to the curators of the annual 
"Boston Now" show at the Insti- 
tute of Contemporary Art. To his 
astonishment, they not only ac- 
cepted him but encouraged him to 
show a whole wall of work, much 
of it stuff Kansas had snubbed. "I 
wouldn't have had the guts to do 
that," Leibowitz confesses, "but 
when it was up on the wall, I real- 
ized that the salon style really 
worked, because people spent 
more lime, and even if they didn't 
like it in the end, there was a 
seduction quality — they just had 
to look at all of these things." 
That seductiveness worked again 
in his wall- and then room-filling 
installations at Stux in 1989 and. 
earlier this year, at galleries in 
Paris and Diisseldorf. 

Leibowitz, who adopted the al- 
ternate signature Candyass two 
years ago after sitting around with 
friends reminiscing "about the 
names they were called as "queer 
boys." worries that people will be 
disappointed in his "bric-a-brac' 
show because it's not as gay as hi 
previous installations. (At Stux 
last fall, the pennants read gi 
fags and homost\te. and a ncai 
belt-buckle "triptych." your dio 
here, was in WcsscI O'Connor"' 
just-closed "Queer" show.) But n 
sex is overwhelmed by kvctchinf 
this time around, the aulobiogra 
phy is still right in your face. Cu 
into a plush carpet is the message 
"There arc 2 things I need lo 
watch for the rest of my life; mj 
weight and my racism." "I'm no: 
as politically correct as I would 
like to be," Lcibowitz notes in hi: 
"artists statement." but the artjsi 
who made a scries of "Fuck Mc 
Raw" paintings isn't likely to be 
correct anytime soon. He talks 
about how "tricky" it is to d 
AIDS pieces because he's no 
HIV-positive and "I don't want I; 
do things that aren't honest wit; 

VOICE October 9. ; 



mi'. I don'i warn to make corn-- 
menu on olher people's lives." 
S l he'll continue lo comment 
on his own: "The defense I've al- 
ways had about my work is that. 
» •»" right, it might not be like ge- 
stuff and it might not be 
^F , Ihshailcring and it copies a lot 
her people, but it's documen- 
tation. This is some guy who grew 
up in the suburbs in 1963 and he's 
gay and he's making work and a 
gallery's showing him." But the" 
whining continues. Because he 
doesn't want them to sec his nude 
photos. Lcibowiu has told his 
parents that there's a "family 
day" after the opening just for 
them when he plans lo put that 
stuff away. His parents come to 
all his shows, he says, "and my 
father's really amazed that people 
will pay hundreds or thousands of 
dollars for something I made. But 
he'll still once in a while say 
something like. 'Well, what arc 
you going lo do when all this 
shits over?' " Candyass sighs.'' 
"There's a part of me that maybe 
is a little defeatist." he says. "I 
know I'm stuck with this show the 
way it is. so I'm not going to make 
any great changes. I know I'm 
stuck with the way I look, so I'm 
not going to be too worried about 
it I can't let all my negative 
^v l >mgs weigh me down because 
% 1 would just really kill myself 

""or something." ■ 

"bric-a-brac" continues through 
October 6 at Stlt.X Gallery. 155 
Spring Street. 






VOICE October 9.' I'. 



r 



Margaret Crane/Jon WInet 

c/o 1508 Grant Street 
Berkeley, California 94703 

415/526-5495 



EXHIBITIONS 



solo 

1990 

1989 
1986 
1985 

group 
1991 



I. 



1990 



1989 



The Rising Storm Mincher/Wilcox Gallery, San Francisco, California. 
This Is Your li/e Phelan Award Exhibition, SF Camerawork, San Francisco. 
The Bush Presidency Allied Arts Gallery, Las Vegas, Nevada, 
Margaret Oane/Jon WInet Media, San Francisco. 
Days Clark County Library, Us Vegas. 



Iniage/Object/Place Oliver Gallery, California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, 

California. Curated by Maria Porges. (scheduled for September) (catalog) 

Hydrangea Presents San Francisco Terrain Hydrangea Gallery, Newport, Rhode 

Island. 

Do You Hear What I'm Saying? Transamerica Building Gallery, San Francisco. 

Curated by Judy Kay & Associates. 

Group Exhibition Mincher/Wilcox Gallery, San Francisco. 

Projections in Public: Grand Rapids Urban Institute of Contemporary Art, Grand 

Rapids, Michigaa 

text/context San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, San Jose, California. 

Omnia Ad Majorem Del Glorlam Grace Cathedral, San Francisco. Curated by Peter 

Wright/Terrain Gallery. 

A Presumption of Faith Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica, California. 

First Moscow Festival of Contemporary Art Center for Photography, Moscow, 

U.S.S.R. 

The Great American FAX Attack Andrea Ruggieri Gallery, Washington, D.C. 

Projections In Public: Clevland Spaces, Clevland, Ohio. 

How Can They Be So Sure? LACE, Los Angeles, California. 

Social Context Frohring Art Gallery, Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio. 

Manipulation In Photography THE Gallery, New York, New York. 

Bay Area Conceptuallsm: Two Generations Hallwalls, Buffalo, New York. 

(unpublished catalog) 

What's Wrong With This Picture? Artists Respond To Censorship San Francisco 

Arts Commission Gallery, San Francisco, (catalog) 

Summer Sculpture Invitational Sheppard Gallery, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, 

Nevada. 

Art Against AIDS: a sale exhibition of contemporary works of art Butterfield & 

Butterfield, San Francisco. Organized by AmFAR. (catalog) 

Art Against AIDS 'On The Road Public Art Campaign using transit system signage. 

Curated by Annie Philbin. Project travelled to Washington, D.C. and Chicago, Illinois 

in 1990. (catalog) 

Beyond The Frame; Nine Photographic Installations Richmond Art Center, 

Richmond, California. 

Restralnt/lntent/Manipulatlon Mincher/Wilcox Gallery, San Francisco. 

The Family Show Artists' Television Access, San Francisco. 



r- 



r 



Margaret Crane/Jon Winct 

Exhibitions List 

page two 



1989 The New Narrate logy San Francisco Artspace Annex, San Francisco. Exhibition 

travelled in 1989 to the Santa Cruz County Museum of Art, Santa Cruz, California, and 

the Center for Fine Arts, Miami, Florida, and in 1991 to the Center for Research in 

Contemporary Art, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas. Curated by Maria 

Porges. (catalog) 

MATTER ANTI-MATTER Terrain Gallery, San Francisco. 
19H8 Comment Nexus Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia, (catalog) 

Memory: an exhibition to mark the 25th anniversary of the assassination of 

John F. Kennedy Center for Research In Contemporary Art, University of Texas at 

Ailington. 

Election Night Fever San Francisco Artspace Annex. San Francisco. 

A Nightmare on Valencia Street HI Intersection for the Arts, San Francisco. 

Visual Volces/a spoken word event (performance) Southern Exposure, San 

Ftancisco. 

(catalog) 

Wall to Wail New Langton Arts, San Francisco. 

Festival of Plagiarism Artists' Television Access, San Francisco. 
1987 Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves Works, San Jose. 

Edict and Episode Installation, San Diego, California, (catalog) 

Reconnaissance MEDIA, San Francisco. 

Projections In Publics San Diego Installation, San Diego. 

Projections In Public: Los Angeles L.A.I.CA, Los Angeles. 
1986 Perilous Sanctuary MEDIA, San Francisco. 

Publication-specific Works 

"From The Abyss To The Brink" Poetics Journal, vol. 9 (Berkeley, California) 

•I'm With Stupid" Five Fingers Review, no. 8/9 (San Francisco, California) Fall 1990 

"This Is Your Life" SF Camerawork Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 1 (San Francisco 

Camerawork, Inc., San Francisco, California) Spring 1990 

"Treasure These Sentiments" Photometro, vol. 6, Issue 6l (San Francisco, 

California) August 1988 

"Perestrolka" White Walls, no. 18 (Chicago, Illinois) Winter 1988 

"Days" Frank, no. 5 (San Francisco, California) Spring 1986 



bibliography attached 

Margaret Crane/Jon Winet are represented by Mincher/Wilcox Gallery, 228 Grant Street, San 
Francisco, California 94108. » 415/433-4660 fax 415/433- 6818 



t Leslie Singer 

V 3352A 26th Street 

San Francisco, CA 94110 
(415) 285-0539 



EXHIBITIONS 



1991: October "The Rock Show," Southern Exposure Gallery, San Francisco 

September Performance with Kevin Killian, The Lab, San Francisco 
August "Festival of Disco Dancing and Swimming," Olympia, WA 

July Feature Gallery, New York 

May "Spew--The Nomographic Convergence," Randolph Street Gallery, 

Chicago 
May New Langlon Arts, San Francisco 

April "Nasty Girls," Other Cinema, San Francisco 

April "The Sunshine and Sugar Show," Artists' Television Access 

San Francisco 
March "Re-mapping Boundaries," Artist's Space, New York 

February Guest Artist, Beginning Performance/Video, San Francisco Art 

Institute 

1990: December "New Bay Area Work," San Francisco Cinematheque 

November "Lines of Flight," Hallwall's Contemporary Art Center, Buffalo 
November "Body Language: Studies in Female Expression," Artist's Space, 

New York 
November "The Body Politic: Recent Video Art by Bay Area Women 

1987-1990," Film Arts Festival, Roxie Theater, San Francisco 
October "In Your Face," The Kitchen, New York, solo presentation 
June Belluard/Bollwerk Festival, Fribourg, Switzerland 

May "United States of Americana," The Lab, San Francisco 

March "Culture Junkies," Pacific Film Archive, University Art Museum, 

Berkeley 

1989: April "The Body and Other Tales of Joy and Woe," Critical Art Ensemble, 

Tallahassee 
April Guest Artist, Introduction to Video, New College of California, 

San Francisco 
January "Hot Box," Artists' Television Access, San Francisco, solo presentation 

1988: October "Video Refuses Festival," Life on the Water, San Francisco, 

performance 
October "Alternative Medicine," Mexic-Arte, Austin 

June "Visceral Video," CEPA Gallery, Buffalo 

May "The Best of San Francisco," Nine One One, Seattle 

February Panelist, Festival of Plagiarism, Artists' Television Access, 

San Francisco 

1987: May International Music and Video Festival, Zaragoza, Spain 

April "Spank Your Fish," Media, San Francisco 

1986: October "Video Refuses Festival," San Francisco Camerawork 

September "Wandering Into the Shadow of the Earth," Art Motel Nine, Club 

Nine, San Francisco 
June "Epic Video," Artists' Television Access, San Francisco 

February "American Kulture Nite," New College Gallery, San Francisco 



Leslie Singer 
3352A 26th Street 
San Francisco, CA 94110 
(415) 285-0539 

SELECTED VIDEOGRAPHY 

Retried Broccoli, 1985, 3 mins., color, VHS 

The Sigmund Freud Story, 1986, 17 mins., color, 3/4" 

Hot Dog Fat, 1986, 3 mins., color, VHS 

The Madonna Series, 1987, 3 mins., color, VHS 

Thailand DMV, 1987, 3 mins., color, VHS 

The Temptation of Wilma, 1987, 3 mins., color, VHS 

Laurie Sings Iggy, 4 mins., color, VHS 

Hot Rox, 1988, 38 mins., color, 3/4" 

My Lite as a Godard Film by Whitney Houston, 1988, 3 mins., color, VHS 

Priscilla Presley's Bathroom, 1988, 6 mins., color, VHS 

Smokie: Protrait of a Glitter Babe, 1989, 10 mins., color, 3/4" 

Flipper, 1990, 6 mins., color, 3/4" 

The Temptation of Jane, 1991, 50 mins., b&w, VHS (with Cecilia Dougherty) 

Hello World Goodbye San Francisco, 1991, 35 mins., b&w, VHS (with Cecilia Dougherty) 

SELECTED FILMOGRAPHY 

How to Fuck Friends and Keep Them, 1984, 3 mins., super-8 
Fountain of Youth, 1984, 3 mins., super-8 
After God 1 1 , 1984, 3 mins., super-8 
Blood Poisoning, 1985, 3 mins., super-8 
Boiled Fish, 1985, 3 mins., super-8 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Liz Kotz, "Re-mapping Boundaries: Video and Popular Culture," program notes, March 1991, 
Artist's Space, New York. 

Steve Seid, Pacific Film Archive program notes, University Art Museum Calendar, March 1990, 
p. 10. 

Patty Stirling, "Hot Rox." Swellsville . Winter 1989/90, pp. 47-48. 

Liz Kotz, "Interrogating the Boundaries of Women's Art: New Work in Video by Women," High 
Performance . #48, Winter 1989, pp. 36-41. 

Valerie Soe, "Video" Refuses: Champions of Unsung Heroes and the Plain Unpretentious," Video. 
Networks. December/January 1988/89, p. 22. 

Patty Stirling, "Food, Sweat and Jeers: The Art of Leslie Singer," Puncture . Fall 1988, p. 62. 

Leslie Singer, "Divorce Decree." Bloatstik . Fall 1988, pp. 18-19. 

Glen Thrasher, "Leslie Singer Interview," LQwJilfi, No. 11, 1987. 

Barbara Rice, Two White Chicks Sitting Around Talking About Art." Truly Needy . No. 9, 1985, 
pp. 32-33. 




■ • ■ . . •'f 

. ,y- 

,..■ 



*{^i» Wk 'J I .JiK ■■ 



■■■ 




BUI 



(R> £W 



13 



Oft 



<r~> 



. <8> 



Dave Ot+o 




■ ivo Otto" by Leslie Singer 
b- L 12", pastel on paper 
3352A 2c th St., SF, CA 9'HIO 

Photo: Cecilia Dougherty 



Cary leibowilz's 
overindulgenl wall installation pivots on 
the self satisfaction and material comforls 
implicit wilhin the American Dream — and 
•tie pressures and pains of pursuing il. He 
bears witness to cultural pressures to sup- 
press one's individuality and desires in a 
risky barter for security and success. 

Bittersweet stories 

Cai-y S_ L_eifc>owitz 



Cary leibowiti 

Bom I 963 New Vock MY 

ill li 5 tituie | | e -.\ r -vi r <,■ 
1981 Hi 

■logy. Mew 
il ' ! 083 8*1 

''onsas 1987 

Selected Exhibitions 
1988 

... i P riper. 
(Institute ol Conlemporary Acl. Boston 
MA 

i Being Gov. Hallways. 
Bulfolo NY 
1989 

■ Mibrtton. Slux Gallery. Mew 
Vorl [ IV 
Corv 5 (eibowitz/Conc/yoss. Slux 

1 lew York MY 

Selected Bibliography 
Bonelli. David. "Paper Prophets " 
Boston Phoenix. July. 1 988 
Nolley. Jon "Sugar Buns. ' Qui 
Week. September, 1989 



express Ine excruciating experiences of ex- 
clusion, including one about a "fat and 
ugly sixth grade girl" who was ridiculed 
("even by llie teachers") when she tried 
blue eye shadow, or the miserable gay 
junior high school boy who has convinced 
himself that his life "is a cruel joke on all of 
us". Why change, a slinging story of bad 
luck, concludes "when good luck come to 
their door one day years later they thought 
il was one of those scams and slammed the 
door... the end" Perhaps most chilling of all 
is the short piece he was his molheislavorile 
about an early AIDS dealh which ends 
"and nobody could figure out what he died 
from in 1982". 

Other works dream- 
ily depict life in the highest lax bracket; 
pages from auction catalogues for jewelry 
have been inscribed "and ihey lived hap 
pily ever after " or "she was very rich and 
Pretty tool". Some images allude to class 
stratification; Leibowilz has pasted a black 
and while backyard snapshot from the 
'40s of a middle class "Rosannah+Mac" 
labeled "Happy as ever." onto a colorful 
cover of Architectural Digest featuring the 
Washington DC. mansion Blair House. 
Fate — good luck and bad luck (often linked 
with guilt) — haunt leibowilz's work lines 
of warning, wisdom, and witticisms from 
Chinese fortune cookies (actually invented 
in America) are a frequent element in his 
collages, often paired wilh a strip of pho- 
loboolh portraits Perhaps most poignant 



are the rags to riches tales, such as the one 
painted large onto the wall. An ordinary 
girl not only wins the lottery, but also 
marries the world's richest man (whom she 
meets on a cruiseliner). But she is still 
trapped in her underclass mentality, buy- 
ing clothes "because il reminded her of her 
bosses wife's pretty things." 
Surrender to chance does battle wilh the 
perennial American 
spirit ofSelf-lmprove- 
menl, (also often 
linked wilh guilt). The collage Vigor lor 
Men Over 30 demonstrates that there's 
even hope for Eisenhower whose postage 
stamp has been pasted over the alhlele in 
this image taken from a cheap paperback. 
Leibowilz's presenta- 
tion is infused wilh a tense irony. While his 
story A tile of Misery is engraved like a 
wedding invitation, others are typed (off- 
center and full of mistakes) onto pedestrian 
yellow lined paper, or transcribed in a 
handwritten scrawl onto images of valu- 
able jewels. He has covered part of the 
wall wilh a clunky pastel colored clipper 
ship wallpaper (of his own design) onto 
which he has spread his variously framed 
items. His framing, which ranges from the 
overly ornate to cheap dime-store models, 
purposefully strays far from taste. Hard- 
ware is clunky and obvious. Scattered 
indiscretely wilh pictures, his gaudy wall 
works betray a showy, materialistic urge. 
Leibowilz, who was 
raised in suburban Connecticut, is wary of 
yet nonetheless drawn into this nation's 
seduction by the trappings of class, power, 
money, good looks, and a large and stable 
family A puzzle of responses to middle 
class self dissatisfaction, which range from 
helplessness to denial to recovery through 
the lottery or self improvement books, this 
installation is odd but urgent evidence of 
the clash between the materialistic and 
mainstream with the personal and spiri- 
lual. 



Installation 1989 

Wall painting, wallpaper, liamed collages 

and stones 

i , , ul Si i. I ioll. i\ I lew 1..1I I IV 



rLtv/thl 



5he taught aLL new dothes^-fretr/ and shirf Stvmi 
Oinoj Somejust because^fi^ reminded her of he^bosses 
Wffes pretty thlngs.^^ g 

v)/)6 went on a cruise qnol met.th^ worLols 
richest man J^SOOaaXJOpoCstLibn^Lai 

-/(/-the/qot married and Lived -7 

happily ^yera£W. The end. 





MELISSA POKORNY MARCH 1991 

3264 ETTIE STREET 
OAKLAND, CA 94608 
415 547 4546 



EDUCATION 

June 1988 Master of Fine Arts 

University of California, Davis 
June 1986 Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville 

(Graduated with high honors) 
May 1983 Completion of two year fine arts transfer 

program, St. Louis Community College at 

Florissant Valley 

TEACHING EXPERIENCE 

1991 Visiting Lecturer, California State University 

at Stanislaus, Spring Semester. Ceramic 
Sculpture and Introduction to Drawing. 

1991 Instructor, College of Alameda, California. 



1989-1991 Instructor, Ohlone College, Fremont California 

Beginning and Advanced Sculpture, Museum and 

Gallery Techniques. 

Director, Ohlone College Art Gallery. 
1988-1990 Instructor, Walnut Creek Civic Arts Education 

Program, Walnut Creek, California. 

Instructor, Student Craft Center, University 

of California at Davis. 
1987-1988 Teaching Assistant, University of California 

at Davis: 

Beginning Sculpture / Lucy Puis 

Ceramics / Robert Arneson 

Sculpture / Manuel Neri 

Sculpture / Lucy Puis 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

1987 Distinguished Scholar Research Award, 
University of California, Davis 
Chosen to represent U.C. Davis at the annual 
• U.C. Inter-Campus Arts Program. Participated 
in a three day workshop with Rachel Rosenthal, 
performance artist, University of California, 
Irvine. 
1986 University of California Graduate Fellowship. 

Two Year Academic Achievement Award. 
1986 Jurors Choice Award, Student Exhibition, 

Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. 
1985 Friends of Art Honors Award, Southern Illinois 

University at Edwardsville. 

Academic Excellence Award, Southern Illinois 
University at Edwardsville. 



HONORS AND AWARDS, cont . 

1984 James Cardwell Award in Ceramics, Southern 

Illinois University at Edwardsville. 



EXHIBITIONS 
1991 



1991 



1991 
1990 
1988 

1987 
1986 

1985 



1984 



REVIEWS 



Introductions '91, Gallery Paule Anglim 

San Francisco, California 

Matrix International, 

Sacramento, California 

Jurors Squeak Carnwath, Lucy Puis 

Crocker Kingsley Annual, Crocker Art Museum, 

Sacramento, California 

Influences, Judith Weintrob Gallery, 

Sacramento California 

Richard L. Nelson Gallery, University of 

California, Davis 

Pence Gallery, Davis, California 

Figurative Clay 87, University Center Gallery, 

Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville 

Clay Today, New Harmony Gallery of 

Contemporary Art, New Harmony Indiana 

Milliken University, Decatur Illinois 

Four Artists, St. Louis Street Gallery, 

Edwardsville Illinois 

Modern Icons, Parrot Street Gallery, 

Evansville Indiana 

Wildey Art Center, Edwardsville Illinois 

Surface and Form, Lindenwood College, 

St. Charles Missouri 

37th Annual Mid-States art Exhibition, 

Evansville Museum of Art and Science 

New Horizons in Art, Chicago Public Library 



Victoria Dalkey, "The Sound of Distant Echoes", 

Sacramento Bee Encore Magazine, Sunday 

December 22, 1990. 
Victoria Dalkey, "The Best And The Brightest", 

Sacramento Bee Encore Magazine, Sunday June 

26 1988. 
"Clay Today in New Harmony", Ceramics Monthly, 

April 1987, p. 30. 
Roger McBain, "Unconventional Sculptures Form 

Clay Today", The Evansville Press, August 9 

1986, Arts p. 9 
Patti Aakhaus, "Modern Icons is Superbly Executed", 

Evansville Press, October 20, 1985. 

Kathryn Waters, Art in Review, Arts Insight, 

December 1985, p. 20. 
Figurative Clay 87, catalogue, Southern 

Illinois University at Edwardsville. 






a 



'J'J >5 




EDUCATION 



EXHIBITS 



KEVIN ?IJLLIL<AN 

19:4, San Francisco, Cfi 

SA, University of California, Los Angeles, 19S7 
University o-f San -ranciscc, 1932-1983 

1991 Sue Spaid Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA 



The Gus 



kon, Los Ange 1 



Cm 



PERFORMANCES 1938 "The Diaries o-f Paul Varnac", Instel 1 at i on/Performance 

Los Angeles Ccn temporary Exhibitions, Los Angeles, CA 
"Interview *ith Paul Varnac" , Live Broadcast on~KCRW, 
c ?n t :- Mon ica , CA 
1937 Livestock Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 
1935 With collective EISENHOWER, LACE, Los Angeles', CA 
"The Roo-f Project," Los Angeles, CA 
'Circumstance", Culver City, CA 
THE Gallery, Lcs Angeles, CA 



GROUP 
EXHIBITIONS 



PUBL1 C 
WORKS 



C URATE D 
EXHIBITS 



WRITINGS 



1991 "Ovarian Warriors vs. Knights o-f Crissum", Sue Spaid Fim 

Art, Lcs Angel es, CA 
1933 with Jan Tumlir, LACE, Los Angeles, CA 

with Jan Tumlir, Livestock Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 
, with Jan Tumlir, Barnsdall Art Center, Lcs Angsles, CA 
1937 "Top Art", Living End Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 

Artlandish, Los Angeles, C- 
1936 Living End Gallery;, Los Angeles, CA 

Frederick ?. Wight Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 
1935 Zero-One Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 

Ant i -Gal lery, Los Angeles, CA 

1991 "Workers o-f the Nation Agree", City Hall, Los Angeles, CA 
198? "Coming o-f Age," public piece with Jan Tumlir, 
Non-commissioned poster -fcr ART LA\3? 



^0 " Fron tier Tales," 
T-jml i r , LACE , i 



j ted by Kevin Sullivan and Jan 
ingeles, CA 



1991 "No More Heroes", DIPT 

19?Q "Frontier Tales," Catalogue ess?- 



1934 Fellowship, UCLA Vts Council 

1935 The CI i -f ton Webb Award-Painting, UCLA 



GRANTS/AWARDS 

ORGANIZATIONS 1939 Exhibition Commi t L ee , LACE, Los Angeles, CA 




SAN FRANCISCO ARTS COMMISSION GALLERY 

1 55 Grove Street, San Francisco. California 94 102 (415) 554-9682 



Em — Immediate Releas e November 14, 1991 

For information contact: Anne Meissner 

Kathleen Kolba 

415/554-9682 

CHAIN REACTION VII 

December 20, 1991 - February 14, 1992 

Reception: Thursday, December 19, 1991, S:00-7:00pm 

CHAIN REACTION VII opens Thursday evening December 19, 1991 at the 
San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery and runs through February 14, 1992. 
The method of selecting artists for this seventh annual Chain Reaction exhibit is 
similar to that of a chain letter. Five writers were invited by Gallery Director 
Anne Meissner to participate in this year's show. They, together with Gallery 
staff and Advisory Board Members, began chains by picking one artist each. 
That artist invited another who invited another. The unusual theme provides 
an opportunity for guests and 2/3rds of the exhibiting artists ao assume 
responsibility for curatorial selections. The subsequent &&&&£ Chains of three 
artists reveal connections and polarities within the Bay Area arts community 
and address a variety of artistic and community issues not often the subject of 
art exhibits. The success of six previous Chain Reaction exhibits was 
instrumental in choosing to repeat this exhibition concept again. 

With one work from each artist, the exhibit of thirty-nine works includes a 
wide range of contemporary art; installation, painting, sculpture and mixed 
media among them. Both established and emerging artists are represented in 
this year's Chain Reaction exhibit. 

Guest writers and artists' chains are: 

David Bonetti, art critic, San Francisco Examiner 

J. John Priola, Kathryn Weinstein, Judy Allen 
Whitney Chadwick, author, Women Artists and The Surrealist Movement . 

Susan Mabel Maney, Kathryn Eldredge, Janet Bogardus 
John Ryskamp, writer, Artweek . Artforum 

Jay Mayberry, Tia Takamitsu, Grover Jefferson 
Chiori Santiago, freelance journalist, San Francisco Chronicle . KPFA, 

Reiko Goto, Werner Klotz, Otmar Sattel 
John Turner, author of Howard Finster . Man of Visions 

David Slater, Deborah Barrett, Nelda M. Barchers 



A project of the S.F. Arts Commission and Friends of the Arts. 
Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Friday:! 1-5, Thursday 11-8, Saturday 12-5 



Gallery staff and selections are: 
Anne Meissner, Director 

Lisa Zaccaglini, Michael Shuster, Ethan Johnson 
Kathleen Kolba, Program Coordinator 

Elizabeth Medrano, Leigh Barbier, Beth Sudekum 

Gallery Advisory Board members and artists' chains are: 

Bonnie Earls-Solari, Ann Garcia Urriolagoitia, S. Scott Davis III, 

G. Sterrett Smith 
Helaine V. Fortgang, Rhoda London, Marlene Angeja, Kathleen Jesse 
Glen Helfand, Judy Gittelsohn, Bruce Pollock, Kathryn Sherwood 
Catherine Maechling, Barry Russakis, Christopher Doyle, David Tangney 
Armando Rascon, Lukas Felzmann, Richard Olsen, Mike Blockstein. 
Wayne Zebzda, Finley Frier, Linda Horning, Craig Nagasawa 

####### 
Photographic materials available on request. 

####### 

The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery is an exhibition space under the auspices of the 
City and County of San Francisco. Exhibition programs are funded in part by the California 
Arts Council, the LEF Foundation, and other business and private contributions. The 
Gallery's Exploration: City Site program receives sponsorship from Intersection for the 
Arts. The Gallery is a member of the National Association of Artists' Organizations (NAAO), 
Bay Area Consortium for Visual Arts (BACVA), and the Non-Profit Gallery Association 
(NPGA). 

####### 
Gallery Hours: 
Tuesday-Friday llam-5pm 
Thursday, llam-8pm 
Saturday, 12-5pm 

Gallery closed December 24 - January 4, January 18 
Free Admission. Handicap Accessible. 



November 5, 1991 

STAFF REPORT 

Commissioners, Visual Arts Committee 
FROM: Debra Lehane 

RE: Save Outdoor Sculpture Coordinating Organization 
Appl ication 

The National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural 
Property, the National Museum of American Art and the 
Smithsonian Institution are initiating a project called SOS 
(Save Outdoor Sculpture). It is a national survey to 
inventory sculpture in the outdoor environment which is 
publicly accessible. The project is designed to be 
performed by local agencies and collaborations are 
encouraged. We have been invited to apply. As a 
Coordinating Organization, we would be expected to develop a 
core of volunteers who complete surveys provided by the NIC. 
The surveys are then returned to the NIC for entry in a data 
base system. The second goal of the SOS project is to 
increase public awareness about the importance of caring for 
outdoor sculpture. To help defray the cost of implementing 
the surveys and awareness program, modest awards are being 
offered to the coordinating organization. Seventeen 
thousand dollars ($17,000) has been awarded for San 
Francisco. The Friends of the Recreation and Park 
Department have agreed to work with us in a collaborative 
effort on this project and to act as fiscal agent. I have 
recommended that we participate for the following reasons: 

-the Arts Commission is in the best position to successfully 

execute the survey and has the most to gain 
-we participated in the pilot study in 1989 and have a head 

start on creating the inventory list 
-it would correspond with our efforts to computerize the 

collection and provide much needed assistance with the 

inventory. We are mandated to perform inventories of the 

col lection . 
-it would provide assessments for establishing future 

conservation priorities 
-it would provide a means to generate more public interest 

in saving our outdoor statues and possibly help to build an 

endowment fund for maintenance 
-it is a highly visible program and provides for good public 

relations 
-it brings us local, state and national attention and 

recognition 

The Friends have agreed to participate since the Parks will 
also benefit from the efforts to raise public awareness. 
The parks are home to many of our outdoor sculptures and 
for years we have been trying to find a way to raise funds 
for the pieces located in the parks. 



The Project will be divided into two Phases. Phase one will 
be handled by the Arts Commission. Phase one consists of 
recruiting volunteers and performing the actually survey. 
The Conservation Lab at the Fine Arts Museums has agreed to 
assist with the required training sessions for volunteers. 
Volunteers would be solicited from local graduate programs 
in the arts and museum sciences, through the museums docent 
programs and the Friends of Rec/Park. Staff would be hired 
through the $17,000 award for the project to assist with the 
Arts Commission's responsibilities. I would supervise the 
Project Coordinator for the Arts Commission. His/Her 
responsibilities would be: 

-Recruit volunteers and trainers 

-Set agendas, schedules, syllabus 

-Hold training sessions for volunteers 

-Evaluate volunteers 

-Organize field supplies and materials 

-Define zones in city and make volunteer assignments 

-Perform site visits, review completed surveys 

-Act as volunteer liaison, answering questions 

-Fill in for drop outs 

-Prepare narrative reports of survey progress 

I will work closely with the Coordinator in guiding the 
project. I would guess that we are dealing with 
approximately 250 works which fall into the definition of 
outdoor sculpture as defined by the NIC. Molly and I have 
estimated that the project will take about 8 months which 
includes start up organization and actually survey 
completion. We can either begin in February or August of 
1992. The NIC has allowed for two years to complete the 
project. 

Phase II of the project involves the Public Outreach 
requirement of the project. The Friends of the Recreation 
and Park Department will serve as our 501c3 non profit 
fiscal agent. They will assume responsibility for planning 
and implementing the public awareness program. This will 
aid them in getting financial support for the conservation 
of the statuary in the parks system. Since a large majority 
of our monuments and statues are in the parks, this will be 
of great benefit to them. This phase of the project can be 
used to create a brochure explaining our program and the 
Arts Commissions role, as a fund raising event and as a kick 
off for an adopt a monument in the park campaign. 

We will be notified in January if our proposal is accepted. 




25 Von Ness Avenue 

Suite 240 

San Francisco. CA 94102 

(415)554-9671 

FAX #621-3868 



MAYOR 
Art Agnos 



COMMISSIONERS 
Barbara Sklar 
President 

Nancy Boas 
Vice President 

Vemon Alley 
Stanley Elchelbaum 
Daniel Genera 
Anne Healy 
John Kriken 
Robert F. LaRocca 
Genny Um 

Amalia Mesa-Bains, Ph.D. 
Qr^ rfc Okamoto 
^^ .ekrans 



EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum 
Library Commission. 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



DIRECTOR OF 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Joanne Chow Winshlp 



PROGRAMS 
Arts Festivals 
Civic Art Collection 
Civic Design Review 
Neighborhood Arts 
POPS Symphony Concerts 
Public Art Program 
Street Artists Ucenses 



Suite 430 

State-Local Partnership 

415-554-9677 

ArtHouse 

415-554-9679 



Arts Commission Gallery 
155 Grove Street 
4t W4 -9682 



3:00 I. 



I I 



AGENDA FOR REGULAR MEETING OF 
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 
3 P.M. , DEC. 18, 1991 
25 VAN NESS, SUITE 70 



Approval of Nov. 20, 1991 Minutes 
Consent Calendar 

A. Resolution to approve the loan of the 
Mark Adams Tapestries to the Moscone 
Convention Center for temporary 
installation beginning January 1992 
until a new site for the tapestries is 
approved at the San Francisco 
International Airport. 

B. Resolution to approve the relocation of 
the George Washington Statue to the San 
Francisco Police Dept . for installation 
in the lobby of 1 Jones Street. (Old 
Hibernia Bank Building). 

C. Authorization to modify contract for 
Acconci, Saitowitz and Soloman 
(Promenade Ribbon Project) to expand 
scope of work for artist team to include 
production of working drawings for South 
Embarcadero, pendind Port Commission and 
Sasaki approval; and to increase fee by 
$15,000 for this work. 

D. Authorization to further modify contract 
with Acconci, Saitowitz and Soloman to 
authorize team to proceed with 
development of a design concept for the 
North Embarcadero to include detailed 
drawings of all locations for art 
concepts and to increase fee by $45,000 
for fh i s work . 

E. Authorization to extend Alan Fleming's 
contract through Feb. 28, 1992. 

F. Approval of Aids Mural Project proposed 
by Arch Williams for Citv Health Clinic. 



vac/agl2.1 



Page 



3:10 Ml 



3:20 JV. 

3:35 V. 
3:45 VI . 
3:55 VII. 

4:05 VIII 



4:15 IX. 

X. 
Adjournment 



G. Approval for Mural 1 posed by 

Jesse Topacio for General Hospital. 

II. Approval for honorarium and travel 
payments for Muni-Metro finalists, 
Robert Mill ar , Car 1 Ch< 
Nina Yankowitz, and R.M. Fisher 

Co I 1 ec I. i ons 
Debra Lehane 

A. liiet>o Rivera Mural Update/Resolution of 
support . 

B. Request t o ret urn M ifa I I 

rompe tit i on macque tt J udy 

Pfaff and Ismael Fri 

Sunnydale Pump Station 
Jill Manton and Patricia Johanson 
Presentation and review of final working 
draw ini»s. 

Main Library 

Susan Pontious; Project update 

Tenderloin Art Enrichment 
Jill Manton; Progress report 

Taraval & Mission Police Stat. ions 
Tonia Macne i 1 

Status report and review of program 
guidelines . 

Ai rport 

A. Status of Master- Plan 

B. Potent Lai "sculpture niche" in 
International Terminal 

Old Business 

New Bus i ness 



vac/ag!2. 18 



Page - 2 



MINUTES 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE 

DECEMBER 18, 1991 

The meeting was called to order at 3:25 p.m. 

Commissioners present: Commissioners absent: 

Anne Healy, Chair Amalia Mesa-Bains 

Barbara Sklar 

y Boas 
Robert LaRocca 

St.nl f Present : 
J i 1 J Hani on 
Tonia Marneil 
Susan Pontious 
Debra Lehane 

I. Approval of minutes of meeting of November 20, 1991 

The minutes of the November 20, 1991, Visual Arts 
Committee meeting were approved as read on a motion by 
Commissioner LaRocca. Commissioner Sklar seconded. The 
ayes were unanimous. 

[I. Approval of minutes of meeting of November 8, 1991 

The minutes of the November 8, 1991, Visual Arts Committee 
meet ins; were amended to read: "Commissioner Boas noted 
thai she attended the artists' briefing and that she did 
not feel that the points she and others had raised at that 
time had been considered by the artists." (P. 6 paragraph 
5). The minutes were approved as amended on a motion by 
Commissioner LaRocca and seconded by Commissioner Sklar. 
The ayes were unanimous. 

III. Consent Calendar 

Item #B was removed from the consent calendar at the 
request of Commissioner Boas. 

A. Resolution to approve the loan of the Mark Adams 
Tapestries to the Moscone Convention Center for 
temporary installation beginning January 1992 
until a new site for the tapestries is approved 
at the San Francisco International Airport. 

C. Authorization to modify contract for Acconci, 

Saitowitz and Solomon (Promenade Ribbon Project) 
to expand scope of work for artist team to 



VAC-MIN1218.91-twm Page 



include production of working drawings foi .south 
Embarcadero, pending Port Commission and Sa aki 
approval; and to increase fee by (15,000 for 

this work. 

D. Authorization to further modi I with 
Acconci, Saitowitz and Solomon to authorize team 
to proceed with development of a design concept 
for the North Embarcadero to include detai 
drawings of ail locations for art concepts and 
to increase fee by $45,000 foi this work. 

E. Authorization to extend Alan Fleming's contra< t 
through February 28, 1992. 

F. Approval of Aids Mural Project proposed by Ai h 
Williams for City Health Clinii . 

G. Approval for Mural Project proposed bj Jesse 
Topacio for General Hospital. 

H. Approval for honorarium and travel paymenl 

Muni-Metro finalists, Robert Millar, tail t'heng, 
Nina Yankowitz and R.M. Fisher. 

The amended consent calendar was approved on a motion by 
Commissioner LaRocca. Commissioner Sklar seconded. The 
ayes were unanimous. 

III. Consent Calendar Item #B: Collections 

George Washington Statue 
Request for motion to approve the relocation of the George 
Washington Statue to the San Francisco Police Department 
for installation in the lobby of si Jones Street (Old 
Hibernia Bank Building). 

In response to questions from Commissioner Boas, Debra 
Lehane, Collections Manager, stated that the proposed move 
places the art back under the City's jurisdiction rather 
than the Board of Education. Lehane stated that it is 
appropriate to remove the sculpture from its present 
location at a school. She has contacted other agencies 
which were unable to house the sculpture, but the Police 
Department has been able to provide an appropriate site 
and is pleased with the plans. 

Commissioner Boas requested that the language of the 
motion be altered to note that this is a temporary, not a 



VAC-MIN1218.91-twm Page 



permanent installation. Commissioner Sklar moved to 
approve the relocation of the George Washington Statue to 
the San Francisco Police Department for installation at #1 
Jones Street (Old Hibernia Bank Builidng), until a more 
permanent location is found. Commissioner LaRocca 
seconded. It was so moved. 

IV. Collections: Diego Rivera Mural Update/Resolution 

Debra Lehane reported that she has met with members of the 
Diego Rivera Committee from City College of San Francisco 
regarding the proposed relocation of the mural. The 
Committee asked that the Commission provide a letter of 
support for the funding of planning and study of the 
proposed relocation, therefore Lehane drafted a resolution 
of support with Commissioner Mesa-Bains' assistance which 
she presented to the Committee. Lehane noted that she 
will continue to work with the Relocation Committee and 
Commissioner Mesa-Bains to provide guidance in the 
relocation process. Commissioner Boas moved to approve 
the language of a resolution of support for City College's 
efforts to obtain funds for the planning and study of the 
proposed relocation of the Diego Rivera mural. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. It was so moved. 

V. Collections: Moscone/Esplanade Ballroom macquettes 
Debra Lehane asked the Committee to review two pieces from 
the Moscone/Esplanade Ballroom competition for possible 
return to the artists. It was the Commissioner's decision 
to retain the pieces siting plans to mount an exhibition 
of Public Art proposals at some future date. 

VI. New Main Library 

Susan Pontious reported that the artists' proposals were 
seriously over budget. Staff will not know by how much 
until Friday, December 20, when the estimates for the cost 
of the projects' impact on the building will be available. 
The architect's charges for their additional services came 
in much higher than expected, and staff is pursuing 
whether or not a reduction in these charges can be 
negotiated . 

In any case, the projects as currently proposed are still 
considerably over budget, and painful compromises will 
have to be made. Pontious will be preparing final budgets 
for the Committee's review. 

Pontious requested that the Committee approve an expansion 
of the scope of work of Alice Aycock's contract to include 



VAC-MIN1218. 91-twm Page 



the production of shop drawings to be completed by 
February 1 and a $5,000 increase in the artist's fee. 
Commissioner Sklar moved approval of the request, and 
Commissioner HeaJy seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

VII. Art Enrichment: Taraval Police Station 
Tonia Macneil introduced the program guidelines for art 
enrichment at Taraval Police Station. Gary Hoy, Project 
Architect from the Bureau of Architecture, described the 
planned renovations to the Station and the exterior si 
proposed for art enrichment. An artist will be 
commissioned to design and fabricate a (5 ' x 3' frieze above 
the door to the new Community Room. The public lobby is 
also an appropriate site, and the Committee recommended 
that an artist-designed wall treatment, such as a mural, 
textile or bas relief would be appropriate for the site. 
Staff requested that the Committee approve the program 
guidelines and selection process for the commissioning oi 
an exterior frieze and lobby-area wall t ■ t in 
keeping with the architectural style of the Taraval Police 
Station for a total art work budget not to exceed $40,u0u. 
Commissioner Healy moved to approve the request . 
Commissioner Sklar seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

VIII .Art Enrichment: Sunnydale Pump Station 
In response to a previous request of the Committee, 
Patricia Johansen, artist and Harold Coffey, project 
manager from the Clean Water Program presented the working 
drawings and landscape design plans for the Patricia 
Johansen piece to be installed at the Sunnydale Pump 
Station . 

The design has been reduced to the most basic materials 
and components in order to meet the $441,000 budget. The 
fabrication and installation will now go out to bid, so 
that the project may be complete as early as Fall of 1992. 
The Committee informed the new project manager, Shannon 
Maloney, that there should be no deduct alternates in the 
bid package, and that they wished to be informed 
immediately if the bids came in over budget. The 
Committee also requested staff to work with the Clean 
Water Program to identify funds to bring the artist to the 
site for critical points during installation, in 
particular the construction of the Ribbon Worm, the Arbor 
and the Snake's Head. Commissioner Boas requested that 
the Project Manager remind the landscape architect thai 
the Water Department structures on the site should be made 
as unobtrusive as possible. 



VAC-MIN1218 . 91 -twin Page 



IX. Art Enrichment: Tenderloin Recreation Center 

Jill Maiiton reported on the progress of the artist 
selection for the Tenderloin Recreation Center. 52 
candidates applied, from which the Selection Panel 
identified 11 semi-finalists. Artists will be 
commissioned to work together, experienced artists with 
less-experienced artists, and develop processes to involve 
children in the creation of the finished art work. Areas 
for possible art enrichment include walls, columns, 
lighting fixtures and sconces, and benches. 

Manton will present a short list of the proposed 
candidates at the next Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

X. Art Enrichment: Airport 

Susan Pontious noted that the status of the master plan 
was incorporated in her staff report, which the 
Commisioners had received. 

Pontious asked that the Commissioners approve a new site 
for the permanent installation of sculpture at the 
airport: a sculpture niche located in the central 
terminal lower level exit corridor. The area is under 
renovation and the site will be surfaced and lighted 
according to Public Art Program specifications. 
Commissioner Healy moved to approve the request. 
Commissioner LaRocca seconded. The ayes were unanimous. 

OLD BUSINESS 

XI. Art Enrichment: Market Street Art Master Plan 
Jill Manton informed the Committee that the artist Paul 
Kos has filed a lawsuit against the City. 

XII. Art Enrichment: Moscone Center/Howard Street 

The artist-team of the Howard Street site is currently 
preparing a written response to the contingencies 
identified by the Committee last June. The responses are 
due on January 1. Director Winship recommended that the 
Committee review the artists' written response before 
giving direction to the artists as to the scope of further 
work on the site. 

XIII. Policy: Arts Commission Jurisdiction 

Joanne Chow Winship clarified the Commission's 
jurisdiction over the aesthetic quality and placement of 



VAC-MlN1218.91-twm Page 



art. The Commission is not the only agem \ enl it Led to 
contract with artists or consultants on public art. 

The Committee requested that the Director write a Lettei 
to the Director of Planning stating that the Arts 
Commission has the expertise and experience on stafl and 
within the Commission to provide and oversee the placement 
of public art. 

Jill Manton informed the Commissioners that language had 
been included in the contracts with the Mid-Embarcadero 
contractors which requires that the public art plan be 
developed under the guidance of the Arts Commission. 

XIV. Art Enrichment: Muni-Metro Portal 

At the request of the Committee, artist Robert Millar 
described the process by which he had developed his 
concept for art work located at the Muni-Metro portal, and 
presented the proposed design. The budget for the project 
has not been identified, however the project architects 
have estimated that $275,000 to $300,000 will be 
available. The artist's design must be approved by the 
beginning of February in order to be incorporated into the 
60% construction documents, and there are many commissions 
and agencies with oversite. The Commissioners commented 
that the proposed design, representing the image of a 
striped bass, was problematic in terms of the scale, form 
and content, therefore it would be difficult to secure 
approval from the many parties concerned in the short time 
available. The artist was advised to continue in the 
spirit of his research but to rethink the form. 

XV. Art Enrichment: Embarcadero Gateway 

Mark DiSuvero has completed a drawing of his proposed 
sculpture for the Embarcadero Gateway, and has begun 
actual fabrication of a central element of the piece. 
Jill Manton presented the drawing and photographs of the 
work from the artist's studio. The Commissioners asked 
that the artist submit more drawings to clarify his 
proposed design, in particular the kinetic element and the 
base of the sculpture. 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:15 p.m. 



VAC-MIN1218.91-twm Page 



REPORTS AND ORDERS 

1 • Ordered: Approval of minutes of November 20, 
1991 Visual Arts Committee meeting. 
Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

2. Ordered: Approval of minutes as amended for 
November 8, 1991 Visual Arts Committee meeting. 
Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 

Vote: Unanimous 

3. Ordered: Approval of the loan of the Mark 
Adams Tapestries to the Moscone Convention Center for 
temporary installation beginning January 1992 until a new 
site for the tapestries is approved at the San Francisco 
International Airport. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

4. Ordered: Authorization to modify contract for 
Acconci, Saitowitz and Solomon (Promenade Ribbon Project) 
to expand scope of work for artist team to include 
production of working drawings for South Embarcadero, 
pending Port Commission and Sasaki approval; and to 
increase fee by $15,000 for this work. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

5. Ordered: Authorization to further modify 
contract with Acconci, Saitowitz and Solomon to authorize 
team to proceed with development of a design concept for 
the North Embarcadero to include detailed drawings of all 
locations for art concepts and to increase fee by $45,000 
for this work. 

Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

6. Ordered: Authorization to extend Alan Fleming's 
contract through February 28, 1992. 

Moved: Commissioner 
Vote: Unanimous 

7. Ordered: Approval of Aids Mural Project 
proposed by Arch Williams for City Health Clinic. 
Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 

Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MIN1218.91-twm Page - 7 



8. Ordered: Approval for Mural Project proposed by 
Jesse Topacio for General Hospital. 
Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

9 Ordered: Approval tor honorarium and traveJ 

payments for Muni-Metro finalists, Robert Millar, Carl 
Cheng, Nina Yankowitz and R.M. Fisher. 
Moved: Commissioner LaRocca 
Vote: Unanimous 

1() Ordered: Approval of the relocal ion of the 

George Washington Statue to the San Francisco Police 

Department for installation in the lobby of #1 Jones 

Street (Old Hibernia Bank Building) until a more permanent 

location is found. 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 

Vote: Unanimous 

u . Ordered: Approval of language for a resolution 
in'support of San Francisco City College's efforts to 
obtain funds for the planning and study of the proposed 
relocation of the Diego Rivera mural Pan American Unity. 
Moved: Commissioner Boas 
Vote: Unanimous 

12. Ordered: Authorization to modify contract 
Alice Aycock to expand scope of work to include production 
of shop drawings and to increase fee by $5,000 for this 
work . 

Moved: Commissioner Sklar 
Vote: Unanimous 

13, Ordered: Authorization to staff to implement 
art enrichment program as amended and to begin artist 
selection process for the Taraval Police Station fo 
total art work budget not to exceed $40,000. 

Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



14 



Ordered: Approval of "sculpture niche" in the 
central terminal lower level exit corridor at San 
Francisco Airport as a site for the installation of a 
permanent art work. 
Moved: Commissioner Healy 
Vote: Unanimous 



VAC-MINI 2 18. 91- twm Page 



Subnu I I ed : 



r amu 

T"onia Macneil 

Curator, Public Art Program 




Approved : 



(': M ^ 



Joanne Chow Wir\^hip 

Director of Cultural Affairs 



VAC-MIN1218.91-twm 



Page - 9 



HF 



AIDS MURAL PROJECT/Citv Health Center 

The follawina is a brief description of the desicin: 

We used a flowina composition, so that the eve moves continuously 
across. up. down, behind, throuah. followina the AIDS quilt which 
chanaes in texture depend ina upon where it is in the mural and what it 
is touchina or caverina. It is the quilt which ties all the 
imaaes toaether as we] as beina its own svmbol of resistance, 
couraae. and the will to survive. 

We created a desian that we hope will be archtvpal in its 
approach to this problem. Therefore none of the people featured 
in the mural are famous or known i ndi vi dual s . The i manes in the 
mural include: 

Bars of a prison throuah which liaht shines, the prison of AIDS 
as well as referina to the people with AIDS (PWA) who are 
sufferina in prisons. 

A fiaure who is pressina and pushinq aqainst the bars, a fiqure 
of defiance and will. The fiaure is presided aver bv a spirit 
auide, mavbe the soul. 

A trinitv of one man and two women. The woman in the forearound 
is a wise ciraridmather holdina a child with one hand and 
outstretchina her other hand from which a flame burns. 
The other woman in the trinitv holds an infant. These fioures are 
all of different ethnicities. 

A PWA who is emaciated and is fed with an IV. The IV turns into a 
flask from a researcher's experiment and from out of the flask 
comes a rainbow. 

An African musician plavs auitar. a scientist ponders. Rodin's 
Thinker thinks and is wrapped with cloth in protest. The Thinker 
is sittina an the alabe. indicatina the world wide problem that 
AIDS is. In front of the alabe a runawav vouth who is hustlina to 
survive confronts two policemen. 

Speakers speak at a demonstration, a man in a wheelchair waves 
his cane in defiance and -jubilation. More protesters are Ivinq 
on the around, thev hold eachather.. two others embrace. We are 
all af feted bv this crisis, so we have people of all races. both 
sexes, straight, aav., prennant.old and vouna. 

A candle liaht procession is illuminatinq the statue of Abraham 
Lincoln, reflectina the liaht af the sun which is featured in the 
center of the mural, risinq. 

We want, this mural to convev the horror and the hope. 



. 



December 8, 1991 dTL 

VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE DECEMBER 18, 199 1 
STAFF REPORT: COLLECTIONS/ Debra Lehane 

1. Mark Adams Tapestries 

For the past year, the Mark Adams tapestries have been on loan to the 
Fine Arts Museums. Thev were removed from the Airport at the 
Airport's request when the United Hub Lounge was leased as a Red 
Carpet private lounge. The Museums had planned to rotate the 
tapestries with two other sets of tapestries. Unfortunately, with 
the impending closing of the Legion of Honor, the Museums have not 
been able to exhibit the tapestries as planned and have no exhibits 
scheduled in the near future. 

In the meantime, Rudy Nothenberg has continued to be a great fan of 
Mark Adams. A year ago, Rudy had proposed to place the tapestries on 
the large wall as a temporary installation until Hung Lui's work is 
completed. Mr. Adams viewed the site and politely rejected the 
proposal as an inappropriate location for the tapestries. More 
recently, Rudy has proposed another location at Moscone Center. 

At the end of the Esplanade Ballroom is a curved wall, once 
considered as a possible site for art enrichment. On December 3rd, 
Mark Adams brought the color cartoons used for the weaving of the 
tapestries to Moscone Center as a way to view the worl s in the space. 
Mr. Adams is actually excited about the appearance of the tapestries 
in the space and is receptive to installing the works at Moscone 
Center. Rudy lias agreed to adjust the lighting and to pay for the 
cost of the installation of the pieces. The museum has been 
contacted and does not object to releasing the pieces since they have 
no plans at this time for displaying the items. The Airport has no 
objections to the works being displayed at Moscone Center. This 
would once again get the works on view in a public space in the city. 
The pieces would be returned to the Airport when a site is ready in 
the future. 

Staff Recommendation is to approve the loan of the Marl, Adams 
Tapestries to the Moscone Center for installation until the site at 
the airport is available. 

2. Statue of George Washington 

Due to the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, the statue of George 
Washington was never moved temporarily to City Hall as approved. 
City Hall is scheduled for major seismic retrofitting making the 
placement of the statue in City Hall impossible. The Police 
Department is interested in housing the statue in the lobby of the 
its new location at 1 Jones Street, (the old Hibernia Bank Building). 
The building is a classical building with a large lobby which would 
accommodate the statue well. We need to move the statue from the 
George Moscone School and locate it in a site which allows for access 
so that conservation of the bronze can occur as well as the design 
and installation of a new pedestal. Funds for this project have been 
provided by the Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution. The 
statue was a gift to the city by the Daughters cf the American 
Revolution in 1916. The War Memorial supports this request. 

Staff Recommendation is to approve the request to move the statue of 
George Washington to the lobby of the San Francisco Police Departmeir 
building at 1 Jones Street. 



3. Moscone Wall Maquettes 

In the past, all maquettes which came in through the Public Art 
Program were catalogued and incorporated into the office loan 
collection. Not all maquettes, however, fit the profile for 
successful lending to offices. In reviewing the large wall maquettes 
for the Moscone Convention Center, it is my recommendation that two 
of the pieces be offered back to the artists. The works were 
submitted by Judy Pfaff and Isamael Frigerio. 

If you recall, Judy's piece is a large three dimensional model which 
can not be mounted on a wall, but would require a pedestal or table. 
Generally, departments do not have space for models on this scale. 

Ismael's work is three large sections. Two of which give examples of 
the painted surface and the gold leaf used in his work. I recommend 
that we contact the artist for permission to destroy or return of the 
two example sections. The third section which is the drawing of his 
proposal is intersting, but would require framing in another manner 
which would be a cost to the collection. 

4. Diego Rivera Mural 

City College has been in touch with me and is once again anxious to 
pursue grant funding for feasibility planning of the proposed move of 
the Diego Rivera Mural at City College. During the summer, the 
college had requested a letter of support from the Arts Commission to 
submit with grant applications. Rather than a letter of support, I 
propose that we provide a resolution of support. Amalia and I will 
be meeting prior to the Visual Arts Committee meeting and I hope to 
have a draft of a resolution ready for your review by the Visual Arts 
Committee meeting. 




©ei**^ 



JAMES D. JEFFERSON. President 
FRANK A. QUINN, Vice-President 
HENRY E. BERMAN, Commissioner 
SHARON L. BRETZ. Commissioner 
TED N. SOULIS, Commissioner 



&tp and 6&untp o/Q&anQ^rancisco 



260 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA. 9410? 

FAX NO. 929-1058 

TELEPHONE (415)861-8000 EXT. 307 

RAYMOND G. CONNORS. JR . Secretary 

December 18, 1991 



Ms. Susan Pontiouf, Curator 
Arts Commission 
25 Van Mess Avenue. #240 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Ms. Pontiouf: 

The San Francisco Fire Departments owns a building at 356 - 7th 
Street, designated as former Station 27. It is currently leased to the 
Department of Public Health as a clinic. 

On Tuesday, December 17, 1991, the Fire Commission heard a 
presentation from Messrs. Conrad Den Okamoto and Arch Williams. They 
explained to the Fire Commission that they wanted to paint a mural (82' x 
25') on the north wall of former Station 27. The theme of this mural 
deals with health care. 

At the conclusion of the presentation, the Fire Commission, by a 
vote of 5-0, approved the use of former Station 27' s north wall for the 
colored mural herein discussed. 

Messers. Okamoto and Williams will be contacting you to be placed on 
the Arts Commission agenda for approval of their mural. 



Very truly yours, 
FIRE^COMMISSION 

/Raymond G. Connors 



Secretary 



RGCrlq 

cc: Conrad Okamoto 

Arch Williams 

Frederick F. Postel , Chief of Dept. 

Frank Scales, Asst. Deputy Chief - S/Svcs. 



DESIGNATED SITE AGREEMENT" 
Property Owner's Consent 



(Fur physical improvements (u titled in whale at in 
port by the Mayor's Office of Community Development 
and administered by tin- Mural Resource CrnicrJ 



PR0JEC1 Til IE 



ilth Center Mural (working title) 



City Hea! 

ARTIST/PROPONENT: Victor Fan, Susan Greene, Arch Williams 

PROJECT SITE: 356-7th Street, San Francisco, CA 



PROPtRl Y OWNER'S NAME 



ADDRESS: 



San Francisco Fire Department 

260 Golden Gate Ave 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

The Property Owner agrees to the following provisions reqardinq use 
uf his property/space, arising from the Community Development project 
to be implemented by the Artist and the Mural Resource Center: 

1. A mural painting will be fabricated and executed on the wall 
of a building located at . TSfS-7th Stree t . SFCA 

Property Owner agrees to sponsor the project at no cost to 
himsel f. 

2. The mural project will remain intact and shall not be defaced, 
altered or destroyed. 

Property Owner agrees to retain the mural as long as it remains 
intact and does not suffer abnormal deterioration. In any event of 
any change on the property which would affect the mural, or that 
the mural is damaged or deteriorated, altered or destroyed. 
Property Owner agrees to immediately contact the Mural Resource 
Center and the Artist by telephone or in writing, within thirty 
(30) days after the change occurred. 

3. The mural is owned by the City and County of San Francisco; it 
is public art under the caretakershi p of Property Owner. 

Property Owner acknowledges his caretakershi p role of the mural 
which is owned by the City and County of San Francisco. In the 
event he sells the land or building to a new owner. Property 
Owner must explain the relationship to the new owner and inform 
the Mural Resource Center and the Artist of the change of ownership. 



'R0PER1Y OWNER: _J^ ank Scalj;^, As_st. Deputy 

PRINTED NAME Chief, 
Support Svcs 




SIGNATURE 



Date: \^=_X\\3fL\ 



MA 



DRAFT RESOLUTION: 

Whereas, the Diego Rivera Mural titled Pan American Unity 
currently housed in the Little Theater at City College is 
one of the most important multicultural works of art in San 
Francisco, and; 

Whereas, the mural is a National Treasure of Inter American 
Art which thematically reflects the diversity of culture and 
a historical regional continental relationship between the 
United States and Latin America, and; 

Whereas, a National Treasure should be preserved, maintained 
and presented to the greatest possible audience, and; 

Whereas, the original intent of architect Timothy Pflueger 
and artist Diego Rivera was to house the mural in a library 
at City College, and; 

Whereas, City College has asked the assistance and 
endorsement of the Arts Commission with the proposed 
relocation of the mural to the new library facility, 
therefore ; 

Be It Resolved, that the San Francisco Arts Commission does 
hereby offer its support to City College and urges funding 
agencies to contribute toward the study and planning of the 
proposed relocation of the Diego Rivera Mural, Pan American 
Unity to the New Library Facility on the City College 
Campus . 



^nr 



TARAVA1, POLICE STATION 
ART ENRICHMENT PROGRAM 

Total Art Enrichment. Budget: $50,000 

Budget for Art work: $10,000 

Client: San Francisco Police Department 

Captain Tom Suttmeier, Planning Division 

Architect: Bureau of Architecture 

Peter Wong, Project Manager 
Gary Hoy, Project Architect 

Project Manager: Tonia Macneil 

SITE: 

Taraval Police Station, located in the Sunset District at 
2345 24th Avenue, is a 19th century brick building which is 
currently being remodeled and enlarged to include a new 
community room and expanded staff facilities. 

The station is located in a culturally mixed, stable 
community, so that there is not a strong need to acknowledge 
specific ethnic identities through the art program. 

APPROXIMATE TIMELINE: 

February 1992 Design development complete. 

July, 1992 Construction documents complete. 

December, 1992 Start of construction. 

March, 1994 End of construction. 

An additional timing issue is created by the upcoming 
staffing situation, therefore it is proposed to develop a 
program which minimizes staff obligation, particularly in 
the selection and contracting processes. 

ART ENRICHMENT: 

Sites : 

Two possible sites for art work have been identified: the 

lobby area and the exterior of the building above the 

entrance to the community room. They will be further 

described at the Visual Arts Committee meeting. 

1 . Exterior frieze 

To complement the pre-existing frieze above the entrance 

doors, a contemporary work might be created in terra-cotta 
or stone. Artist selection will be by development of a 

short list, with input from the client, for Committee 

approval. The proposed budget for the work will be $15,000 
to $20,000. 



In order to incorporate the art into the construction plana 
it must be designed by mid-April. Therefore still f uill 
begin research and selection upon appro> tJ oJ the \isual 
Arts Committee. 

2 . Lobby area 

The 13' x 21' lobby area will be the major public space the 
building, as the community room will lie used infrequently. 
The ceiling height is 12'. The proposed budge 1 for this 
area will be $20,000 to $25,000. 

Two possible ideas are proposed for this area: The direct 
purchase of art work for the walls of the lobby, or the 
commissioning of a fresco to be painted directly on the 
walls. In either case, selection of the art or an artist 
could be delayed until there is more staff time available. 



There are relatively few artists familiar with the fresco 
technique, therefore staff proposes to use the short-list 
method of selection, or even direct selection for this area, 



sx 



STAFF REPORT 

DATE: 12/12/91 

TO: Visual Arts Committee 

FROM: Susan Pontious 

RE: Airport 

Status of Master Plan for New Terminal: 

The Airport Art Steering Committee had planned to interview 
finalists for the consultant to help develop the master plan 
this month. However, the Planning Commission has required 
an addendum report from the Airport for the E.I.R., thereby- 
delaying the certification of the E.I.R. until sometime 
after the first of the year. Therefore, the hiring of the 
consultant is also delayed. The artists have been contacted 
and apprised of the situation. 

Potential "Sculpture Niche" 

William Canales, one of the Airport architects called to say 
that the airport is remodeling an area that connects the 
customs arrival area to the parking garage. It involves 
adding and re-aligning the elevators so that there is a 
straight line between exiting the elevators and the 
passageway to the garage . 

In the area is an existing "niche", 15' wide by 6' deep and 
8' 10" high. The architect felt that this area would gain 
new prominence because of the redirected pedestrian traffic 
patterns, and asked whether or not we might want to use it 
as a site for art. 

If we do, we would have to say so immediately, and then he 
would fit the space with our lighting requirements. If we 
are not interested in using the space, he will just wall it 
in . 

Debra Lehane and I will visit the site on the 17th so that 
we can recommend on whether or not we think the area has 
good potential for use as a setting for artwork. 




I 



(Not to Scale) 



....ilfl ■*•■=-? ___»- &V&&V- 



\ ^v 1111 



Approximate Study Area 




7/intwii It. 



Source: U.S. Coast Survey Map (1853) 



185-215-003 



Dames & Moore 



Bechtel National, Inc. 



MUNI METRO 
TURNAROUND FACILITY 
San Frandsco. California 



MAP OF THE STUDY AREA SHOWING 

DETAILS OF DOWNTOWN SAN FRANCISCO 

AND OLD SHORELINE (1853) 

PLATE 3-2 



Bec htel 

V Beale Street 

ian Francisco. CA 94105-1895 
Jailing address: P.O. Box 193965 
'•an Francisco. CA 94119-3965 



003624 



December 5,1991 



Ms. Faye Bernstein 
Faye Bernstein & Associates 
450 Sansome St.,Ste 1400 
San Francisco, CA 94111 

Mr. Tom Ho 

T.Y. Lin International 

825 Battery Street 

San Francisco, CA 941 1 1 

Mr. William Robinson 
Towill, Inc. 
Mission St.,Ste 300 
San Francisco, CA 94520 

Mr. Don Todd 
Don Todd & Associates 
1390 Market St., Suite 822 
San Francisco, CA 94102 



Mr. Demetrious Koutsoftas 
Dames & Moore 
221 Main Street, Suite 600 
San Francisco, CA 94105 

Ms. Kay Wilson 
Public Affairs Management 
Ferry Building , Suite 3047 
San Francisco, CA 941 1 1 

Mr. John Warren 
John Warren & Associates 
Inc1611 Telegraph, Latham 
Oakland, CA 94612 

Mr. Steven Wotfe 
Wilson, Ihrig & Associates 
5776 Broadway 
Oakland, CA 94618 



Mr. Gregory Carbullido 

Geo/Resources 

851 Harrison Street 

San Francisco, CA 94107 

Ms. Massy Kadivar 
Quasar Engineering, Inc 
5225 Betsy Ross Dr. 
Santa Clara, CA 95054 

Mr. Peter Wong 
PGH Wong Engineering, 301 
840 Taraval , Suite 200 
San Francisco, CA 941 16 



Subject: 



MUNI Metro Turnaround, Job 17892-003 
Artist contribution 



As the artist commissioned to work on this project, I am attempting to identify areas or issues that I 
should focus on. I am including some questions of interest with this memo. 

I solicit your assistance in exploring these questions. If there is one or more that is of specific 
interest to you — please respond. Additionally, if there are other questions that I should be 
pursuing, please make me aware of them. 

With your assistance I will be able to identify how best I can contribute to this project. 

If you have any questions please feel free to call me at (415) 768-5863. 



fSTncerejIy, 



Attachment: 

cc: Dave Sutter-UEB 

Phil Herzer-UEB 

Peter Frobenius-Bechtel 

File: 6.5,479 




m 

3/ Bechtel Corporation 



Who should this project benefit? 

How can it benefit them? 

How should it benefit them? 

Should the work benefit someone? 

What can an artist bring to this project that isn't currently a part of the project? 

Why are we doing this project? 

What are the qualities inherent to the inside of the tunnel? 

What are the qualities inherent to the outside of the tunnel? 

Is being in the tunnel better than being out of the tunnel? 

How can we bring those qualities into the tunnel? 

Who is going to ride this system? 

What directions will they ride it during different times of the day? 

When are the peak travel periods for this Muni line? 

How is the experience of riding Muni different during the peak travel period? 

What will people be doing when they ride? 

What do people see when they're riding the Muni in the tunnel? 

What do people expect to see when they're riding Muni in the tunnel? 

What should people see when they're riding Muni in the tunnel? 

What would we like people to see when they're riding Muni in the tunnel? 

What is the experience of riding the Muni in the tunnel? 

What is the experience of riding the Muni at grade? 

How is it similar? 

How is it different? 

Do we want to make either experience different? 

Why would we want to make either experience different? 

Will the riders look out the windows? 

Will they be watching the reflections in the windows? 

What do people want to see when they look into the windows? 

What do people expect to see when they look into the windows? 

What should people see when they look into the windows? 

What is the experience of moving through a tunnel and recognizing that first hint of light that 

signals the end of the tunnel? 
Can we manipulate that to heighten the experience and extend ft? 
Can we extend that experience so that it happens further back into the tunnel? 
Why would we want to? 



How fast will the train be moving? 

Will it move at different speeds? 

What will cause it to move at different speeds? 

When will it move at different speeds? 

How will this space change throughout the day and night? 

What will cause it to change during the day and night? 

How will people's perceptions of the space change during the day and night? 

Why will people's perceptions change? 

How will the space change throughout the year? 

What will cause the space to change throughout the year? 

How will this project affect the surrounding community? 

How will this project affect the surrounding economy? 

How will the project affect how people move through this area in the future? 

How will this project affect how people use this area of the city in the future? 

Will this project increase or decrease use of the surrounding area? 

Will this project change how the surrounding area will be used? 

How do we want the surrounding area to be used? 

Will recreational interests increase or decrease as a result of this project? 

Will tourism increase or decrease as a result of this project? 

How will a change in tourism affect this area? 

How do we want tourism to affect this area? 

Will retail stores increase or decrease as a result of this project? 

How will a change in retail affect this area? 

How do we want retail to affect this area? 

Will office space in the area increase or decrease as a result of this project? 

How will a change in office space affect this area? 

How do we want office space to affect this area? 

Will residential development in the area increase or decrease as a result of this project? 

How will a change in residential development affect this area? 

How do we want residential development to affect this area? 

Who will profit from this project? 

Who will profit financially from this project? 

How will they profit? 

What is this project about? 

What should this project be about? 

Why are we doing this project? 



Why should the citizenship tund this project? 

Why should people ride the Muni through this area? 

Why will people ride the Muni through this area? 

Why wouldnl people ride the Muni through this area? 

Where will the people be going to who ride through this tunnel? 

Why will they be going there? 

When will people ride the Muni through this tunnel? 

Where will the people be coming from who ride through this tunnel? 

What factors will increase or decrease ridership of the Muni in the future? 

What effect can we have on these factors? 

Will the people who ride the Muni through this project be travelling alone or with other people? 

If they ride with others will they be family members, friends, or business associates? 

Will the people who ride the Muni through this project be frequent travelers of the Muni system? 

Will the people who ride the Muni through this project be everyday riders? 

Will the people who ride the Muni through this project be reading while they're riding? 

Will they read primarily at one time of the day and not at other times? 

Will the people who ride the Muni through this project be looking out the window while riding? 

What will the people who ride the Muni through this project be looking at? 

Will the people who ride the Muni through this project be talking to each other while riding? 

Who will the people talk with? 

What do people see when they look out the window while riding through this project? 

What do people see when they look out the window while in the tunnel? 

What do people see when they look out the window while at grade? 

What do people see when they look out the window at night? 

What do people see when they look out the window during the day? 

Can people took out the window while riding through this project? 

What is the purpose of putting windows in the Muni cars? 

What do people see when they look at the window while in the tunnel? 

What is important in the lives of those who will ride through this project? 

What should be important in the lives of those who will ride through this project? 

How will this project benefit those who use it? 

How old are the people who will ride through this project? 

Will the people who ride through this area know the history of this area? 

Should the people who ride through this area know the history of this area? 

What is the history of this area? 

Who has used this area in the past? 



What has been the use ot this area in the past? 

Does the history ot this area have an effect on how we use it today? 

Will the history of this area have an effect on how we should use it tomorrow? 

What remains of yesterday in this area? 

Should we preserve what remains of yesterday? 

How would preservation of history benefit us? 

Can preservation of history benefit us? 

What can we learn from history? 

What should we learn from history? 

Is there anything in this area from the past that is beneficial to preserve? 

Is there anything in this area from the past that is worthy of being preserved? 

What criteria should we utilize to judge worthiness of preservation? 

Should we consider history? 

What will it be like to ride the Muni down the grade into the tunnel? 

What will it be like to ride the Muni up the grade and out of the tunnel? 

What is the best area/element of this project? 

Why is it the best? 

What is the worst area/element of this project? 

Why ts it the worst? 

What is the best part of the experience of riding the Muni through this project? 

What is the worst part of the experience of riding the Muni through this project? 

How can we make this project better? 

By what criteria will this project be judged? 

By what criteria will this project be judged 50 years from now? 

What questions should we ask? 



Robert Millar 
P.O. Box 515 
Manhattan Beach 
California 
90266 

310/376-5313 
December 17, 1991 FAX: Same 



"The interdependence of man with nature is based upon two distinctive aspects. The first is that 
of his direct relationships. The second and more subtle rests upon his social and esthetic 
relationships with the environment. 

"The first of these, then, is the practical level of ecology. It has to do with food production, the 
quality of water, the cleanliness of the air. Here are man's concerns with his safety, with pollution 
of both water and air and with the very climate that the Bay influences, and thus the ease of living. 

"The second dependence also has some practical aspects but it is primarily a matter of man's 
feelings; the appreciation of a natural scene, the thrill of watching wildlife living free, the crisp 
breeze with a salt tang. Here too are the relationships of the sport fisherman with a singing line or 
the sailboater fighting a resistant rudder. And, not least, there is the curious individual who seeks 
in the marshes and the mud shores the secrets of life itself. 

"No consideration of the ecology of San Francisco Bay can divorce itself from these two aspects. 
Economic use and its values enters into the ecological picture just as much as do the needs of the 
lover of the out-of-doors, the critical problems arise in trying to determine just exactly what the 
values are and to what extent immediate consideration vies with the distant future. The ecologist 
does not find easy answers, but seeks them by raising questions. Questions of how is it possible 
for millions of shorebirds to subsist on the food in the mud flats of San Francisco Bay? It may seem 
remote, but the answers to questions on shorebird survival may well uncover facts and principles 
that pertain to human survival. Thus questions contemplated because of their intrinsic interest 
may well have their practical applications in the realm of human endeavor. 

The values of intellectual and esthetic perception place man in the unique role of being a part of 
nature and capable of knowing that he is a part. The ability to know is our greatest human 
attribute. Einstein (1934) put it well when he suggested that "the sensitive soul seeks to escape 
from personal life into the world of objective thought and perception ..." We cannot all escape 
nor can any one of us escape all of the time from the practical problem of survival, but, the 
opportunities must be maintained for us to do so, for in this lies our humanism and our sanity. To 
understand and to appreciate the ecological relationships in San Francisco Bay are vital viable 
human activities; they may also serve to help us live a more enjoyable life free of health hazards 
and pollution." 

H. Thomas Harvey 

.Some Ecological Aspect s of San Francisco Bay 

Prepared for the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission 

(October, 1966) Pg. 1-2. 



"The major sport fish is the stripped bass of which about 3 million pounds are taken annually 
(Skinner, 1962). The most significant fact about this sport fishery is its availability to the vast public 
of the San Francisco Bay Area. The short distance from home to sport is an unusual and 
outstanding attribute of our region." 

Ibid., Pg. 5 



"In addition to the native species of fish, introduced forms play an important part in the food web of 
the Bay. The striped bass is a notable example of a successful transplant which now supports 
sport fishing valued at about $23,000,000 a year. Introduced in 1879, and then again in 1881 , 
the original fish have produced so well that 1 ,000,000 to 2,000,000 are caught annually (Skinner, 
1964)." 

Ibid., Pg. 12 



"Human benefit from the fish and wildlife of the Bay includes food, economic gain, recreation, 
science, education, and an environment for living. 

"For many of these uses, no dollar value can be assigned. For recreation alone, 135,000 man- 
days were spent hunting around the Bay last year, 370,000 user-days were spent bird watching, 
photographing, taking part in nature studies, etc., and more than 3,200,000 angler-days were 
spent behind a fishing pole. All of these numbers are expected to increase at least 60% by 1980 
and considerably more thereafter." 

San Francis co Bay Plan. Supplement 

San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission 

(January, 1969) Pg. 45 

The fishery resource of San Francisco Bay includes anadromous fish (which come through the 
Bay during their life cycle to spawn), native fish that spend their entire lives in the Bay, and crabs, 
shrimp, and shellfish. 

The anadromous fish are the most important. They generally mature in the ocean and enter fresh 
water to reproduce. Anadromous fish include striped bass, king salmon, sturgeon, steelhead 
trout, and shad." 

Ibid., Pg. 46-47. 



"Striped bass use virtually the entire Bay. The striped bass larvae hatch in the Delta and lower 
Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. Very large concentrations of young bass under two inches 
long are found in Honker, Grizzly, and Suisun Bays in late summer. Water quality and availability of 
food are considered critical at this time in their life cycle." 

Ibid., Pg. 47 

"The worst of many problems affecting fish and water birds are the elimination of three of their four 
principal habitats (tide flats, marshes, and shallow areas — leaving only water) through filling. 
Eighty percent of the marches that once existed in the Bay have been "reclaimed" through diking 
and filling for agriculture and industry." 

Ibid., Pg. 53